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A CALENDAR OF 



THE COURT MINUTES 

ETC. OF THE 

EAST INDIA COMPANY 

1640— 1643 

BY 

ETHEL BRUCE SAINSBURY 

WITH AN INTRODUCTION AND NOTES BY 

WILLIAM FOSTER 



PUBLISHED UNDER THE PATRONAGE OF HIS MAJESTY'S 
SECRETARY OF STATE FOR INDIA IN COUNCIL 



pi 






OXFORD 

AT THE CLARENDON PRESS 
1909 



HENRY FROWDE, M.A. 

PUBLISHER TO THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD 

LONDON, EDINBURGH, NEW YORK 

TORONTO AND MELBOURNE 



INTRODUCTION 

The period covered by the present volume commences just 
before the calling of the Short Parliament and ends (in the middle 
of the Civil War) with the death of Pym and the southward march 
of the Scottish troops to aid the forces of the English Parliament. 
With the events of that momentous time the reader is doubtless 
familiar, and it is only necessary to ask him to bear in mind, when 
reading this record of the doings of the East India Company, the 
bewildering and threatening state of public affairs throughout the 
four years. How greatly trade in general, and that of the East India 
Company in particular, was impeded and injured will be easily 
realized. The general insecurity made every merchant cautious 
in the purchase of goods, especially such commodities as silks and 
calicoes and indigo, with the result that the Company could 
scarcely find a market, and was forced either to seek outlets abroad 
for the contents of its overstocked warehouses, or to distribute them 
among its members. Fresh capital was a pressing necessity ; yet 
who would risk in distant enterprises money which he might 
urgently need to-morrow ? To these troubles we may add, in the 
earlier part of the time, the celebrated pepper bargain, by which 
the King unintentionally inflicted a serious monetary loss upon the 
Company : and later on the considerable exactions made by the 
Parliamentary party for the service of the State, together with 
sweeping sequestrations of the adventures of the Royalist members. 
Weighing these distractions and difficulties, we almost wonder that 
the East India merchants succeeded in keeping their Company 
afloat, and we pay a tribute of admiration to the men — particularly 
Cokayne and Methwold — who with undaunted courage steered the 
crazy vessel through all dangers into the comparatively calm 
waters of the Protectorate period. 

It was only gradually that the situation grew menacing. In point 
of fact the year 1640 opened for the East India Company with 
prospects that were distinctly encouraging. True, there were 

a 2 



iv COURT MINUTES 

clouds on the horizon. The current Joint Stock (the Third) was 
heavily in debt ; and, although it had been started as far back 
as 1 631, the members had only received two divisions of 125 per 
cent, each.^ The rival body known as Courteen's Association was 
still in the field, and there was no saying what damage had been 
inflicted on the Company's interests in the East by the fleet sent 
out in 1636 under Captain Weddell. On the other hand, King 
Charles had at last awakened to the fact that his encouragement 
of such competitors was endangering the continuance of the trade, 
and he had promised the Company his active support for the 
future ; there were hopes of recovering a substantial sum from the 
Dutch in satisfaction of long-standing claims ; while, as a more 
tangible asset, the Mary had just arrived from Surat with a valuable 
cargo.^ Further, it was confidently expected that on the strength 
of the King's promises (which included the grant of a new charter, 
with added privileges) the public would be induced to come 
forward with sufficient money for a new Joint Stock. 

The 'preamble' for the new subscription was completed and 
received the royal approval early in February, 1640. The list 
of subscribers was to remain open for Londoners until Lady Day, 
and for others until May i — dates which were afterwards extended 
to April 25 and May 25 respectively. Foreigners as well as 
Englishmen were to be admitted, but the minimum subscription 
was fixed at 1,000/. for the former and only 500/. for the latter. 
Although it is not so stated, the intention seems to have been that 
all subscribers should be incorporated by royal charter into a new 
Company, thus obtaining their freedom gratis ; but anyone buying 
an adventure afterwards was to pay a fee of 20/., if an Englishman, 
or double that sum, if a foreigner. The subscriptions were to be 
spread over four years, in sixteen quarterly payments commencing 
at Midsummer, 1640. The new charter was to make important 

^ Apparently these had been declared during the period (1637-39) for which the 
Court Minutes are missing. It is perhaps better to use ' division ' in this connexion than 
' dividends', a term which nowadays suggests profit or interest. Under the early form of 
the Joint Stock system, as practised in the East India Company, payments to the share- 
holders were of the nature of repayment of principal as well as of distribution of profits. 

^ Valued at about 1 50,000/. It is a good example of the large gains to be made in 
the India trade that one cargo should thus produce about 35 per cent, of the nominal 
capital. 



INTRODUCTION v 

changes in the government of the Company. The number of the 
Committees or Managers was not to exceed twelve, from whom 
the Governor would appoint a Deputy; five of them, and the 
Governor, were to retire each year, and the Governor was not to be 
eligible for immediate re-election. Finally, the old Company was 
not to send out any more stock after May, 1640, though it was 
to be allowed a suitable time for bringing home its goods remain- 
ing in the East. 

Probably we shall not be far wrong in connecting with this 
impending appeal for fresh capital the division of 35 per cent. 
(in silk^) which was recommended by the Court of Committees 
and accepted by the generality on February 7. At the same 
meeting authority was given for the dispatch of a stock of 50,000/. 
in the four ships then under orders for the Indies, viz. the Jofias, 
Swan, and Caesar for Bantam, and the Crispian for Surat. As the 
result of all this expenditure, the Company's debt rose to 100,000/., 
and for this amount it was decided to issue a policy of insurance, 
as had been done a few years before. 

The detailed proposals for raising a fresh stock were laid before 
a General Court on March 12, 1640, when, by direction of King 
Charles, Lord Cottington attended to declare His Majesty's re- 
solution to favour the trade and to renew the Company's charter, 
with such further privileges as should be fitting. Satisfaction was 
promised in the matter of the Company's grievances against the 
Dutch, Courteen's Association, &c., and an undertaking was given 
that all patents for plantations in Madagascar, Mauritius, and other 
islands in the Indies should be cancelled and no fresh grants made. 
A rather unnecessary recommendation of economy in future ex- 
penditure was added, and the royal message concluded by express- 
ing a hope that a sufficient amount would be subscribed to effect 
all that was intended, as otherwise His Majesty must find some 
different way of maintaining the trade. When Lord Cottington 
had finished, the Governor, Sir Christopher Clitherow, after himself 
making some optimistic remarks, called upon ex-President Meth- 

* The two previous divisions had been in cloves ; but shareholders could in all these 
cases have money instead, on condition of waiting for it. Many preferred this course ; 
and it will be noticed that of the shares transferred during the first six months of 1640 
some had 125, some 25, and some 50 per cent, taken out. 



vi COURT MINUTES 

wold, who had recently arrived from Surat in the Alary. He gave 
the meeting an encouraging account of the state of affairs in India, 
dwelling upon the revival of manufactures after the recent famine, 
the establishment of commerce between Surat and the Indus delta, 
and the benefits to be expected from the peace recently concluded 
with the Portuguese. The trade of India, he declared, was never 
in a more hopeful position ; and with these cheerful words ringing 
in their ears the members were dismissed to think over the amount 
each should subscribe. 

But however much the King might promise- — and his subjects 
might well be excused if by this time they attached little impor- 
tance to any promises he might make— the public could not be 
induced to come forward with the necessary funds. Indeed, in the 
existing state of feeling in the City, it is probable that Charles's 
interference did more harm than good ; while the clouds on the 
political horizon supplied another reason to prudent men for 
hesitating to sink money for several years. At a General Court 
held on April 17 the Governor reproached the members of the 
Company for their backwardness. The significant suggestion was 
made by one shareholder that a petition should be presented to 
the House of Commons (which had met four days earlier, after 
an interval of eleven years), complaining not only of the Dutch but 
of the damages suffered by the depredations of Cobb and Ayres ; 
and to this the equally significant reply was made that the advisa- 
bility of such a course had been debated by the Committees them- 
selves that very morning, and it had been decided to consult the 
Recorder of London. His advice, it seems, was against taking 
a course which would certainly irritate His Majesty without pro- 
ducing any compensating advantage ; and nothing had been 
decided when the King dismissed the two Houses (May 5). The 
day appointed for closing the subscription passed, and it was found 
that the total offered was only 22,500/. On June 3 the Committees 
sorrowfully debated the reason why so small a sum had been under- 
written. The general opinion attributed the public discouragement 
to the want of satisfaction for the injuries done by the Dutch, the 
competition of Courteen's Association, the depredations of the 
pirates, the raising of the customs duties, the restrictions imposed 
on the sale of the Company's saltpetre, and the dissatisfaction 



INTRODUCTION vii 

excited by the proposed alterations in the government of the 
Company. Most of these grievances were due to the action 
or inaction of the Administration, and Charles can scarcely have 
been pleased with the reasons given for the meagre response made 
to his appeal. A fresh attempt was made on June 26 to stimulate 
the members of the Company to subscribe to the new stock ; but 
all that they would say was that they would consider the matter 
when the old stock had been drawn home. 

As fresh capital could not be attracted, it became necessary for 
the existing shareholders to shoulder the burden of carrying on the 
trade. Fortunately, in the middle of June the Discovery arrived 
from Surat with a good cargo, and intelligence that four more 
ships might be expected shortly. Encouraged by this the adven- 
turers sanctioned the expenditure of 12,000/. in coral and broad- 
cloth for a further venture. 

The annual election was held on July 3, 1640. Sir Christopher 
Clitherow, William Cokayne, and Robert Bateman were re- 
appointed Governor, Deputy, and Treasurer respectively ; and six 
new ' Committees ' (including Methwold) were chosen. In the same 
month arrived three more ships, the London, William, and 
Reformation — the first from Surat, and the other two from 
Bantam.^ With the aid of the cargoes of these vessels it was 
estimated that the Company was in a position to pay all its debts, 
with 168,000/. over; and thereupon a further division of 25 per 
cent, (in calico) was ordered to be made (August 19). 

Another interesting decision taken at this time was that the 
Company should itself export a considerable quantity of pepper 
to Italy for sale. The proposal was no doubt prompted by the 
bad state of the market in London ; but it also held out the pros- 
pect of a double advantage, as the money obtained for the pepper 
could be returned in coral (then the most profitable commodity for 
export to India) and in rials of eight, which were to be had in Italy 
far more cheaply than in England. There was of course an in- 
creased risk of loss either outwards or inwards, but this was covered 
by insurance. The venture turned out a success ; and it was 
repeated in each of the three following years. 

^ The London reached the Downs on July 8th, and two days later the IVilliam and 
Re/orjnalio7i came in {Marine Records, vol. Ixiv). 



viii COURT MINUTES 

The summer of 1640 was an anxious one for England. Charles 
was still obstinately bent on coercing the Scotch Covenanters, and 
to this end small bodies of pressed men — more formidable, in their 
mutinous and half-starving condition, to their own countrymen than 
to Leslie's well-equipped forces — were being directed towards 
Conway's camp at Newcastle. To find money for their pay and 
support without having recourse to a Parliament, the King was 
driven to the most desperate courses ; and London, as the richest 
and handiest source of supply, felt the full weight of his hand. 
The collection of the hated ship-money was vigorously pressed. 
Repeated requests were made to the City for a loan, but only to be 
steadily refused. The bullion in the Tower belonging to private 
merchants was seized, and held until the owners agreed to lend 
40,000/. on the security of the Farmers of the Customs. Then 
came the proposal, happily futile, to issue a debased currency ; and 
finally the extraordinary deal with the East India Company over 
their pepper. The former of these two measures caused the Com- 
pany only a passing alarm. Upon the first rumours of the King's 
intention, one of their creditors — a lady — demanded either the 
repayment of the money she had lent or an assurance that the 
debt would be discharged in gold or in silver at its present value. 
The fear that other creditors would follow her example led the 
Court of Committees to resolve upon petitioning against the scheme ; 
but when the Governor and others went to wait upon His Majesty 
with the petition, it was found that numerous representations had 
already been made of the same tenor ; and on the advice of their 
friends at Court, they decided 'to rest quiett, expecting the event '. 
Before long this egregious proposal was quietly dropped. 

In the second of these transactions the Company were of course 
directly concerned, and the details now given are full of interest — 
all the more so because many features of the affair have been mis- 
understood. Bruce's account {Annals, vol. i, p. 371) is that King 
Charles, urged by his financial distresses, ' obliged ' the East India 
Company to sell to him on credit the whole of the pepper it had 
in store, which His Majesty promptly resold for cash at a price 
which brought him in over 50,000/. This bald statement of the 
case has led many subsequent writers to use harsh language con- 
cerning the King's action in the matter. In the light, however, 



INTRODUCTION ix 

of the Company's own records, it will be seen that in reality Charles 
had little to do with the transaction, his Chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer (Lord Cottington) being the principal person figuring 
therein ; that the proposal arose from the Company's own action 
in offering its pepper to public tender'; that the bargain was agreed 
to by the shareholders — with reluctance, no doubt, but without 
ostensible demur ; that ample private security, in addition to the 
guarantee of the State, was provided for the payment of the money ; 
and that the loss which was ultimately incurred was due to causes 
which were not foreseen and were beyond the control of the King 
and his ministers. 

The story begins with a ' General Court of Sales ' which was 
held on Friday, August 21, 1640. On this occasion, the stock 
of pepper being a very heavy one, it was decided to invite sub- 
scriptions for parcels of 100 bags at a fixed price, viz. 2s. id. per lb. 
for exportation and 2s. 2d. for sale in town. All considerable 
transactions at this time were on a credit basis ; and accordingly 
payment was to be made in four instalments at intervals of six 
months each from Michaelmas. Further, it was agreed that there 
should be ' noe sale unles all bee underwritten before Tuesday 
night '. Apparently it now occurred to someone of the King's 
party that here was an opening for raising the money of which 
Charles — who had started for the north on August 20 — was so 
desperately in need for the expenses of the campaign against the 
Scots. No doubt it was unusual for a King of England to be buy- 
ing and selling pepper ; ^ but the financial situation required heroic 
remedies, and if 50,000/. or more could be raised by a sale of the 
goods, while the payment of the cost was postponed, such considera- 
tions could not be allowed to stand in the way. Prompt action 
was taken ; for on the 22nd, before a number of the Committees 
hastily convened, Lord Cottington in person, after dwelling on ' the 
many and urgent occasions His Majesty at present hath, and 

' Yet precedent were not entirely wanting. In September, 1609, King James had 
entered into negotiations with the Company for the purchase of a shipload of pepper just 
received, but the proposal fell through (see Calendar of Slate Papers, E.Indies, 1513- 
j6i6, pp. 193-195). Dr. W. R. Scott has also reminded me that Elizabeth kept all the 
pepper captured in the Madre de Dios, and that in 1597 a proclamation was issued 
prohibiting the importation of cochineal and indigo until the Crown had disposed of the 
stock obtained from prizes. 



X COURT MINUTES 

especially against the Scotts ', offered in the King's name to buy- 
all the Company's pepper on the terms set forth in their ' preamble ' 
and to furnish unexceptionable security ; and he added that a com- 
pliance would doubtless entail a favourable consideration of the 
concessions the Company was seeking from the State. To prove 
his sincerity in the matter, His Lordship offered his personal 
guarantee, in the most absolute manner, for the payment of the 
money at the periods fixed. Evidently the Committees were 
rather startled by the proposition ; and indeed it is not unlikely 
that most, if not all of them, shared the general feeling of the City 
against the illegal exactions of the Government, and were not dis- 
posed to do anything to extricate Charles from his embarrassments. 
Still, as they knew, it was dangerous work thwarting His Majesty ; 
and so we find them hesitating and hedging. The Governor 
alleged that the money to be obtained from the sale of the pepper 
was needed for payment of part of the Company's debt, and that 
the adventurers might be alarmed by any transaction of the kind. 
To the former Lord Cottington made the obvious retort that he 
was not asking any lower price or any longer credit than the Com- 
pany had already offered to accept ; while as for the latter considera- 
tion, he declared that any apprehensions of that nature were merely 
' pannick feares '. However, he was persuaded to wait until the 
Wednesday following, when the matter could be submitted to 
a General Court ; and it was decided that in the meantime the 
invitation for subscriptions should be withdrawn. 

A general meeting was accordingly summoned for August 26. 
It was preceded, as usual, by a court of Committees, at which the 
Governor reported that he, with the Deputy and two others, had 
waited on the Lord Treasurer and Lord Cottington, who had 
warned them ' to handle the busines at the generall court in the 
afternoone soe tenderly that noe affront bee put upon His Majesty 
or the security proposed, but that by the best meanes they can 
they endeavour to perfect the bargayne, His Majesty having taken 
notice thereof. Hereupon the Lord Mayor, Sir Henry Garway, 
spoke in favour of the proposal, urging that the security was good 
' and the price and tyme were of the Committees owne setting '. 
A suggestion was made that the transaction might shake the 
Company's credit; but this danger was not thought to be serious, 



INTRODUCTION xi 

and finally it was decided to support the proposal. At the general 
court, therefore, the Governor's opening speech was favourable to 
the project. He gave the names of the intended securities — 
Lord Cottington himself, and the Farmers of the-Customs, including 
Sir Paul Pindar, Sir Peter Wyche, Sir Nicholas Crispe, and other 
well-known men — and he declared that 'the Court of Committees 
have seriously debated theproposicion and conceive it noe prejudice 
to the Company to sell off the whole parcell of pepper roundly 
togeather at the Companies owne price and tyme and the security 
proposed, none having come to underwrite within the tyme limited, 
and the Lord Cottington promising to discompt after a short tyme ; 
and if some fewe had underwritt, yett had it bin noe sale unles all 
had bin underwritt for. Besides, if it had staid unsold a weeke 
longer, it would have abated in price, as was conceived, and bin 
sold at 22^. per lb.'. Finally, he mentioned the hint which had 
been received regarding the affront which would be given to the 
King by a refusal. On this a shareholder protested against inter- 
ference with the Company in the disposal of its goods, though he 
admitted that the security was ample and the price a good one ; 
while another member grumbled at being prevented from under- 
writing for part of the pepper himself. No other opposition being 
manifested, the Committees urged the acceptance of the proposal, 
as likely to secure valuable concessions from His Majesty, ' adding 
further that if any strainger had made the same offer hee shold 
have had it, nor can it bee worse for the Company because the 
King hath the bargayne.' Evidently there were some malcontents 
who did not care to show themselves openly, for the suggestion 
was made that the question should be put to the ballot. This was 
rejected as being 'distastfull to the Lords and in a manner for- 
bidden '. Next it was proposed that the decision should be left to 
the Committees ; but the latter declined to accept this responsibility. 
The Governor now urged the assembly to assent unanimously to 
the proposal, ' which in his opinion wilbee the best act the Company 
ever did, and (as hee conceives) will conduce most to the future 

good of the trade freely acknowledging that first hee was 

very fearefull, but upon better consideracion hee hath laid aside all 
feare.' Then the motion was put, and ' with a generall yea the 
bargayne .... was assented unto and confirmed '. 



xii COURT MINUTES 

Sanction having thus been obtained and the requisite security 
given, the pepper was handed over. There were 607,522 lb. of it, 
and at 2s. id. a pound the Hability incurred was 63,283/. lis. id. 
This was to be discharged by four payments of 14,000/. each at 
intervals of six months, the first being due in March, 1641, and by 
a payment of 7,283/, 11s. id. at Christmas, 1641. Lord Cottington 
now sold the pepper to various merchants at 1.5-. 8^. per lb. for cash, 
realizing 50,626/. 17^. id. The result was an apparent loss of 
12,656/ 14^., but against this was reckoned, in the Exchequer 
accounts, 6,075/. ^3^- '^^- ^s the interest which (at the usual rate of 
eight per cent.) would have had to be paid for a loan of equal 
amount, leaving 6,581/. Oi'. lod. as the net loss on the transaction 
(p. 159). This was equivalent to borrowing the cash at about 
seventeen per cent. ; but, considering the financial straits of the 
Treasury, Lord Cottington and his associates probably thought it 
a good stroke of business. On the other hand, the Company had 
no immediate cause of disquietude. They had got rid of their 
pepper at their own price (which seems to have been rather more 
than it was worth) ; and they had ample security for the payment. 
Moreover, as we have seen, the bondsmen included the Farmers of 
the Customs, and should the ordinary resources of the Exchequer 
fail, the customs due from the Company would by themselves 
extinguish the debt in a comparatively short time. 

All these hopes were destined to be disappointed. The story is 
a long one, extending as far as the year 1663 ; but it may be con- 
venient to deal at this point with the remaining references to it 
which occur in the present volume. As we have seen, the first 
instalment fell due at Lady Day, 1641, the second at Michaelmas, 
and the third at Christmas of the same year. The failure of the 
Treasury to meet the first of these obligations was so natural, con- 
sidering its want of money and the tension existing between the 
King and the Houses, that it was not until August that the matter 
was debated in the Court of Committees.^ It was then decided 
to do nothing until the second instalment became payable. 
Michaelmas and Christmas came and went : the instalments over- 

^ The letters from the King to the Commissioners of the Treasury and the late Farmers 
on p. 182 seem, however, to show that some pressure had already been brought to bear 
on the latter. 



INTRODUCTION xiii 

due had mounted up to 35,283/., but still there was no sign of 
payment forthcoming. The late Farmers of the Customs, who 
were guarantors with Lord Cottington, had, however, before their 
dismissal allowed the Company to retain in part-payment about 
9,000/. due to the State for customs on East Indian imports, and 
the Company was also keeping back another 3,000/. due on the 
same account. But this did not go far towards liquidating the 
debt ; and so (January, 1642) the Company began to bring 
pressure upon Lord Cottington to make good his warranty. He 
wrote earnestly to the King — who had left London a fortnight 
before — begging that steps might be taken to meet the liability. 
Towards the end of March came fresh trouble. The House of 
Commons, being hard pressed for funds and feeling little sympathy 
with those who had supplied money to the King without the 
sanction of Parliament, peremptorily ordered the Company to pay 
up the 12,000/. they had kept back from their customs. This 
order, it seems, was not insisted upon ; but the fear of its enforce- 
ment, and the passing of another instalment-date without payment, 
led the Company to resolve to sue the guarantors. Thereupon 
Lord Cottington appealed again to the King to save him and his 
fellow-bondsmen from ruin ; but His Majesty had no money for 
the purpose and, sorry as he unfeignedly was, could do little to 
help. He wrote from York to the Company, begging them to be 
reasonable and promising to do his best for their relief ; while at the 
same time he instructed the Commissioners of the Treasury to find 
means of satisfying the Company's demands. After some delay the 
Commissioners (August, 1642) submitted to the King a list of royal 
parks, forests, and chases, from the sale of which funds might be 
found to discharge the debt ; but in the same month the Civil War 
broke out and all hope of an accommodation from this direction 
came to an end. 

The Company now resolved to take the matter into the law 
courts and endeavour to get the money from Cottington and the rest. 
This plan, however, resulted in nothing. Cottington was lying 
ill at his country house ; and the other guarantors, having been 
dismissed from their office as Farmers of the Customs and heavily 
fined, were too much involved to be worth proceeding against for 
the present. So the matter rested till June, 1643, when the 



xiv COURT MINUTES 

Company's counsel was consulted as to the advisability of taking 
further steps. In the following month a committee was appointed 
to treat with three of the guarantors — Pindar, Harby, and Nulls ; 
but apparently nothing came of this, though on December 15 orders 
were given that an action should be brought against some of them. 
We shall hear more of the story in the next volume ; in the mean- 
time any one who is curious about it may be referred to an article 
by the present writer in the English Historical Review for July, 
1904. 

We must now return to the autumn of 1640. The shareholders 
of the Third Joint Stock had by that time received back 75 per 
cent, of their capital. In September, 1640, a proposal was enter- 
tained of dividing a further 30 per cent, in goods, of which two- 
thirds should count as a division on capital, and the remaining 
third be paid for by the stockholders as a means of discharging 
part of the Company^s debt at interest. This, however, was 
negatived, largely in view of the high amount of the debt, which 
was 250,000/. or over, and still growing. Anxious as every one 
concerned was to close the current Stock, it was felt that the trade 
must not be deserted ; and so proposals of the Court of Committees 
for the dispatch of fresh shipping to the East were reluctantly 
adopted by the generality. In accordance with these plans, the 
Reformation left towards the end of November for Masulipatam 
and Bantam ; and preparations were made for sending out four or 
five more ships in the spring. 

All this, however, was understood to be in the nature of a stop- 
gap until a new Stock could be floated. The hopes of doing this 
with success were re-kindled by the meeting of the Parliament 
which Charles had at last been forced to summon. To this 
assembly all men were looking for the cure of the various ills of 
the State ; and among the rest the members of the East India 
Company were confident that the Houses would redress their 
grievances and, by giving parliamentary sanction to their privileges, 
restore the fortunes of their trade. They seem to have expected 
immediate attention to the subject, for on November 9, 1640 
(only six days after the meeting of the Houses), the Court of 
Committees made preparations to answer inquiries regarding the 
management of the trade. Parliament, however, had matters of 



INTRODUCTION xv 

higher importance in hand, and nothing more was heard for some 
weeks. 

In January, 1641, the Company decided to present to the 
Commons a petition, complaining against Endymion Porter and 
his associates in connexion with the depredations in the Red Sea ; 
also a ' remonstrance ' of other ' aggrievances ', including, it would 
seem, the infringement of their monopoly by Courteen. The 
rumour of their intentions alarmed the King. With Strafford in 
the Tower, Windebank and Finch in exile, and Laud under 
impeachment, he might well feel that no servant of his was safe 
from attack ; and Porter was particularly obnoxious to the popular 
party for many reasons. In consequence, the Governor was hastily 
summoned to Courts where His Majesty earnestly begged that the 
petition should be withdrawn, declaring that Porter had really 
nothing to do with the business ' and that what was done was His 
Majesties act '. Clitherow replied that he feared it was now too 
late, as the petition had already been delivered to a member for 
presentation ; but Charles rejoined that the document had not been 
read and might therefore be withdrawn, adding that, if it were not, 
' hee must and would owne the busines '. Further he told them 
that ' he had in agitation a round busines concerning them ' — no 
doubt he was alluding to the negotiations with the Dutch — ' and 
without him they could never gett a penny.' In face of all this, it 
was deemed prudent to recall the petition and remonstrance, and 
in lieu thereof to address His Majesty, begging him to prevent 
Courteen from sending any more ships to the East. This docu- 
ment was graciously received, and the King promised to speak 
with Courteen upon the subject. He thanked the deputation for 
withdrawing their petition against Porter ; and the latter also took 
an opportunity of expressing his gratitude to the Company, at the 
same time promising to further an accommodation between them 
and Courteen. After some delay a conference took place between 
the two parties on February 24, 1641 ; but it proved futile, for 
Courteen, who a few days before had dispatched a fresh pinnace 
(the Paradox) to the Indies, demanded to be refunded all the 
money he had laid out, with interest for the same and consideration 
' for his paynes in this busines ' ; while the Company were only 
willing to take over, at a reasonable price, the existing assets in 

S.C.M. 11 D 



xvi COURT MINUTES 

India and In England. A further meeting on March 5 was equally 
inconclusive ; and so the negotiations came to an end for the time 
being. 

In the introduction to the last volume an account was given of 
the circumstances in which negotiations for the settlement of the 
English claims against the Dutch East India Company were com- 
menced at the Hague between, on the one hand, Sir William 
Boswell, the English ambassador, in conjunction with Anthony 
Van Den Heuvel as special procurator for this business, and, on 
the other, the States General and the Dutch Company. Boswell 
returned to his post in June, 1640, with instructions to press this 
matter vigorously.^ He was to claim that Pulo Run should be 
replanted and made over to the English : that the former treaties 
should be renewed and duly observed : and that, in compensation 
for past injuries, a sum of 300,000/. should be paid to his master. 
If necessary, he might reduce that amount to 100,000/., but he was 
not to accept less. These demands were duly presented to the 
States General, and by them referred to the Dutch East India 
Company. Negotiations ensued, but the Hollanders, while pro- 
fessing their desire to end the dispute, were by no means disposed 
to yield to Boswell's terms. On December 14, 1640, the ambas- 
sador wrote to the King that he had gradually lowered his require- 
ments to 110,000/., but the highest offer yet made to him was 
50,000/., and this was to include the renunciation of the English 
claim to Pulo Run. He hoped that the Dutch would advance to 
70,000/. or even 80,000/., but did not expect more ; and therefore 
requested instructions as to his course of action. He seems to have 
been told in reply to do the best he could ; and he resumed the 
negotiations with hopes of success, though he had just lost his 
right-hand man by the death of Van Den Heuvel. 

Meanwhile the English Company was waiting patiently for the 
result of Boswell's labours. The arrival, in January, 1641, of 
ambassadors from Holland to solicit the hand of an English 
Princess for the young Prince of Orange, seemed to promise the 
early removal of all causes of friction ; and towards the end of that 
month a deputation from the Company waited upon Secretary Vane 

^ The account that follows is based mainly upon documents in the collection of State 
Papers, Holland (vols, clvi and clvii) at the Public Record Office. 



INTRODUCTION xvii 

to inquire what progress had been made in the settlement of their 
claims. Apparently there was a shrewd suspicion that the King 
intended to appropriate part of any sum that might be recovered ; 
and so the Governor laid stress upon the Company's needs and the 
disheartening effect which any action of the kind would have upon 
the adventurers. In reply, Vane disclaimed all expectation of an 
immediate settlement, but discreetly inquired whether 50,000/. 
would satisfy them ; to this a non-committal answer was returned, 
but at a second interview the Company's representatives hinted 
guardedly that 50,000/. would be accepted. Apparently they were 
then asked whether, in the event of the King obtaining this sum 
for them, they would drop their claims on account of the Red Sea 
piracies; and at a meeting held on February 17, 1641, it was 
resolved to accept the sum mentioned in full satisfaction of the 
claims both against the Dutch and against Cobb and Ayres, with 
the reservation that this must not be taken to include any losses 
caused by the latter of which the Court was as yet ignorant. 

Boswell was indignant when he heard of the Company's con- 
tention that they ought to receive the whole of the compensation. 
He pointed out that damages had been demanded on behalf of the 
King as well as on account of the Company : ^ that the claims 
of the latter, after rejecting flimsy and unreasonable items, would 
not amount to much above 30,000/. : that Charles had promised 
to give Van Den Heuvel or his heirs 10,000/. out of the amount re- 
covered, and had authorized Boswell to distribute another 5,000/. 
among those in Holland who might help the matter forward, to say 
nothing of gratuities and rewards expected by others (including 
Boswell himself). In his opinion the Company, who could get 
nothing unaided, ought to be content if the King were graciously 
pleased to give one-third or even one-fourth of any amount he 
might receive. At the same time, matters were by no means 
sufficiently far advanced to discuss the division of the money ; for 
he heard that the Dutch Company were standing out stiffly against 
any compromise, and were suggesting a reference to French, Italian, 
or German arbitrators. This idea, if entertained, was soon aban- 

1 This is corroborated by the statement given at p. 303 of the last volume. Eoswell's 
two letters, dated March 4, 1641 (O. S.), will be found in vol. clvii of the State Papers, 
Holland. 

ba 



xviii COURT MINUTES 

doncd. In the same month of March, 1641, Philip Burlamachi was 
able to tell the London Company that their Dutch rivals were 
willing to pay 500,000 guilders (about 40,000/.) ; whereupon a fresh 
deputation was sent to Court, which returned without any definite 
information. It is amusing to note that the members, mindful 
of former fears, suggested to Secretary Vane that, as the exchange 
was high, the most satisfactory mode of payment would be to 
deposit the money in the Company's name in some Dutch banks. 
On April 8 Boswell wrote again for instructions ; he could get no 
higher offer than 500,000 guilders, though he still had hopes of ob- 
taining 700,000 or even 800,000. He was thereupon authorized 
to accept 700,000 guilders, but nothing less — on which terms he 
might renounce the claim to Pulo Run ; and in August he wrote 
that he had a promise of early satisfaction. However, all these 
expectations were doomed to disappointment. The negotiations 
dragged on at the Hague, and in October the English ambassador 
wrote that nothing had been concluded ; and when, in December, 
Secretary Nicholas was asked how matters stood, he could only 
promise to look up the papers on the subject. It seems probable 
that the Hollanders never intended to yield to demands which they 
regarded (with some reason) as unjustified, unless they were con- 
strained by political considerations ; and for the present it was 
obvious enough that Charles was no longer master in his own 
kingdom and was utterly unable to exert any pressure on a con- 
tinental government. From time to time hopes of a satisfactory 
settlement were revived. In October, 1642, it was even decided 
to send Methwold to Holland to negotiate with the Dutch Com- 
pany, chiefly because it was feared that the money which the 
English expected to receive would 'goe annother waie', as the 
Queen was then at the Hague busily engaged in raising funds and 
providing munitions of war for her husband ; at the last moment, 
however, Methwold's deputation was cancelled, and it was decided 
to be content with writing to Boswell and the Company's agent 
at Amsterdam. In the following March the Deputy read to the 
Court a letter from a friend in Holland on the subject, and he was 
instructed to reply that the Company was willing to send over 
a representative to negotiate, provided that the Dutch would make 
good their former offer of 500.000 guilders, without requiring the 



INTRODUCTION xix 

relinquishment of Pulo Run. This is the last we hear of the subject 
up to the end of 1643. 

Mention is also made in June, 164.1, of overtures to the Portu- 
guese embassy which, now that Portugal had declared her indepen- 
dence of Spain, had arrived in London seeking to renew the ancient 
alliance with England. The result of the negotiations was the 
Anglo-Portuguese treaty which was ratified at York on May 22, 
1642.^ By clause xii of this document it was agreed that the truce 
in the East Indies concluded by Methwold and the Viceroy of Goa 
in January, 1635, should be continued, and that commissioners 
should be appointed on either side to settle all outstanding 
differences. In accordance with the latter provision, the Portuguese 
Agent, in January, 1643, requested the Company to nominate such 
commissioners ; whereupon the names of the President at Surat 
and four of the principal factors were suggested. However, the 
Company's letters to Oxford, requesting a royal commission to this 
effect, remained unanswered ; and as it seemed hopeless to get such 
a document ' in these distracted tymes ', the Deputy and two others 
were authorized on December 20, 1643, to treat with the Portuguese 
Agent in London for the purpose of inducing him to write to India 
to explain matters. 

We must now glance at the movements of the Company's 
shipping. In January, 1641, the Caesar returned from Bantam 
with a good lading. This experiment in hiring a ship had proved 
very satisfactory, for Captain Jourdain had made the voyage out 
and home in less than eleven months — a quicker return than had 
ever been made by the Company's own ships. Towards the end 
of March four vessels were dispatched to the East — the Discovery 
and London for Surat, and the Mary and William for Bantam. 
Early in June arrived the Crispian, bringing news that the Jonas 
and Swan might likewise be expected shortly. The financial 
position of the Company had now so much improved that in July 
a further division of 25 per cent, was ordered ; while a few weeks 
later the adventurers were cheered by the safe arrival of the Hopc- 
zucll in the Thames. 

In spite of all this it was evident that the flotation of a new Joint 
Stock was hopeless until the position of the Company had been 

^ Rymcr's Foedoa, vol. x.\, p. 523. 



XX COURT MINUTES 

placed on a firmer basis. Privileges dependent on a royal charter 
were under suspicion ; and moreover there were outstanding ques- 
tions as to customs and drawback which, in the present circum- 
stances, could only be settled by Parliament. It was clear, however, 
that nothing could be hoped for immediately ; and as it was 
necessary to provide funds for the dispatch of ships to the East 
during the next winter, the Committees fell back upon the plan 
of a ' Particular Voyage ' for little more than a year, on a separate 
subscription. This was approved by a General Court on August 18, 
and subscriptions were invited accordingly. To encourage applica- 
tions, it was agreed that any outsiders who underwrote for 500/. 
or upwards should be admitted to the freedom of the Company for 
a small payment (subsequently fixed at 5/.) ; and that the affairs 
of the new stock should be managed by a committee of the sub- 
scribers acting in conjunction with the regular directorate. The 
response was not entirely satisfactory, for the first list, after the dis- 
allowance of some items to which objection was raised, totalled 
only 65,000/. A further appeal to the same subscribers increased 
the amount to 80,450/. ; and it was then decided (October, 1641) 
to invite all freemen of the Company to assist in bringing up the 
total to 100,000/. To manage the stock, a committee of eight,^ 
headed by Sir Nicholas Crispe, was appointed to act in conjunction 
with the regular Court ; and to settle any difference of opinion that 
might arise between these two bodies, the former were to be re- 
inforced by another committee of the same number formed from 
members interested both in the Joint Stock and the First General 
Voyage.^ As it was not desirable for the latter to set up special 
machinery for so limited a period, an arrangement was come to by 
which use was to be made of the Joint Stock's staff, warehouses, &c., 
at a commission of one per cent, for home and six per cent, in the 
East. The Hopewell, belonging to the Joint Stock, was chartered 
by the new body, to be sent to the Coromandel Coast with a stock 
of 15,000/. Francis Day, who had recently returned from those 
parts — where he had incidentally founded, near the obscure village 
of Madraspatam, a fort (named after St. George) which was destined 

^ Termed in the Minutes the ' Mixed Committees '. 

^ This is the title by which the ' Particular Voyage ' became known at a later stage, 
and it will avoid confusion if we use it from the beginning. 



INTRODUCTION xxi 

to become famous — was appointed factor or supercargo in her, 
under a strict undertaking to have nothing to do with private trade. 
Further, on November 6 a ship was bought, which was renamed 
the Blessing and was ordered to be prepared for a voyage to Bantam ; 
while inquiries were set on foot for freighting or purchasing two 
more for Surat. 

In the midst of these preparations the Company lost its Governor, 
Sir Christopher Clitherow, who died on November ii and was 
buried a few days later in the church of St. Andrew Undershaft, 
where his monument may yet be seen. On the 26th of the same 
month his brother-in-law, Sir Henry Garway, who had been Lord 
Mayor in 1639-40, was elected to the vacant chair. There was 
much sickness in London at this time, and shortly before Christmas 
the Company lost its Secretary, Edward Sherborne. His post was 
filled by the promotion of Richard Swinglehurst, with a salary and 
allowances amounting to 160/. per annum. 

The death of Clitherow did not entail the removal of the Com- 
pany's offices from his premises, for the widow, who continued 
to live there, was glad enough to have so profitable a tenant. On 
the Company's part there was some grumbling at the inadequacy 
of the accommodation provided and the exorbitance of the rent ; 
and on two occasions inquiry was ordered to be made as to the 
possibility of getting back to Crosby Hall. However, the state 
of public affairs discouraged any expenditure in this direction ; and 
as in November, 1643, Lady Clitherow agreed to reduce the rent 
from 150/. to 100/. per annum, and to allow the Company the use 
of a little room over the treasury, the idea of making a move was 
abandoned for the present. 

Returning to 1641, we find the adventurers still looking to the 
State for assistance. In February of that year it had been decided 
to print and present to Parliament a revised version of the 
'remonstrance' of 1628; and Thomas Munn, who had been the 
draughtsman of that document, was asked to revise it for this pur- 
pose. The intention was duly carried out^ the petition this time 
being addressed to both Houses, instead of to the Commons alone. 
On May 28 — about a fortnight after the execution of Strafford — 
a special committee was appointed to prepare a statement of the 
Company's grievances for presentation to the King and Parliament. 



xxH COURT MINUTES 

A petition was accordingly laid before His Majesty in July, in reply 
to which he recommended the Company to submit an application 
for a fresh charter, promising to recommend the matter to the notice 
of the Houses. From the Commons^ Journal we learn that on 
August 24 a petition from the East India Company was read and 
considered, and that — apparently in order to remedy one of the 
grievances complained of — a conference was arranged with the 
Lords on the question of drawback on goods re-exported within 
twelve months. In October the Company decided to petition the 
House once more, with a draft bill for the confirmation of their 
existing privileges and the addition of others ; but whether this 
intention was carried out does not appear. Two months later 
a fresh petition was ordered to be presented to the King on the 
drawback question and the other favours desired by the Company 
(p. 218). This was referred by His Majesty to the consideration 
of the Lords of the Treasury (p. 230). 

In the spring of 1642 a fresh attempt was made to induce 
Parliament to interest itself in the Company's grievances. A peti- 
tion complaining of the wrongs suffered at the hands of the Dutch 
and of Courteen's Association, and representing the ill effects of tlie 
heavy duties on the import and export of East India goods, was 
presented to the House of Commons, who referred it to the Com- 
mittee on Cloth then sitting under the presidency of the younger 
Vane. To work up public feeling on the first of these topics, the 
Committees resolved to reprint the old pamphlet setting forth the 
horrors of the ' Amboyna Massacre ' ; but this was promptly and 
peremptorily prohibited by Parliament. As regards the second, 
an endeavour was made to reach an accommodation by personal 
interviews between Courteen and the Company's representatives. 
These, however, proved fruitless. Courteen was willing to put his 
stock into the General Voyage, but he insisted that the whole should 
be taken, including the three ships he was preparing to send out, 
the five which were abroad, and his goods, &c., in China ; while the 
Company would only agree to take one of the former ships (though 
he might send out the other two to fetch home his ' remains '), and 
would have nothing to do with the China venture, or in any way 
share in the losses he had already incurred. So the attempt at 
conciliation fell through. 



INTRODUCTION xxiii 

The Hopewell quitted the Downs on December 31, 1641.^ The 
Blessing ^X.?iX\.^6L for Bantam late in January, 1642, followed, a month 
or so later, by two ships for Surat, viz. the Crispian and the Aleppo 
Merchant (the latter a hired vessel). AH these were sent on account 
of the General Voyage. On March 9 it was decided that the Third 
Joint Stock should dispatch a ship to Bantam to fetch home its 
remains in pepper ; and for this purpose the Ulysses was freighted 
and sent to the East. Towards the end of April the Mary 
arrived from Bantam, having made the quickest passage on record 
of any of the Company's ships. The result was seen in the declara- 
tion of a division of 10 per cent, in cloves to the shareholders in the 
Joint Stock (June 17, 1642). In August two more ships — the 
William and the London — came home and helped to fill up the 
Company's warehouses.^ 

It was now decided to bring the Third Joint Stock to a close, 
and proposals to this effect were approved by a General Court held 
on October 14, 1642. The remains were valued at 25 per cent, 
of the capital, apart from the amount which was hoped for from the 
Dutch, which would, if received, suffice to pay ii\ per cent, more ; 
this very doubtful asset was, however, left out of account, and it was 
resolved to declare a division of 25 per cent., to be taken out either 
in calicoes or in money .^ Adventurers might, if they cared to do 
so, leave their division to form part of the capital of a new Fourth 
Joint Stock, to which they (or any other members of the Company) 
might contribute any further sums they pleased. The response 
was fairly satisfactory. By the 7th of December 40,000/. had been 
transferred in this way from the old Joint Stock to the new, and 
a further 15,000/. had been subscribed, or 55,000/. in all; by the 
19th of the same month this had been increased to 68poo/. ; and 
later still it seems to have reached a total of 76,000/. From this 
sum the Committees bought the Peter and Andrew (renamed the 
Dolphin), and three smaller vessels, the Hart, Hind, and Seajloiver, 



* See a journal of her voyage, among the Marine Records (vol. Ixv). 

^ These two vessels had now made their final voyages for the Company. The latter 
was sold in April, 1643 ; the former was broken up and replaced by a new ship of the 
same name. 

' This made a total return of 135/. per cent. — by no means a lucrative result, con- 
sidering that the stock was started in i'53i. 



xxiv COURT MINUTES 

the first of which was destined for the Coast of Coromandel, and 
the other two (hke the Dolphin) for Surat. It had also been agreed 
to dispatch the Mary under WiUiam Minors to Bantam, on account 
both of the new Joint Stock and the General Voyage. 
\ The ships sailed, it would seem, in the latter part of February 
or beginning of March, 1*543, after some trouble with the officers 
of the Parliament. On February 3, owing to some information that 
had been given, the House of Commons ordered the Mary, Sea- 
Jiower, and Hart to be detained and searched to see that they were 
not carrying out gold or English coin. Fisher, the purser of the 
Seajloiver, refused to permit the officials to rummage his vessel, 
with the result that he was called to the bar of the House, where 
he pleaded that he did not understand the nature of the warrant 
shown to him, and was thereupon released. Apparently the search 
was fruitless, for on the 9th the House directed the release of the 
three ships. Some ten days later, however, the Mary was again 
arrested by order of the Committee of the Navy and Customs, 
on the ground that the Company had not discharged their arrears 
of subsidy ; whereupon the money was paid and a sum of 100/. 
distributed among friendly ' Parlyment men'. A second 100/. was 
provided for the same purpose in April ; and in point of fact even 
this amount was exceeded. 

The minutes of the Company at this period are very guarded 
in their references to public affairs, but from time to time we hear 
echoes of the great conflict that was raging between King Charles 
and the two Houses. When, after the battle of Edgehill, the royal 
troops marched on London, the Company's ordnance at Deptford 
was ordered to be brought to the City (November 3, 1642), and 
their gun carriages were also requisitioned. In March, 1643, a Par- 
liamentary Committee requested the loan of the Company's 
ordnance to place upon the earthworks which had been hastily 
thrown up round London. There were, however, many Royalists 
among the mercantile community, while others were sore at the 
contributions levied by the two Houses ; and so, at the General 
Court held on March 8 to consider the matter, not a single hand 
was held up in favour of the loan. The demand was reiterated, 
and a second General Court on April 12 repeated the refusal; 
whereupon, it seems, the guns were taken by force under the 



INTRODUCTION xxv 

authority of an order from the Commons.^ At the same meeting 
the Deputy announced that the Company's house had been assessed 
at o^^l. a week towards the weekly contribution of 10,000/. laid 
upon the City. Their premises at Blackwall, it appears, were 
assessed at 'i^^s. per month ; and from an entry in the minutes 
of June 79 we learn that Parliament had requisitioned the one horse 
that was kept in the Company's yard at that place. Interference 
with their shipping was also feared. On March 24 it was decided 
to ask for the services of a man-of-war to escort the DolpJmt and 
Hind down the Channel ; and a month later arrangements were 
made to send out a small vessel to warn home-coming ships not 
to put into the Western ports and to avoid carefully all ' Parlyament 
shipps'. In July, 1643, we find the 'Committee for reducing 
Newcastle' endeavouring without success to induce the Company 
to lend six guns towards the equipment of the Parliamentary ships. 

A further consequence of the Civil War was the loss of the 
services of the Company's Governor, Sir Henry Garway. As 
a well-known partisan of the King, he soon fell in disfavour with 
the Houses, and on April 10, 1643, he was deprived, by order of the 
Commons, of the office of Governor of the Turkey Company or any 
other company in the City of London, and the said Companies 
were directed to choose others to take his place [Commons Jotirnal, 
vol. iii, p. 37). This order, it would seem, was ignored by the East 
India Company. Garway had, in fact, ceased to attend their courts 
after the 15th of the preceding February, and he made no attempt 
now to assert his claim ; but no successor was appointed, and the 
Deputy carried on all the necessary duties until the regular day 
of election came round (July 5, 1643). Then Cokayne was pro- 
moted to the Governor's chair, and Methwold was elected Deputy. 
The partnership thus started lasted until Methwold's death in 1653, 
when Andrew Riccard took his place. Cokayne and he then 
carried on the administration together until December, 1657, when 
a new stock was started under the charter granted by Cromwell. 
Cokayne was thus Governor for over fourteen years ; and, what 
is more, they were the darkest years in the history of the Company. 

In the same month of July, 1643, three vessels arrived from the 

* On December 29, 1643, application was ordered to be made to the City for the 

return of the ordnance lent, or payment in lieu thereof. The result will be seen later. 



xxvi COURT MINUTES 

East, viz. the Crispian'^ and the Aleppo Merchant, bringing goods 
worth 139,000/. for the General Voyage, and the Reformation, 
which had been out for nearly three years and had now brought 
back a cargo for the Joint Stock estimated at 34,000/. Nor was 
this all, for in August came the news that the Ulysses had reached 
Portsmouth with goods for both accounts. The fortunate arrival 
of this large quantity of commodities enabled the Committees 
to make a division of 125 per cent, in indigo, calicoes, and cinnamon, 
to the adventurers in the General Voyage. 

The need of settling the plans for the next season rendered urgent 
the question of increasing the capital of the Fourth Joint Stock. 
This, as we have already seen, amounted to 76,000/, the greater 
part being, not new money, but the transfer of remains of the pre- 
vious Joint Stock. Borrowing had enabled the Committees to 
spend 120,000/. in equipping the 1642-43 fleet and providing goods 
and specie for its lading. A valuation was now made of the state 
of the Stock, and in accordance therewith it was resolved on 
September 20, 1643, to increase the nominal value of each adven- 
turer's share by 20 per cent, (thus raising the capital to 91,000/.), 
and to invite further subscriptions. However, the period appointed 
went by and ' noe considerable summe ' was underwritten : where- 
upon the time was extended to January i. The further capital 
obtained seems to have been about 14,000/., for at a meeting held 
on August 28, 1645, the Governor stated that in all 105,000/. had 
been subscribed, and in Jeremy Sambrooke's account of the trade 
[Home Miscellaneous, vol. 40) we find the capital of the Fourth 
Joint Stock given as 104,540/. This was not much more than the 
sum raised for the one year's venture of the First General Voyage ; 
but it was all that could be obtained, and so the Committees went 
boldly forward, encouraged perhaps by the promise of the House 
of Commons (September 22, 1643) of assistance in remedying the 
grievances of the Company. 

This promise was made the pretext for a further demand upon 
the Company to assist the Parliamentary treasury. At a General 
Court held on November 27, 1643, the adventurers were told that 
a draft * ordinance ' against interlopers submitted by the Company 
had been read a first time in the Commons, and that a request had 

* Often styled the Crispiana in the Minutes. 



INTRODUCTION xxvii 

now been received for the loan of 10,000/., to be repaid out of the 
new excise on ' flesh and salt '. The Company had no money 
to spare ; but, rather than jeopardize the passing of the ordinance, 
it was agreed that 6,000/. should be borrowed and handed over 
to the House, on condition that it should be repaid (with 8 per cent, 
interest) within three or four months, or, failing that, the Company 
should be allowed to deduct the amount from the customs due 
on their next shipping. At the close of the year we have a further 
echo of the Civil War in an order for the payment of 264/. i6s. for 
a new imposition laid on imports in order to provide for the relief 
of Plymouth, and of another sum of 10/. assessed upon Blackwall 
Yard for the maintenance of a magazine. 

The Blessing returned in November, 1643, with a cargo of goods 
for the First General Voyage. The plans of the Committee for the 
season 1643-44 included the dispatch of the William and Blessing 
to Bantam ; of the Endeavour to the Coast of Coromandel ; and 
of the John and Crispian to Surat. Of these vessels the last- 
named and the Blessing were to be purchased by the Fourth Joint 
Stock from the First General Voyage ; while the other three had 
been specially built at Blackwall for the former Stock. The 
Endcavonr sailed at the end of November ; the rest were still pre- 
paring when the volume closes. 

There are several minor topics on which it may be worth while 
to touch before concluding. Readers of the previous volume will 
be amused to note a further instance of the effrontery of Thomas 
Smithwick, who on March 26, 1641, was again hustled out of a court 
meeting for disrespectful behaviour. He was as troublesome as 
ever during the first two years of the period,^ but death seems 
to have relieved the Company of him in the latter part of 1641 
or the early months of 1642. It will also be seen that by April, 
1643, Captain Cobb, who was held responsible for the Red Sea 
piracies of 1635, was at last laid by the heels at Rochester. In the 
following August he was still a prisoner, and the Company was 

^ In June, 1641, a petition from him, alleging mismanagement on tlie part of the 
Committees, was read in the House of Lords, when the Company was ordered to answer 
{Lords Journals, vol. iv, pp. 265, 271, 274; Fourth Report of Hist. MSS. Com., 
pp. 71, 74); but nothing further seems to have been done, and no reference is made to 
the matter in the minutes. 



xxviii COURT MINUTES 

preparing to answer a petition he had addressed to Parliament ; 
while there is another reference to his case under date of Sep- 
tember 20. Further recollections of past troubles are aroused 
by the references to an expedition to Madagascar. Details were 
given in the last volume of the schemes for colonizing that island 
put forward under the auspices first of Prince Rupert and then 
of the Earl of Arundel. These came to nothing ; but in 1642 they 
were revived by John Bond, who had been prominent in the former 
preparations/ and had then obtained a royal warrant for the venture, 
dated March 29, 1639. In December, 1642, he announced to the 
Committees his intention of sailing for Madagascar with 250 men 
and 40 women to form a colony ; whereupon it was determined 
to appeal to Parliament to stop his ship, on the ground that 
he might commit acts of piracy, or at all events might spoil the 
island as a place of call for the Company's ships. The question 
was referred by the Commons to the Committee of Trade, on whose 
report (February 13, 1643) it was resolved that Bond should be 
allowed to proceed on his voyage, but should before sailing give 
security to do nothing that would injure the Company's interests. 

Among miscellaneous points to be noted in this volume are : 
the allusions on pp. 17, 23 to Mandelslo, the German traveller, and 
on pp. ^6, &c., to Gilles Rezimont, a French captain who was 
brought home as a prisoner by the Discovery in June, 1640 : the 
statement made on p. 137 that the customs revenue from the East 
India trade amounted to 30,000/. per annum : the resolution of the 
Company to discontinue the title of ' Captain ' and employ in 
future only 'Masters' (p. 119) and an invention submitted to the 
Court for extracting fresh water from salt (p. iii). The fact that 
seven o'clock in the morning was fixed upon as a suitable hour 
at which to interview a Secretary of State reminds us that no 
legislative enactment was needed to induce our ancestors to make 
the most of the daylight. There are many interesting references 
to Blackwall Yard and Poplar Hospital, particularly those on 
pp. 251, 252 relating to the grant of land behind the latter institu- 
tion for the building of a chapel ; also to the draining of Blackwall 

1 It was to him that Walter Hamond in 1643 dedicated his Madagascar, the Richest 
and most Frtiitfull Island in the World; a work written especially to recommend the 
colonization of the island. 



INTRODUCTION xxix 

Marsh (pp. 165, 166). Deptford Yard, we note, was ordered in June, 
1643, to be sold. On p. 315 is mentioned the discontinuance 
of the ancient custom of compounding with the King's grocer for 
spices which the Company was supposed to supply for use in the 
royal household. Finally, we have an amusing incident on p. 2H4, 
where it is recorded that John Woodall, the Company's Surgeon- 
General, was accused of reboiling the salves returned from the 
Indies and then supplying them to the Company again at full 
prices. This he indignantly denied, but he confessed that he used 
them in his hospital practice ' for the cureing of poore people '. 
The present volume, by the way, sees the last of this worthy old 
surgeon, for he died on August 38, 1643 (Richard Smith's 
Obittiary). 

It should perhaps be added that the remarks made in the preface 
to the previous volume concerning the general plan of the work 
apply equally to this instalment ; and that the index has been com- 
piled by Miss Sainsbury, who has also borne the chief part of the 
burden of proof-reading. 



CORRIGENDA 

Page 89, line 19. For 'James' read'' Jonas'. 
» 95> jj 33- -^<''' purser's mate r^fl(/ purser. 
j> 97> » 24. -F(3r Ingham read Ingram. 
„ 160, ,, 23. /br Barres rma' Barnes. 
>> 3*^2, ,, 18. /^^r Richard ^iffldi' Robert. 



The following errors occur in the MS. itself. 
Page 61, line 19. Thomas should be William Spurstowe. 
,, 61, ,, 21. William j-/z^«/(/ ^£? George Francklyn, 
,, 23S, „ 34. Richard j/^(7?</(2' /^e John Langley. 
,, 28S, ,, 26. Hore should be Howe. 
» S^ij >j 22. Thomas ^/^£»«W (5d John Harris. 



COURT MINUTES, ETC. 

OF THE 

EAST INDIA COMPANY. 

The Company's Black Book, 1624-55 {Home Miscellaneous, 
vol. xxix). 

A record of the ' errors and misdemeanors ' of the Company's 
servants. The entries for 1640-43 occupy ff. 28-36. The persons 
mentioned are : Guy Bath, Mark Bromely, Henry Chapman, 
Thomas Clarke, Andrew Coggan, Thomas Covvly, William Gibson, 
Richard Hudson, John Hunter, Thomas Ivy, John Jefferies, Thomas 
Keeling, Thomas Merry, Captain Mynors, Henry Olton, John 
Peirson, Diggory Penkevill, Gerald Pinson, — Robinson, Thomas 
Rogers, Humphrey Weston, George Willoughby, John Yard. (15//.) 

A Court of Committees, January 3, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 108). 

The dispute between Susan Ayleworth, administratrix of George 
Sill, and Anne, wife of William Peirce, one of the Company's 
factors in India, about their interest in 301 rials of eight, part of 
Henry Sill's estate remaining in the Company's hands, having been 
by consent of all parties deferred until Christopher Read and 
Ralph Cartwright have been examined concerning it, notwith- 
standing which agreement Susan Ayleworth endeavours to obtain 
the money, the Court orders that nothing be paid until after the 
said examination. The preamble^ being read, Mr. Cradock reports 
that many adventurers except against the government of the 
Company, advising that the ' governors ' be reduced in number 
before the preamble is divulged, and that a General Court be 

* To the proposed list of those willing to subscribe to a fresh Joint Stock. It consti- 
tuted what would now be called the 'prospectus' of the Stock. The document is 
abstracted on p. 9. 

S.C.M. n B 



a COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

called to resolve upon the matter ; this Mr. Cradock considers 
would induce many more to adventure in the New Stock. After 
much dispute it is resolved to engross the preamble as it stands, 
and to desire Lord Cottington to present it to the King for His 
Majesty's further directions. The Court resolves to enlarge its 
New Year's gifts, and orders 44/. to be delivered to Mr. Sherburne 
to be by him discharged and accounted for, in addition to the 50/. 
already given to Mr. Secretary Coke, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees, January 6, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 103). 

Mr. Methwold reports that the Conde de Lynhares, late Viceroy 
of Goa, caused 3,000 seraphins^ to be paid into the Company's 
cash at Surat, with the request that the proceeds thereof should be 
sent to England, and the Company entreated to buy him a coach 
and six horses ; but that now, being poor, he desires the money 
returned ; a reply is promised after the Surat books have been 
examined. The Mary not to break bulk in the Downs, but to be 
brought into the river next spring [tide]. Letter read from Henry 
Chapman, factor in Persia, to his brother in London, about some 
rhubarb sent home in the Alary by Thomas Fitch, steward's mate 
in that ship ; the rhubarb is ordered to be detained. The suit 
begun long ago against Thomas Kennaston and others, and stopped 
by command of the King, is now ordered to be continued, His 
Majesty and the Lords of the Council consenting to the ordinary 
course of justice being taken ; Messrs. Ashwell and Abbott are 
directed to inform Sir Henry Martyn of this, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees, January 8, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 104). 

Mr. Martin Finder transfers 225/. adventure and profits in the 
Third Joint Stock, with a dividend of 28/. 2s. 6d., and an arrear of 
20s. for late payment, to John HoUoway, Esq. The Mary is to be 
brought over the flats to the accustomed port at Erith. John 
Younge to be supplied with 200/. to defray necessary expenses at 
Sandwich. Thomas Steevens is chosen master of the Crispian, 

^ A silver coin current at Goa and other Portuguese settlements. On the present 
occasion it was reckoned as equivalent in value to half a rial of eight. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 3 

designed for Surat, at a salary of 8/. per month, on condition that 
he expects no other allowance or gratification. Michael Yates, 
formerly master of the Advice, is chosen master of the Stuaii, 
designed for Bantam, at a salary of 20 nobles per month. John 
Hall, Humphrey Pynn, and John Jay have offered to go in 
command of the Jonas, designed for Bantam ; but as Jay is not 
present, the election is deferred. A motion to send two more ships 
to Bantam, in regard of the large amount of pepper and goods 
provided there, is generally disapproved of, the Caesar, Jonas, and 
Szvan being thought sufficient, and Mr. Methwold advising the 
Court to await the arrival of the ship expected in May and then to 
decide according to the advices sent by Mr. Muschampe. John 
Catterell's bill of i/. 8j-. 9^., for viewing plank and elm timber in 
Essex, to be paid. Mr. Methwold reports that had the Mary not 
met with Captain Wills, who supplied her with cordage, she would 
have had difficulty in getting home ; therefore on his advice a large 
supply of cordage is ordered to be sent in the ships. The Jonas 
to be supplied with 100 pigs of lead for kintledge. James Martyn 
and Richard Norton accepted by the balloting-box as securities for 
Sinda cloth and sallampores. Silk delivered to Messrs. Trott and 
Davies, to be rated at the same price and time as that sold to 
Mr. Middleton. (3i//.) 

A Court of Committees, January 10, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. no). 

The Court, being reminded of the King of Bantam's request to 
be supplied with muskets, powder, and shot, directs the Secretary 
to draw up a petition to King Charles for leave to buy and 
transport the same. Custom on unclaimed calicoes brought home 
as private trade in the Mary to be paid. Mr. Smithwick to 
receive ^l. ds. Sd. for brokerage on a contract for gum-lac made 
by him for Michael Castell with the Company. John Jay enter- 
tained master of the Jonas at 10/. per month, and, in regard of 
this large salary, not to expect any other gratification but the 
customary loc/. given to commanders and masters of ships making 
the Downs their first port ; this to be forfeited, and punishment to 
follow, if any private trade or other goods be taken from the ship 
before its arrival at Erith. The workmen in the Jonas to be given 



4 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

beer and a penny loaf each at dinner, ' the better to keepe them 
abord theis short daies.' Michael Hazard, who came home in the 
Mary, and has lost his sight, is allowed to enter the Almshouse at 
Poplar. {\\pp) 

A Court of Committees, January 15, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. III). 

Mr. Mun presents for consideration a petition to the General 
Court, with a declaration of some overture for the better managing 
of the trade to the East Indies, sent to him in a letter by Richard 
Boothby. It is proposed that Arthur Daintree, being well re- 
commended and of good ability, shall go in Captain Jourdain's 
ship [the Caesar\ which has been hired by freight, with liberty to 
send a merchant or two in her ; but as he asks 120/. per annum as 
salary, which is thought too much (he never having been in India), 
his entertainment is deferred. Thomas Steevens, master of the 
Crispian, is much blamed for sending home in the Mmy 447 pieces 
of calicoes to his wife, seeing he could not be ignorant of the 
Company's orders ; and the Court directs that the said calicoes be 
brought to the warehouse, when further consideration shall be had 
of the matter. Twenty broadcloths to be bought for Bantam. 
Captain Jourdayne to be granted the Company's commission under 
the broad seal, and allowed to borrow one of its journals for his 
better direction in the voyage ; also to be paid the 50/. sanctioned 
for his setting out to sea. The following officers are appointed : 
Thomas Thomblins, as purser of the Crispian, with Edward 
Kinnersly as mate; John Jefferies as purser of the Jonas, with 
William Garth as his mate ; George Byle, servant to Mr. Cram- 
porne, of Plymouth, as purser of the Swan, with Bell Potter as his 
mate ; Thomas Fitch as steward of the Crispian, with Henry 
Bassano as his mate ; Thomas Taylor as steward of the Jonas, 
with John Hodgeson as his mate ; and John Bourne as steward's 
mate in the Swan. Provision of cordage for supply of the five 
small ships at Surat, and a competent proportion of tempered stuff 
for trimming the ships, as well to the northward as to the south- 
ward,^ to be resolved on at the next court. (2^ pp.) 

1 The ' northward ' meant the factories in Western India and Persia ; the ' southward ' 
those at Bantam and its dependencies, including Masulipatam. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 5 

The Mission of Anthony Van Den Heuvel to Holland, 
January 15, 16^0 {Public Record Office : Dom. 67^^?i-. /, vol. ccccxlii, 
No. 6). 

Warrant to the exchequer to pay Anthony Van Den Heuvel 
3C0/. without account, for secret service. {Docguet.) 

A Court of Committees, January 17, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 113). 

Mr. Treasurer is directed to pay Mr. Cradock 300/., to buy cloth 
for dispatch this year. Richard Harvy, recommended by the Earl 
of Dorset, is chosen steward for the Szvan. A dispute between 
John Thomas and Robert Wilby is referred to the next court. 
Alderman Gayre and Messrs. Styles and Mun are desired to go 
jointly or by turns to Blackvvall and hasten the preparation of the 
three ships, especially the Crispian, that she may be ready to sail 
for the northwards by the end of March. Messrs. Fotherby, 
Swanly, Steevens, and Southan are directed to send in a written 
report of all damages caused by the Caesar at Blackwall Dock, 
that satisfaction may be demanded from Captain Jourdayne and her 
other owners. The Court orders that Merritt be paid 25/., instead 
of the usual 20/., for his great care in piloting the Mary with his 
ketch from the Downs to Erith ; but Merritt refuses this sum as 
insufficient, on account of the loss he has sustained by not using 
the ketch this fishing season, and desires further consideration. 
Mr. Smith, an officer of the Admiralty, brings a writ for arrest of 
Mr. Cobb, late master of the Samaritan, and desires assistance in 
serving it ; whereupon Thomas Corne is directed to use all possible 
diligence in helping him. Mr. Methwold presents a packet of 
letters brought home in the Mary for the Dutch East India 
Company ; whereupon they are delivered to Mr. Lucy, the said 
Company's merchant. Mr. Methwold relates that when in Goa he 
received many courtesies from a Portuguese named Don Phiilippo 
de Mascarinas, through whose favour he was better enabled to do 
the Company service in those parts. Mascarinas entrusted to his 
care a piece of ambergris, w^cighing about 600 oz., and a parcel of 
rough diamonds to the value of 600/., to sell to the best advantage 
in England, and return the proceeds by bill of exchange to Lisbon 



6 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

to persons mentioned in a writing in Portuguese under his hand. 
Mr. Methvvold states that he has entered the ambergris and 
diamonds in the Custom-house and paid custom for them, not 
wishing to take them himself without first obtaining the sanction 
of the Court ; whereupon the Governor asks if the said goods 
really belong to the Portugal ; on Mr. Methwold solemnly pro- 
testing that they do, order is given for them to be delivered to 
him, and the Court expresses a desire to see them. Mr. Cappur is 
directed to provide sails for the ships. On considering the advices 
from Bantam and Surat, fifteen tons of cables and small cordage, and 
five tons of tempered stuff are ordered to be provided for the north- 
wards, and twenty tons of cordage with ten tons of tempered stuff 
for Bantam. Mr. Yates, master of the Sivan, proposes that, for 
' the better defence of his shippe against an enimy and to scowre 
the decks upon a close fight ', he may be provided with two small 
pieces of ordnance of four or five cwt. each ; the Court, approving 
of this, orders Mr. Rilston to provide the said ordnance for the 
Jonas and Crispian as well as for the Swan, and to fit them with 
carriages and all things necessary. Lady Hamersly to receive free 
of freight two small cabinets and ten pieces of calicoes sent her by 
her son-in-law, Mr. Coggan. Mr. Steevenson, the wharfinger, to be 
paid 300/. on account of 50c/. due unto him for wharfage, &c. 

{?,PP-) 

A Court of Committees, January 20, 1640 {Co2/rt Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 117). 

Alvoro Semedo, a Portuguese Jesuit, desiring liberty to receive 
musk and China roots brought home in the Majy, for which he has 
paid custom and is willing to pay freight, he is told that the said 
goods must first be brought to the Exchange cellar to be viewed. 
Similar directions are given concerning Mr. Methvvold's goods. The 
Court orders a watch and three rings to be delivered to Anne 
Willoughby, widow of John Willoughby, deceased in Persia. (^ p.) 

A Court of Committees, January 23, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 118), 

An order is read from the Lords of the Council concerning the 
alteration of the preamble, which by the said order is referred to 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 7 

the consideration of the Sub-Committees and Farmers of Customs.^ 
Mr, Governor, Mr. Deputy, and the Committees formerly nominated 
are desired to meet the said Sub-Committees and Farmers this 
afternoon at Sir William Russell's accordingly. John Thomas and 
Robert Wilby appearing with their witnesses, the Court hears them 
patiently ; and seeing that the allegations contained in the petition 
now presented in the name of all the carpenters employed at 
Blackwall (whom Wilby caused to leave their work and to come 
into court in a mutinous manner and falsely assert the detention of 
their wages and other wrongs) cannot be substantiated, resolves to 
proceed legally against the men, and to bind them over to appear 
at the Sessions to answer for their unwarrantable behaviour ; but, 
on their submitting and promising to return quietly to work, it is 
resolved to overlook their offence. Thomas and Wilby also submit 
themselves and are ordered each to withdraw his action, Wilby to 
pay Thomas 10s. and both to become friends. The Mary being 
nearly unladen, Mr. Sambrooke is directed to make out warrants 
for payment of her mariners, and to clear their accounts if nothing 
is found against them. James Martyn, John Buxton, and John 
Richardson accepted by the balloting-box as securities for salam- 
pores. Charles Leake, master of the Sea/wrsc, Henry Read, 
master of the Grace, and John Bennett, master of the Hart, refuse 
to accept the offer made them for freight of their said ships sent to 
Gore-end to lighten the Mary ; the Court, not quite believing the 
alleged tonnage of the three ships, desires Messrs. Southam and 
Steevens to examine them, and on their report satisfaction shall be 
given. Resolved, on the proposal of Mr. Deputy, to send 160,000 
rials of eight this year to the Indies in the Crispian, JoJias, and 
Swan ', and Mr. Treasurer is desired to provide the same. Mr. Cord- 
well to be given all the Company's defective powder to mend, for 
which he is to be paid, as usual, 3^. per lb. (2 pp.) 

' The draft preamble for a new subscription was considered at a meeting of the Privy 
Council on January 15, when it was referred to the Sub-Committees previously appointed. 
Their reply was read at a meeting held on the 19th, and it was ordered that the Sub- 
Committees should confer with the East India Company on the subject. {Privy Council 
Registers.) 



8 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, January 24, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 120). 

Payment ordered of three bills of exchange from Cowes, 
amounting to 89/. y. 4^., for provisions for the Hopewell and 
Advice. The wife of William Hall, a factor in Persia, to be paid 
the sum due unto her on account of her husband's salary. Wages, 
amounting to 116/. is. id., for the last week at Blackwall, to be 
paid. The account of Edward Falkoner, late purser in the Blessing, 
amounting to 186/. 14^. 4d., ordered to be cleared. Mr. Acton's 
bill of 5/. 5i-. 6d. for law causes to be paid. Forty-eight ' skynns or 
fardles ' of cinnamon and seventy-two pieces of ' callico lawnes ' to 
be delivered to Mr. Methwold, he submitting the freight to the 
Court's decision. Mr. Methwold advising that broadcloth will sell 
at Surat, Messrs. Spurstowe and Cradock are entreated to buy 
150 pieces, taking Meth wold's advice as to price and colour. 
William Baily, late commander of the Mary, is given 100/. for 
bringing her direct to the Downs, and twelve fardles of cinnamon 
are ordered to be delivered to him, he referring the freight to the 
consideration of the Court. John Webster's petition to be ware- 
housekeeper with Mr. Charke at the Exchange cellar is denied, 
Richard Swinglehurst having been appointed in Mr. Chauncy's 
place and given the keys of the said cellar. (li//.) 

Order of His Majesty in Council, dated at Whitehall, 
January 26, 1640 {^Public Record Office : East Indies, vol. iv B, 
no. 73). 

The King in Council this day ordered the East India Company 
to fully reimburse the Earl of Southampton and the adventurers 
with him for the charge they have been at in preparing and 
adequately furnishing a large vessel to make a plantation on the 
island of Mauritius (for which enterprise His Majesty's letters 
patents have been obtained), which ship has been ready some 
months but is stayed by the King's commands upon the suggestions 
and pretences of the said Company, to His Lordship's great and 
daily cost ; otherwise His Majesty will give order and licence for 
the said ship to proceed on her voyage. {Copy. \ p.) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 9 

'A [draft] Preamble to a Subscripcion for a newe 

JOYNT StOCKE to THE EAST INDIES, PERSIA, &C.', JANUARY 28, 
1640 {^Public Record Office : East Indies, vol. iv B^ no. 74). 

The Company having been directed several times by the General 
Court to draw home its estate from abroad and to wind up the 
Third Joint Stock, because of the many discouragements lately 
received, and having by petitions and a remonstrance presented to 
the King declared the necessity of His Majesty's powerful and 
speedy direction for the continuance of so important a trade, His 
Majesty, after debating the causes of these discouragements with 
his Lords in Council, was graciously pleased to signify his desire 
that the said trade should be continued and supported, and pro- 
mised it his royal help and favour, as appears by an Order in 
Council of the loth of December, 1639. According to this Order 
and to encourage the adventurers about to underwrite in the 
intended Joint Stock to proceed, as the trade in India is now in 
a better condition than it has been for many years, on account of 
the great increase of wares since the late famine and pestilence, the 
following preamble has been drawn up : First, that for the better 
government of the intended Joint Stock (the payments for which 
are to be spread over four years) it shall be lawful for the majority 
at a General Court to direct how and by whom the said Joint 
Stock shall be managed and to chose the said managers yearly. 
Secondly, that the book of subscription shall remain open for all, 
as well English as 'strangers', dwelling in or near the city of 
London until the 25th of March next, and to all others His 
Majesty's subjects and strangers whatsoever until the ist of May 
next, and then be closed and no one allowed to underwrite or to 
enlarge his subscription without the consent of a majority at 
a General Court ; that each annual payment, after the closing of 
the book, be made quarterly at Midsummer, Michaelmas, Christmas, 
and the last at Lady Day in the year 1641, and so every said 
quarter day for the three ensuing years until the whole subscription 
is brought in ; that all subscriptions be paid to the Treasurer of the 
Company for the time being, or to his deputy. Thirdly, that if the 
new adventurers do not pay in their moneys according to their 
several subscriptions at the aforesaid time, or within thirty days 



10 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

after, they shall pay to the Treasurer, or his deputy, for the use of 
the Company, a fine of ;^os. a month for every too/, so due, as such 
non-payment may cause great damage and confusion to the 
intended voyages. Fourthly, that no Englishman shall subscribe 
less than 500/. in this intended Joint Stock, and no foreigner less 
than 1,000/. Fifthly, any Englishman buying an adventure after 
the book has been closed, not having previously subscribed, shall 
pay a fine of 20/. for his freedom, and a stranger doing so shall pay 
a fine of 40/. Sixthly, to avoid all disturbance in the trade by there 
being two East India Companies at one and the same time, the old 
Company shall have a convenient time, according to its charter, to 
bring its stock home, and after next May shall send no more to the 
East Indies, Persia, or the Southwards beyond the Cape Bona 
Sperance.^ {Copy. i| pp) 

A Court of Committees, January 29, 1640 {Couri Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 121). 

Mr. Cradock to be given 800/. to buy cloths. Two thousand 
pieces of calicoes at icy. and 12s. per piece and two thousand at 
14^-. and 165. per piece to be delivered to Messrs. Briggs and Oneby 
for transportation. Mr. Rilston to pay the coachman's bill of 8/. 
for eight days' service in taking the Committees to and from Erith. 
Mr. Young to pay for six butts of beer had from His Majesty's ship 
the Unicorn for use in the Mary. John Cappur directed to get 
advice how to recover a bale of silk missing from the barque 
Henry. Nicholas, son of Alderman Backhouse, admitted to the 
freedom of the Company by patrimony. A gentleman appears 

^ The following document (No. 74 1) is a duplicate of the preceding with these 
additions in Nicholas's hand : to the first condition set forth in the preamble is added 
that the number of Managers or Committees is not to exceed twelve (in addition to the 
Governor), seven of whom must be present when any business is to be concluded; the 
Governor to be allowed to appoint any one of the twelve as his deputy in case of 
sickness ; these Committees may from time to time appoint Sub-Committees from 
freemen of the generality, who are to give account to the Committees of all business 
referred to them ; the Governor and five of the Committees to be changed every year, the 
same Governor not to be allowed to hold that post for two years together. To the 
fourth condition is added that as many as will may join in the adventure of 500/., but one 
only shall be free and have a vote in the said Company, and on subscribing shall name 
all his partners, the accounts to be kept severally for such of them as shall desire it. 
The preamble as finally approved (incorporating these additions) is entered on the 
minutes of the Privy Council under date of January 29. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY it 

from the Earl Marshal on behalf of Mr. Langer, administrator to 
the late Mr. Wilford,^ who was employed in Persia by the Earl, to 
receive such estate as is due on the said Wilford's account, which 
he alleges is about 86/. I2j". ; this sum is ordered to be paid to the 
Earl on the administrator giving a discharge for it, the Court noting 
that at the closing of the Surat books one Ambertson had received 
50/. of the said sum. The Lord Mayor acquaints the Court with 
a reference from the King to Sir Paul Pinder and Mr. Halstead to 
join with two of the Company and settle its dispute with James Cox ; 
the Lord Mayor and Alderman Abdy, having before ' taken paynes ' 
in this business, are considered fittest to undertake it again. 
Mr. Deputy and certain Committees are entreated to attend the 
King this afternoon, when the preamble is to be presented to His 
Majesty. (li //.) 

A Court of Committees, January 31, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 122). 

Mr. Nicholas, Clerk of the Council, given 10/., and his clerk 
40J., in recognition of services done the Company in drawing up 
the preamble and divers orders. Mr. Secretary Coke given ic/. 
for procuring the King's licence to transport muskets, powder, and 
shot as a present for the King of Bantam. Committees appointed 
to answer all petitions for remission of freight on private trade 
brought home in the Mary. Alderman Gayre and Messrs. Styles 
and Mun requested to view the stores and provisions supplied by 
the Londo7i to the Mary on her homeward voyage,^ and to make 
such return as they shall think fit, and have the same sent to the 
London by the next ships. Andrew Smally to be treated with 
for elm timber and other materials needed at Blackwall Yard. 
A warrant having been procured from the King to send 300 
muskets, 150 barrels of powder, and 1,000 iron shot to the King 
of Bantam, Alderman Gayre and Mr. Kerridge are desired to pro- 
vide and see the same shipped. The preamble, drawn up by 
Mr. Nicholas according to the King's directions, being read, the 
Court observes that no power is given the Governor in case of ill- 
ness to nominate a Deputy, without whom no court can be held ; 

* See the previous volume, p. 251. 

' See Mandelslo's Travels, English edition of 1662, p. 253. 



la COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

whereupon the Secretary is desired to acquaint the Lords with this 
omission, that it may be rectified. Wages at Blackwall for the 
present week, amounting to 172/. i6j-, 8^., to be paid. {^\pp) 

Samuel Cordwell to the Council, February 4, 1640 
{Public Record Office : Dom. Chas. /, vol. ccccxHv, no. 22). 

It is humbly offered for your consideration : — 1. That the home- 
made saltpetre falls short about eighty lasts to make 240 lasts 
yearly, and therefore if you think fit, now that the East India 
Company are suitors for some privileges, they may be covenanted 
with to bring over a certain quantity of saltpetre yearly, at the rate 
they have formerly sold it for to the King. \]\^argin : It is held 
fit that when the charter shall be passed there be a clause to enjoin 
the East India Company accordingly.] {Extract only. 

IP) 

A Court of Committees, February 5, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 124). 

The widow and executrix of the late John Willoughby to be 
paid 50/. of his estate now in the Company's hands. Mr. Methwold 
requests that the money paid into the Company's cash at Surat in 
1637 by the Conde de Lynhares may be returned to him with the 
interest due thereon ; the Court, hearing from Mr. Markham, 
the Auditor, that according to the accounts now returned in the 
Mary the said money was really paid in at Surat, orders that it be 
reduced into rials of eight at the rate of 6s. per rial, and paid to 
Mr. Methwold in discharge of both principal and interest ; this the 
latter thinks will content the Viceroy. The preamble is considered, 
and a question raised whether it shall be read at the next General 
Court, some conceiving that it does not so much concern the 
present adventurers in the old Stock as those who shall come in 
upon the new subscription, for which, by this preamble, both 
English and 'straingers' may underwrite. The Court is of opinion 
that it should not be made known to the General Court, which 
is only summoned to be informed of the goods returned home, 
to give directions for their disposal, and to consent to the dispatch 
of the intended stock. The King having promised by order of the 
loth of December last that Lord Cottington should come and 
inform the generality of his Majesty's gracious favour and good 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 13 

intentions to the Company for its better encouragement in prose- 
cuting its trade, and His Lordship being unable through indisposi- 
tion to do so, the Secretary is directed to wait on him and ascertain 
his pleasure, and to whom to apply in case he cannot come. 
Edward Knightly, Edward Wastfeild, and George Warner, formerly 
apprenticed to Mr. George Clarke, are admitted to the freedom 
of the Company by service, each paying 20s. to the poor-box. 
The Court desiring information of the Company's estate and con- 
dition, as well for payment of the debts owing at interest as for 
satisfaction of the next General Court, Mr. Sambrooke reads 
a calculation he has made, showing that the Company has ' within 
the land sufficient to pay their debts, and about 72,000/., not 
including the charges of the three shipps now intended to bee sent 
out this spring'. Hereupon debate ensues, and it is agreed by 
erection of hands that a division of 25 per cent, in Persia raw silk 
be made to each adventurer, and no more divisions declared till all 
debts at interest are fully paid ; also that if, after this division 
is distributed and the three ships dispeeded, the Company is 
indebted about ioo,goc/, more than it has at home, it shall assure 
for this sum. Those not taking their division in silk to be paid in 
money at ' midsomer next come two yeares ' ; all the silk to be first 
underwritten for, (2-J pp.) 

A Court of COxMmittees, February 7, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 126). 

Humphrey Hill, formerly apprenticed to William Spurstowe, 
is admitted to the freedom of the Company by service, paying 10s. 
to the poor-box. Captain Styles reporting that the proportion 
of powder and iron shot (forty or fifty rounds) usually sent in the 
ships is more than is now necessary, by reason of the late peace 
made with the Portuguese, the Court orders that the Crispian, 
Jonas, and Sivan be supplied with thirty rounds only, according 
to the number of their ordnance. After some debate it is resolved 
to inform the generality this afternoon of the arrival of the Mary ; 
that her goods are safely landed and warehoused ; and that, accord- 
ing to custom, in token of the Company's thankfulness, a sermon 
is to be preached at St. Andrew's Undershaft ; also that a division 
of 25 per cent, in Persia silk, equally sorted and divided at 20j-. 



14 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

per lb., is to be given to each adventurer ; that the amount of quick 
stock thought requisite to be sent in the three ships to enable the 
goods now abroad to be brought home is in all 50,000/., to be 
valued here at the rate of 5^-. the rial of eight. Mr. Cordwell 
requests abatement on the last saltpetre bought of the Company 
at 4/. per hundred, some of which he finds upon trial to be bad and 
not worth los. per hundred ; this is refused, he having viewed and 
had a sample of it before buying, and Harris, the deputy saltpetre 
man, having bought some of the same and found it very good ; 
moreover, if liberty had been given for transportation of the said 
saltpetre, it could have been sold in Holland for 5/. per hundred 
or more. A Court of Sales appointed to be held this day fortnight. 
Consideration had of the debt of 75/. charged in the account of the 
late President Rastall to Nathaniel Wich. Mr. Methwold relates 
that when at Surat he examined the accounts and found that 
Rastall had by mistake charged Wich with 3,600 rupees, 600 
of which should rightly have been put to Nathaniel Mountny's 
account ; whereupon Sambrooke and Markham are directed to 
examine and report on the said accounts, that justice may be done 
Mr. Wich. Samuel, son of Mr. Bigley Carleton, admitted to the 
freedom of the Company by patrimony, paying 20s. to the poor- 
box. Robert Gale, formerly servant to Mr. George Francklyn, 
admitted by service, paying a similar amount. John Spiller's bill 
of 15/. los. 6d., for discharging the Marys goods, to be paid. The 
petition of Jane Chambers, administratrix of Anthony Ott, deceased 
in the Indies, to be paid 50/. from Ott's estate, is granted on the 
recommendation of Sir Henry Martyn, who, from Cappur's report, 
thinks that the said Ott was non compos mentis when he made his 
will. Stephen Russen, a Poleander, who came home in the Maty 
and has served the Company twelve months without wages, to be 
given 20 nobles. Richard Parks, formerly steward in the Hopewell, 
John Clarke, George Miller, and Robert Sparrow, all in the said 
ship, being commanded to go ashore for provisions, and foul weather 
preventing their return, the Hopexuell sailed without them, taking 
their clothing and other provisions, to their great loss ; on hearing 
this, the Court directs that they be given passage on the ships 
intended for Bantam, and on arrival be taken into their former 
places in the Hopewell, {^pp.) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 15 

A General Court, February 7, 1640 {Co7irt Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 130). 

Mr. Deputy (the Governor being ill) acquaints the generality 
that they are called together to be told of the happy arrival of the 
Mary and of the safe delivery of her goods into the warehouse, for 
which blessing a sermon of thanksgiving to God is to be preached 
next Thursday fortnight by Mr. Shute at St. Andrew's Undershaft, 
when as many as can are desired to be present. The goods brought 
home in the Mary are valued at about 150,000/., and a Court 
of Sales is to be held this day fortnight to dispose of them. Three 
of the Company's ships and one hired upon freight have been pre- 
pared for dispatch this spring, namely, the Caesar, the Jonas, and 
the Swan for Bantam, and the Crispian for Surat ; and in them 
it is proposed to send 15,000/. quick stock to Bantam, and 35,000/. 
to Surat (no more stock to be dispeeded after this) ; for which the 
approval of this court is necessary. It is also resolved 'to divide 
a fourth parte of a capitall, vidt. 25/. per cent, to every adventurer 
according to his stock ', in silk at 20^-. per lb., on condition that they 
receive no more until the Company's debts are paid, and if there 
is not sufificient silk the shortage is to be paid in money at Mid- 
summer next come two years; those coming first to be served first. 
The generality desiring to know how the Company's affairs stand, 
the Auditor and the Accountant report that there will be 70,000/. 
remaining after payment of all debts, but on the four ships being 
supplied and the dividend issued, the Company will be indebted 
100,000/. ; and for this sum Mr. Deputy declares a policy of assur- 
ance is to be made, as was done on a former occasion ; also that 
three ships are expected home from Bantam and one from Surat, 
with sufficient stock to enable the Company to pay off all its debts. 
Thereupon the generality agrees by erection of hands to the above- 
mentioned proposals. Many adventurers being away and so igno- 
rant of the recent decision, it is resolved that only those who wish 
to take their divisions in silks for transportation may underwrite for 
them, and others must wait until this day fortnight. In reply 
to a question as to when the preamble for subscription of a new 
stock is to be set out, answer is made that it is expected that the 
King will send one of his Lords to the General Court some time 



i6 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

next week to signify the favours His Majesty proposes to confer on 
the Company for its encouragement. Complaint is made that 
Mr. Chauncy has embezzled pepper and has not been called 
to account ; to which it is replied that he has been questioned and 
is suspended from employment till further inquiry. (3 pp.) 

A Court of Committees, February 12, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 133). 

It is resolved that, in addition to the sermon of thanksgiving 
to be preached for the arrival of the Mary, 10/. be distributed to 
the poor widows of Stepney whose husbands have died in the 
Company's service ; also that Mr. Shute be given 5/., as before, for 
his sermon, and Mr. Mason, minister of St. Andrew's Undershaft, 
5/. for distribution to the officers of the church and the poor of the 
parish. Captain Jourdaine reporting the readiness of the Caesar, 
eight chests of rials of eight are ordered to be sent in her for 
Bantam, and thirty barrels of powder, the latter to be delivered to 
the King of Bantam. Three hundred broadcloths, of colour and 
price advised by Mr. Methwold, to be sent in the Crispian for 
Surat ; for which purpose Mr. Cradock is to be given 1,00c/. in 
addition to what he has already received. Richard Beale, merchant 
and executor to the late Richard Beale, transfers 600/. adventure in 
the Third Joint Stock with all profits, on which 75/. is divided 
with an arrear of i6j-. 6d. for late payment, to Robert Gale, 
merchant, who in his turn transfers 250/. adventure ' in this present 
Joynt Stock, whereof is divided 25/. per cent.', to Edward Wastfeild, 
merchant. Mr. Martyn's proposal concerning defective calicoes 
is referred to Messrs. Spurstovve and Francklyn. Upon the recom- 
mendation of Captain Jourdayne, John Stallon is given 25/. in 
satisfaction of his demands, he having complained of his wages 
(20 nobles a month for six months) when last employed by the 
Company. A letter from Thomas Chauncy being read, the 
Secretary is directed to reply that the Committees have heard 
of many abuses committed by him which they are unwilling to 
believe ; they therefore beg him to deal openly and fairly with them, 
which will tend to his more favourable treatment and save con- 
siderable expense. Some of the large quantity of iron shot at 
Blackwall is ordered to be send in the Crispian to Surat, Mr. Meth- 



EAST INDIA COMPANY r; 

wold advising that it will there sell to good profit. The request of 
Edward Abbott that his mother may receive lo/. a year from his 
wages is granted. Thomas Bowling, who came home a passenger 
in the Mary^ is given 40s. from the poor-box. (3 //.) 

A Court of Committees, February 14, 1640 [Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 136). 

Sir William Russell and Sir Paul Pinder desiring to meet some 
of the Committees next Saturday at Sir William's house, to 
examine Richard Wild's petition against the Company exhibited 
to the King ^, Alderman Gayre and Messrs. Ashwell and Francklyn 
are entreated to go, and to insist upon the general release already 
given by Wild, which the Company is advised by its counsel 
is an absolute discharge of all and every pretence, and to decline 
any re-examination of this complaint. Mr. Methwold proposes that 
Albert van Mantelowe^ a German gentleman who came home from 
India with him in the Mary, be allowed his diet and passage free, 
he being a man of quality and one of whom the King has taken 
special notice and had private conference with ; after some debate 
this is agreed to. Mr. Fotherby's bill of 97/. is. 3^. for the week's 
wages at Black wall to be paid. (i-|//.) 

A Court of Committees, February 19, 1640 i^Cow-t Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 138). 

The Court orders that those taking out the intended division 
in silk shall do so in the proportion of four-sevenths Legee, two- 
sevenths Ardas, and one-seventh Cannaree or Mazandran silk.*^ 
Mr. Methwold represents that at his entertainment he agreed to 
serve the Company for five and a half years at 500/. a year, 100/. to 

' See the previous volume, pp. 319, 320, &c. 

^ It need hardly be said that this was the well-known traveller, Albert von Mandelslo, 
The Court had previously decided to make him pay for his passaj^e (see the preceding 
volume, p. 358). 

' For 'Ardas' and 'Legee' see the previous volume, pp. 57, 170. Mazanderan is 
a province of Persia bordering on the Caspian. ' Cannaree ' is explained by some 
passages in Travels of Venetians in Persia (Hakluyt Society, 1873), where at p. 56 
mention is made of 'Chianer, whence come the Cana!ry silks', and at p. 1 1 2 of a fortress 
named ' Canar ', where silk is made which is called ' Canarian '. This place seems to 
have been in or near the valley of the Aras ; possibly it is the modern Kainar, 25 miles 
norlh-west of Khoi. 



i8 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

be paid in India and the remaining 400/, to be added to his 
adventure of j,ooo/. underwritten before his departure, as appears 
in an order of the 27th of February, 1633; having served six and 
three quarter years, he now desires that his adventure may be 
settled. The Court, remembering his faithful service, orders his 
adventure to be settled at 2,700/., and any odd money due for wages 
to be paid to him. Yeldowes, an Armenian, servant to Cojah 
Sufifraes, chief of the Armenians in Persia, petitions for a passage 
for himself, Carrabett ^, another Armenian, and their two servants, 
in the ship bound for Surat, offering to pay what freight is con- 
sidered right ; whereupon Thomas Steevens is desired to view their 
goods. The pepper to be sold next Friday is to be put up in 
parcels, fifty bags to each parcel, to be sifted and sold for transport 
at 3^. 4d. per lb. at three six months ^ from next Lady Day ; and 
for the pepper sold in town the time is to be six and six months 
from the same date, (i^ pp.) 

A Court of Committees, February 21, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 139). 

A request is made on behalf of Lady Hamerslyand her daughter, 
Mrs. Andrew Coggan, that the freight of calicoes sent in the Mary 
as tokens by Mr. Coggan may be remitted ; the Court, out of 
respect for Lady Hamersly, orders that the freight of thirty pieces 
be remitted, but the remainder (calicoes being the Company's 
commodity) detained and the price they cost in India paid for them. 
Certain Committees are desired to decide concerning other calicoes 
brought home in the Mary as private trade. Alderman Abdy 
reports that he and the Lord Mayor have met Sir Paul Pinder 
and Mr, Laurence Halstead several times for settlement of the 
dispute between James Cox and the Company, and in their opinion 
Mr. Cox should be allowed after the rate of 100/. per annum for 
the wages of Giles Hobbs ; consideration hereof is deferred. Alder- 
man Gayre reports the proceedings at a meeting of the referees 
appointed to consider the petition of Richard Wild, and how those 
on behalf of the Company caused some former orders, reducing 

' These names are Yulduz, Kwaja Sarfaraz, and Karapet. 

^ The meaning is that payment was to be made in three instalments, at intervals of six 
months. This corrects a note on p. 1 1 of the previous volume. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 19 

Mr. Wild's fine from 2,500/. to 2,000 marks and then to 1,000 
marks, to be read, and also insisted on the general release he gave 
the Company ; and how Mr. Wild persisted in his demands made 
before he gave the said release. The matter is referred until the 
Court's order fining Wild 2,500/., and the letter of the latter to 
Mr. Clement when he sent Mr. Skibbow up to Agra, both of which 
are missing, can be found and Mr. Sherborne consulted about them. 
Messrs. Reynardson and Ashwell to examine and report on the 
account and difference between the Company and Sir Dudley Diggs. 
Mr. Cappur to prepare all accusations and complaints from the 
consultations and general and private letters brought against Guy 
Bath, William and Henry Johnson, Robert Manly, and all other 
delinquents. (2//.) 

A General Court of Sales, February 21, 1640 [Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 141). 

Sale of pepper, ginger, cotton yarn, aloes, indigo, and sugar, 
with prices and names of purchasers, {^^pp) 

A Court of Committees, February 26, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 143). 

Four minions to be bought and put aboard the Szvan for her 
better defence. Consideration had of the demands of Mr. Cox, 
administrator of Giles Hobbs, for services rendered by the latter to 
the Company in carrying letters overland to Persia. One of the 
Committees to whom this business was referred declares his opinion 
that 50/. per annum is sufficient remuneration ; this the Company 
is willing to pay, otherwise to refer the matter to the course of 
justice. Richard Nelmes, Richard Pigott, William Ruddyard, 
Richard Allen, Thomas Culling and [ ] Alston accepted by the 
balloting-box as securities for pepper. Charles Slade, son and 
administrator of Captain James Slade, to receive his father's estate 
now in the Company's hands, deduction being first made of 264/. 
due by bill unto Mr. Fremlyn, which is to be paid to Mr. Methwold, 
he having a letter of attorney to receive the same. Charles Slade 
is to sign a bond for 100/. to save the Company harmless from all 
claims made on the said estate within the next two years. A letter 
of thanks to be written to Sir John Pennington, Vice- Admiral of the 

C 2 



20 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Narrow Seas, and 50/. to be given to him, for supplying the Mary with 
men and provisions at her arrival in the Downs ; also 10/, to be given 
to the master, and 10/. to the boatswain, coxswain, and men, to be 
distributed as Sir John pleases. George Hadley, James Smith, 
Henry Baynebrigg, and Ralph Stredwick accepted by the balloting- 
box as securities for Malabar pepper and indigo. Francis Hurst, 
recommended by Justice Crooke, is entertained as steward's mate 
in the Jonas in place of John Hodgeson. Two fine scarlets, one 
fine grass-green cloth, and one ' popingaye cullor ' to be bought 
and sent for presents to Persia and Surat. (i|//.) 

A Court of Committees, February 28, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 145). 

Samuel Harsenett, Thomas Browne, Stephen Burton, and 
Edward Prescott accepted as securities for pepper and ginger ; and 
Sir Nicholas Crispe, Samuel Crispe, and Samuel Carleton as 
securities for indigo. Alderman Gayre is desired to join Messrs. 
Reynardson and Ashwell in deciding the dispute between the 
Company and Mr. Diggs concerning his father's account. The 
Committees appointed for private trade report their opinions that, 
as calicoes are the Company's commodity, all those belonging to 
private men should be reserved for the Company, who should pay 
for them as its own ; whereupon the Court directs that those having 
calicoes shall bring a note of their prime cost to Mr. Bowen, when 
further orders concerning them shall be given. The wages of 
John Browne, Walter Starre, and [ ] Bowen, master's mates in 

the Mary, to be paid. Alderman Abdy reports that some of the 
referees in Mr. Cox's business think that 100/. per annum should 
be allowed for the wages of Giles Hobbs, but he considers that 50/. 
is sufficient ; this latter opinion the Court confirms and resolves 
to give no more. Mr. Cox then demands his division in silk ; this 
is refused, as upon the 1,600/. subscribed by him he has paid in 
nothing, yet he has been given credit for 1,000/. by his divi- 
sions in the Voyages and by the wages of Hobbs towards the 
supply of his subscription ; but order is given to allow him interest 
on the said wages from the time of the news of the death of Hobbs. 
Captain Milward moves that, notwithstanding his debt of 1,500/,, 
he may receive his division in silk, amounting to about 3,000/, ; 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 21 

Mr. Sambrooke is directed to make up the Captain's account, charge 
it with interest till next Midsummer two years, and present it at the 
next court. Lancelot Falkener's petition to receive his father's adven- 
ture for himself and his brothers, according to the directions in his 
father's will, is refused, the adventure having already been paid 
in part, and the rest sold twenty years since. Widow Thompkins 
petitions for the wages of John Clarke, deceased, in payment of 
a debt due to her late husband ; ordered that she be paid the said 
debt and her charges, but that Clarke's estate be reserved for his 
father, who is still living. John Mantle entertained at 12^. per 
month to attend on Mr. Steevens. Rebecca Eldred and her son 
Nathaniel, executors to John Eldred, transfer to George Clarke 
1,012/. IOJ-. adventure in the Third Joint Stock, upon which is 
divided 12/. 10s. per hundred. Yeldowes and three other Armenians 
agree to pay 400 rials of eight for their passage and the freight 
of eight chests of goods, to lay in their own provisions, and to give 
bond for payment at Surat before delivery of their goods. {2^ pp.) 

A Court of Committees, March 3, 1640 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 147)- 

The Court, on hearing the contents of a letter received by Simon 
Laurence from Mr. Merry, is so well pleased with the proceedings 
of the latter since his arrival in Persia that for his better encourage- 
ment his wages are ordered to be increased from 150/. to 300/. per 
annum, to begin from the 25th instant. {^ p.) 

A Court of Committees, March 4, 1640 {Court Booh, vol. 
xvii, p. 147). 

The Earl of Northumberland's request by letter for loan of the 
Company's slaughter and store houses at Blackwall for the King's 
service is granted (all the oxen required for the Company's use 
this spring having been killed), provided that Mr. Cooper and the 
other undertakers clear the houses at their own charge, and make 
good what damage shall be done. Daniel Bancks transfers to 
John Langham 210/. adventure and profit in the Third Joint Stock, 
on which is divided 26/. ^s. An Officer of the Admiralty pre- 
senting an attachment for all wages, &c., belonging to the late 
William Slade, he is told that the Court knows of no such estate. 



33 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

On the motion of Mr. Beauchampe, Sir Francis Crane's account 
for tapestry sent into the Indies is ordered to be made up. Messrs. 
Trott and Davies are entreated to oversee the weighing and 
delivery of the divisions in silk. Mr. Davidson, the ropemaker, 
having been directed to make a cable for the King in place of one 
borrowed by the Company, now presents a receipt for one made 
for the King's ship, the Unicorn. The Court orders 30,000 rials of 
eight to be provided to supply the proportion of 50,000/. in goods 
and money formerly ordered to be sent to Surat and Bantam. 
Richard Cooper, one of the undertakers for the King's service, is 
required to make satisfaction for sums charged upon him since his 
employment in Persia ; he denies that one of these is due, and 
being uncertain concerning the rest is directed to consult the 
Persian accounts of the Company and then to give answer. A 
warrant to be procured from the Earl of Northumberland's 
secretary to prevent men in the Company's ships being pressed to 
serve the King. {'i\ pp-) 

A Court of Committees, March 5, 1640 {Coiirt Book, vol. 
xvli,p. 149). 

Captain Jourdayne, commander of the Caesar, on his return 
from Bantam is to pay 10/. for repairing the dock where his ship 
was trimmed, and 8/. 8^. o^d. for necessaries and materials used. 
Mr. Mosse to be given 20s. for drawing and engrossing the charter- 
party of the Caesar. George Farmer to receive his wages for the 
time he served in the Coaster and the Blessing, he giving security 
for repayment if necessary. {\p.) 

A Court of Committees, March 10, 1640 [Cojirt Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 150). 

Cojah Pedrosse [Khwaja Petros], an Armenian, is granted a 
passage in the Crispian with his two chests of goods, he agreeing 
to pay 100 rials of eight to the President at Surat before delivery of 
the same. Mr. Smithwick produces a warrant from the Lords of 
the Council, dated the 3rd instant, for return of his 900/. adventure 
in the present Stock which with all profits he gave for repair of 
St. Paul's ^, but which he desires returned on account of the great 

^ See the introduction to the previous volume, p. xxxvi. The order will be found in 
the Privy Council Registers. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 23 

losses he has sustained lately ; order is given accordingly. 
Smithwick next proposes that he shall pay no more brokes than 
he receives interest, but for this he is referred to the General 
Court. He offers to show how the Company has been cozened of 
500/. if he is allowed to see the books of accounts, but is told that 
if he will deliver a note of the supposed defrauders and the year 
when they did this, two Committees shall examine the accounts 
with him, but it is not held fit for him to ' ravell ' in the books on 
this pretence. Albert Van Mantelowe sends by Mr. Methwold 5/. 
to be given to the poor, in acknowledgement of the Company's 
favour in giving him his passage and freight free. The masters of 
the ships ordered to use all diligence in dispatch of their vessels, 
and not to stay for the cloth formerly ordered if it is not ready in 
time. Edward Ironside transfers to John Massingberd his adven- 
ture of 750/. in the Third Joint Stock with all profits, on which 
is divided 281/. ^s., and 61. ^s. ^d. arrear upon late payments to be 
made good in account. The Court orders that Signor Don 
Anthonio Fernandez shall pay for freight of his musk brought 
home in the Alary at the rate of two per cent. Mr. Treasurer to 
pay for twelve loads of knee timber bought by Steevens, the 
shipwright. On her petition and the Lord Mayor's recommendation, 
5/. from the poor-box is given to Hannah Pendred, only daughter 
of 'that reverend gent', the late William Perkyns of Cambridge \ 
to supply her wants. Anne, wife of Thomas Leyning, a factor in 
India, to be paid one-third of her husband's wages. John Dunne's 
request that two months of his wages be paid to his father is 
granted. (3 pp.) 

A General Court held at Merchant Taylors' Hall, 
March 12, 1640 [Court Book, vol. xvii, p. 152). 

Lord Cottington informs the Court that, in accordance with the 
King's pleasure and direction, he has come to declare to the 
Company His Majesty's gracious favour and good intentions to 
encourage the adventurers in upholding this great and important 

^ This is the celebrated divine of Elizabeth's reign. In Cooper's Atheme Cantahri^. 
(vol. ii, p. 336) it is stated that Perkins's daughter IL^nnall married ' John Brooke!-, 
parson of Chesterfield ' ; and the name given above must have been the result of a second 
marriage of which nothing is known. 



24 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

trade to the Indies. That the generality may understand the care 
of the Governor and Committees, His Lordship relates how by 
petition and remonstrance they made known the great and 
apparent danger the trade was in by the many discouragements 
lately received at home and the wrongs and injuries done to it 
abroad, as well by the Dutch as by the depredations committed by 
Cobb and Ayres in the Red Sea, which with other complaints and 
grievances so disheartened the adventurers that unless the King 
would take the Company under his gracious protection, whereby 
satisfaction might be received from the Dutch for past injuries and 
a reglement made for the future, with the removal of other dis- 
turbances now in agitation, the trade could not be continued, but 
must of necessity fall into the hands of the Dutch. The King, 
taking all this into consideration, and observing the great 
importance of the trade in respect of the profit and advantage to 
himself in the increase of customs, the dishonour it will be to 
himself and the nation if it is deserted by the Company and taken 
up by neighbouring nations, and the many inconveniences this 
would entail, has graciously heard the said grievances and their 
remedies largely debated, and has approved of an order in which 
he declares himself so far touching the particular complaints 
contained in the petition and remonstrance as will doubtless give 
satisfaction. This order Lord Cottington desires the Governor to 
read, assuring them that the King will make good all that is 
contained therein. His Lordship produces a paper containing the 
four grievances expressed in the Company's remonstrance, with 
the King's answer to each: viz. — i. The complaint against the 
Dutch, from whom for their violent and undue proceedings satis- 
faction is demanded : His Majesty's answer is that this business 
has long been and still is in treaty. Sir William Boswell and others 
being employed about it, and that it is now in a fair way of 
accommodation, and will not be long before it is brought to an 
end. 2. For the damages received by the late depredations 
committed by Cobb and Ayres and their associates in the Red 
Sea, His Majesty is ready to afford the Company what satisfaction 
lies in his power, which is to allow the offenders to be proceeded 
against according to the laws of his kingdom. 3. Concerning the 
exportation of East Indian commodities, the Company is to be 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 25 

allowed the same time and liberty it had before the late 
restraint, and the King has given direction accordingly to the Lord 
Treasurer. 4. Concerning the licences and patents which the 
King has granted for plantations at Mauritius, Madagascar, and 
other parts beyond the Cape (which His Majesty was assured 
were for the good of the Company), seeing these are much 
complained of and tend to discourage the adventurers, the King 
has resolved not only to stop the ships intended for those parts 
and to call in their licences and patents and grant no more, but 
to leave the sole trade to the Company, provided it will raise 
such a stock as shall enable it to maintain that charge and over- 
come the difficulties attendant on such undertakings. Further, 
Lord Cottington declares that it is the King's express pleasure 
and resolution to give Mr. William Courteene liberty to send out 
this ship only, as it is for relief, not for continuance of trade ; 
which the Company is entreated to believe ; also that, as His 
Majesty has commanded the Earl of Southampton's ships to be 
stayed and not to be released upon any condition, if the said 
Earl shall make any offer, not disadvantageous to the Company, 
he shall be listened to and favoured as far as possible, though 
nothing is to be enforced. For encouragement of those who 
intend to join in the new subscription. His Lordship declares that 
the King intends to renew the Company's charter, with such 
further privileges and immunities as shall be fitting and conduce 
to its advantage and welfare ; therefore he suggests that the 
Company should meet to consider the privileges requisite to be 
inserted in the new charter in addition to those formerly granted, 
and put the same in writing for consideration. The King has also 
commanded Lord Cottington to commend to the Company the 
avoidance of all unnecessary expenses in the new stock, and that 
it should be husbanded to the best advantage for encouragement 
of the adventurers. Lastly, His Lordship concludes with a request 
from the King to the effect that as the fortune and support of this 
trade is of so much consequence to His Majesty and the country, 
and cannot as things now stand admit of further delay, that 
the best means be used for the subscription of such a stock 
as may accomplish what is intended, and His Majesty informed 
from time to time what 'rubs' there are, that if all intended by 



26 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

the new subscription cannot be effected he and the State may- 
consider anew what other course to pursue, His Majesty being 
resolved that the trade shall not be lost, but supported and 
maintained one way or another. The order of the King and 
Lords already referred to is read and also the preamble, which 
according to the said order was first brought to the King and 
confirmed by him as it is entered before being divulged. This 
meeting having been deferred longer than was intended because of 
Lord Cottington's indisposition, the time for subscription is now 
thought to be too short, and His Lordship advising that it be 
enlarged, this is left to the consideration of the Governor and 
Committees. Hereupon the Governor, in order to invite and 
encourage the old as well as the new adventurers to subscribe 
more largely and to bring in the moneys according to the 
conditions of the preamble, informs the Court, as he has already 
informed Lord Cottington, that there is one present who is able 
to give such an account of India and the Company's affairs 
there as has encouraged himself and many others to think much 
better of this trade, and will give great satisfaction to the 
generality. This person was an eye-witness of the great mortality 
in India and a sufferer on account of the depredations committed 
by Cobb and Ayres in the Red Sea ; but all these discouragements 
are now past, and the King has granted the Company his favour 
and protection, and promises to deny nothing that may encourage 
this trade ; the condition of affairs, both in India and Persia, on 
account of the peace made with the Portuguese, was never more 
hopeful, the King of Persia having not only made a contract but 
already delivered to the agent 340 bales of silk (which are now at 
Surat) towards satisfaction of the long outstanding debt looked 
upon as desperate. All this the Governor desires the Court to 
consider and, nothing being wanting but men's 'good affections' 
and assistance, not to suffer the trade to lapse to the Dutch. For 
their further assurance he desires Mr. Methwold to speak. The 
latter, after excusing himself, he not having come prepared to 
address the Court, says that he has been employed twenty-five 
years by the Company, the last seven as President at Surat, where 
on arriving he found everything in a miserable condition and 
strangely altered from when he was first in India, the people dead. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 27 

towns depopulated, and all things incredibly dear ; but now all is 
different, for since the famine and pestilence ceased the people 
have come down from remote parts of the country and settled 
again in the towns, spinners, weavers, merchants, and artificers ; 
so that manufactures are as plentiful and as cheap as formerly. 
The peace concluded with the Portuguese is of great consequence 
and advantage to the Company, for now the Portuguese ports are 
open and free, and the charge of shipping is consequently greatly 
reduced. Then also there is the enlargement of trade with Synda, 
which place yields indigo, calicoes, and many other commodities, 
and is of additional value because the Portuguese will not allow 
the Dutch to trade there. In these respects and many others 
Mr. Methwold alleges that the trade of India, &c., was never in 
a more hopeful condition than now. (5^ /)/.) 

A Court of Committees, March 17, 1640 {Ccnrt Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 157). 

William Baily, late commander of the Mary, accepted as security 
for John Jefferies, purser in the Jonas. Captain Crane's request 
for an account of the tapestry sent by his late brother, Sir Francis 
Crane, and sold in the Indies, and to have such as was not sold 
delivered to him, is referred until the said tapestry and account have 
been examined and reported on. Mr, Digges desires that the 
account of his late father. Sir Dudley Digges, may be cleared and 
discharged of the 300/. interest by reason of the money borrowed of 
the Company when he went as Ambassador into Muscovy ; but the 
Committees appointed to examine this business reporting that they 
had found no order of the Court to discharge the said 300/., and so 
had left the account as it stood, Mr. Digges departs very dissatisfied. 
The Court understanding that James Cox, a prisoner in the Fleet, 
is very sick and in great want of money to defray his necessary 
expenses, Mr. Cappur is directed to take him 30/. on account of 
what shall hereafter be due to him. The charges incurred by 
John Willoughby in following the court to obtain payment for the 
tapestry hangings sold for Sir Francis Crane are to be put to 
Sir Francis's account. A letter from Persia charging Richard 
Cooper with a debt of 150 tomands is again read, when it is 
resolved to sue Cooper if he docs not clear himself. Gregory 



28 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Clement accepted as security for George Byle, purser in the Sivan. 
Mr. Sherborne reports the answers he has received from the Lord 
Chamberlain, the Marquess of Hamilton, and Lord Goring concerning 
their subscriptions to the intended New Joint Stock. (li/A) 

A Court of Committees, March 23, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 159). 

The Court orders that the Jonas and the Sivan proceed at once 
to the Downs with what money is ready, and start with the 
Crispian because of the danger of pirates. Jane Drake, mother 
and administratrix of John Drake, deceased in India, to be paid 
220/. The Mary to be brought into dock at Blackwall. Thomas 
Come and Samuel Sambrooke to endeavour to seize Captain Cobb 
at Birchington by virtue of a warrant from the Admiralty. John 
Lethelieur transfers to Sir James Cambell 1,700/. adventure in the 
Third Joint Stock with all profits, whereon is divided 850/., for- 
merly transferred from Mrs. Margaret Kirbye's account. William 
Baily's account to be cleared. (| /.) 

A Court of Committees, March 24, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 160). 

This Court being purposely called to consult concerning the 
dispatch of the Crispian, after some dispute it is agreed that the 
said ship shall stay in the Downs for the Jonas and Szvaji until 
Monday next, and Samuel Sambrooke is desired to repair thither 
with these orders. (^ /.) 

A Court of Committees, March 26, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 160). 

Ordered that the Crispian shall not wait in the Downs, but shall 
proceed on her voyage at the first fair wind. The wages of John 
Spiller in India to be increased 10/. yearly from last Lady Day, 
until they amount to 100/., and then to stop. (| p) 

A Court of Committees, March 30, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 161). 

A new policy is ordered to be made for assurance of 100,000/., 
after the manner and time of the former policy, and to be under- 
written in the same way. Mr. Smithwick tenders three written 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 29 

propositions for composition with his creditors, and desires the 
Governor to accept one ; he is referred to the General Court. The 
request of Sir John Nulls to transfer the bargain of flat indigo he 
lately bought of the Company to Sir Job Harby and Sir Nicholas 
Crispe is granted. A General Court of Sales appointed to be held 
Wednesday next come sennight, and a General Court on the Friday 
following. (I /.) 

A Court of Committees, April i, J640 {Court Book,vo\.y:si\\, 
p. 162). 

Mr. Smithwick asks for a certificate to the Farmers of the 
Customs, testifying that he and his son are free brethren ; this the 
Court consents to give, but refuses his request to certify that 
the silk he intends to transport is part of that which came home 
in the Mary and the Szvan. Seven thousand pipestaves offered for 
sale by Mr. Marston to be bought, if fit, as reasonably as possible. 
Nineteen hogsheads of wet pepper swept from the hold of the 
Mary, and what more is expected to be found there, to be sent to 
Mr. Blunt to be dried and sifted ready for use. Mr. Fotherby to 
distribute amongst the poor at Blackwall eight hogsheads of beef 
returned in the Mary. A note sent to the Court from James Cox 
by his cousin Mrs. Cox and Mr. Bambridge, desiring to be paid 
30c/. or 400/., for his urgent occasions, out of the 1,650/. which he 
pretends is due to him from the Company, the rest to be retained 
until all differences shall be settled ; reply is returned that it is his 
own fault the said differences are not composed, and that till this is 
done by him the Court is determined not to pay any more than the 
30/. lately sent to him. James Martyn buys 1,050 pieces of 
' cashees ' ^, agreeing to pay for them at three six months. Mr. Sher- 
borne's account of moneys disbursed for the Company having been 
audited, 26/. igj-. 6d. spent over and above what he has received is 
ordered to be paid to him. Richard Swinglehurst is directed to 
pay 5/. for two and a half years' rent owing for that part of the 
Exchange cellar leased by Mr. Carleton to the Company at 40J. 
per annum. (i| //.) 

' A kind of fine calico or muslin. 



30 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, April 4, 1640 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 163). 

The policy of assurance being agreed upon, the Court orders 
that none shall underwrite for more than 3,000/., and that the names 
of all underwriters must be presented beforehand. Mr. Craddock 
gives in an account of cloth bought for the Company, with the 
charges for dyeing and dressing, amounting to 3,317/. 15^"., of which 
617/. 15^. being due to him, it is ordered to be paid. Thomas 
Wilmer to receive 3/. 4^-. ^d. of the wages of Bernard Bragg, who 
went out and returned in the Alary, and is to go in the Jonas to 
the Indies ; the nephew of the latter, Matthew Bragg, having 
a letter of attorney, is to be paid the remainder on promising to 
save Wilmer harmless for being bound for imprest of Bernard 
Bragg, ilp.) 

A Court of Committees, April 15, 1640 (Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 164). 

Captain Milward renewing his motion for remission of brokes 
and interest charged upon his adventure in this Third Joint Stock, 
he is referred to the General Court. Relation is made of the manner 
in which Sir John Pennington accepts the Company's intended 
gratification for his assistance to the Mary, with which he has been 
acquainted by letter ; Captain Roberts and Mr. Methwold are 
entreated to wait on Sir John, to present him with ' 100 angells', 
and to tell him that had the Company been in its former estate 
and condition its thankfulness would have been expressed in 
a larger and more ample manner. Mr. Smithwick complains that 
he was debarred from underwriting in the last policy and desires 
permission to do so in the new for 3,000/., offering as his security 
Sir Edward Wardour ; he is told that Sir Edward, having already 
underwritten for 2,500/., six times more than his adventure, cannot 
be accepted as security ; the latter being an able and worthy 
gentleman, the Court does not doubt that, on being spoken to, he 
will be satisfied in this matter. It is put to the question whether 
those adventurers having ' protections ' ^ shall be admitted to under- 

* ' An immunity granted by the Crown to a certain person to be free from suits at law 
for a certain time and for some reasonable cause ' ^Wharton's Lazv Lexicon). 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 31 

VvTite in this policy, and whether those who do so underwrite shall 
be restricted to a certain sum ; by erection of hands it is ordered 
that no man having a ' protection ' shall underwrite, that none shall 
underwrite but with the permission of the Court, and then for not 
more than his subscription or according to the proportion of his 
stock, and that none shall exceed 3,000/. Letters read from 
Mr. Steevens, master of the Crispian, and question raised as to 
whether, in the event of the said ship not being able to reach Surat 
with the easterly monsoon, she had better go first for Bantam, or 
for Masulipatam and then to Bantam ; this is referred for future 
determination. Mr. Dyke desiring that his subscription of 300/., 
for which he underwrote in the last Joint Stock, may be cancelled 
and the brokes and interest thereon due remitted, he is referred to 
the decision of the General Court. Thomas Rich moves for abate- 
ment of price or allowance of time for pepper bought of the 
Company, and is granted an ob.^ per lb. abatement, some of the 
said pepper not being garbled. (2 pp^ 

A General Court of Sales, April 15, 1640 (Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 166). 

Sale of pepper, rice, indigo, calicoes, percallaes, and sallampores, 
with prices and names of purchasers. {\\ pp.) 

A General Court, April 17, 1640 {Court Booh, vol. xvii, 
p. 168). 

The Governor acquaints the generality that, by the last General 
Court which they have now heard read, they may observe not only 
how diligently and carefully he, the Deputy, and the Committees 
have demonstrated to the King and Lords the present condition 
of the Company, and humbly asked for relief of its grievances, but 
also the answer of His Majesty and the Lords, as expressed in the 
gracious order of the 10th of December last and by the relation 
of Lord Cottington, who came by the special direction of the King 
to confirm all the particulars contained in the said order and what- 
soever else may conduce to the benefit of the Company. The 
Governor had hoped that all would have willingly furthered the 
business now in agitation by free and ample subscriptions ; whereas 

^ Obolus, i.e. a halfpenny. 



32 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

he finds most of them backward and unwilling to help with this 
great work, as appears by the small subscriptions. This is to be 
'admired' [i.e. wondered at], considering the King's gracious 
promises and favours, which he, the Governor, is confident will 
be performed when such a stock is underwritten for as shall pro- 
claim the resolution of the Company to proceed with this trade. 
He desires them seriously to consider and not to be discouraged, 
especially as hopes of success have never been greater or fairer than 
now. It is forty years since this trade was begun by Sir John 
Spencer, Sir James Lancaster, Sir William Rumny, Alderman 
Holliday, and others, and it has ever since ' stood upon its owne 
leggs ', notwithstanding many discouragements and losses sustained, 
the injuries and wrongs done by the Dutch, and the expenses 
incurred by reason of the strength of the Portugals ; yet, nothing 
daunted, the Company has gone on with alacrity and cheerfulness. 
If this could be done when the trade was in its infancy, how much 
better now when it is certain and prosperous. Not only are the 
quarrels between the Company and the Dutch quieted, but peace 
is concluded with the Portugals, with whom there is free commerce ; 
likewise the trade with ' Sinda ' and other places before undis- 
covered is now open. Therefore it is the more to be wondered 
at that the generality are so discontented and indulge in causeless 
fears. Hereupon objection is raised to the preamble, which directs 
alteration in the government and a change of Governor every year ; 
this causes discouragement, and is thought likely to be prejudicial 
to the Company. Others speak of the wrongs and injuries com- 
mitted by the Dutch, especially at Amboyna, for which, in spite 
of promises made by the King and State, no satisfaction has been 
given. For these reasons men will not be persuaded to underwrite 
for a new stock. It is proposed that the preamble be printed and 
distributed in the principal towns, so that the subscription may 
be enlarged ; also that a petition be presented to the House 
of Commons, complaining of the sufferings caused by the Dutch 
and of the depredations of Cobb and Ayres in the Red Sea, and 
imploring aid and direction for reparation and satisfaction. It is 
replied that the King has taken the business of Amboyna into his 
own hands, and that this, with the settling of a reglement for trade, 
is in a fair way of accommodation : that the petitioning of the 



EAST INDIA COMPANY s$ 

House of Commons was debated by the Court of Committees this 
morning \ when it was resolved that the Recorder's counsel should 
be taken and acted upon. As regards Cobb and Ayres, the 
Company must proceed against them by law. Mr. Governor 
expresses his hearty sorrow that, notwithstanding the reasons 
he and some of the Committees have stated, and Mr. Methwold's 
declaration at the last general court, together with the advices 
received from the factors, the generality will not rely on the King's 
gracious promises and underwrite for a subscription sufficient to 
prosecute and maintain the trade. He must report their resolution 
to His Majesty, who will take counsel again what further course 
to pursue, as he is resolved not to suffer the trade to be lost. The 
petitions of Captain Milward and John Dyke are read ; and a motion 
made by Mr. Thoroughgood, a counsellor, on behalf of James Cox. 
Captain Milward's petition shows that he is indebted to the Com- 
pany 4,210/., besides 794/- gs. for brokes and 1,168/. 2s. ^d. for 
interest, and prays that the said brokes and interest may be re- 
mitted, he having failed and most of his creditors having agreed 
to accept \os. in the pound ; the Court desiring to show him favour 
(he having been an adventurer since the Third Voyage, and a Com- 
mittee for many years) agrees to remit his brokes, but for the rest 
refers him with Mr. Dyke and Mr. Cox to the next General Court. 
An order is read from the Court of Honour, under the hand of Lord 
Maltravars, enjoining Thomas Smithwick, Senior, to make his 
submission and acknow ledgement of wrongs done to the Governor, 
Sir Henry Garway, Lord Mayor, to Aldermen Abdy and Highlord, 
and to Mr. Sherburne, upon which the said Smithwick ' with some 
reluctancy and repyning ' reads his said submission and acknowledge- 
ment. (3I//.) 

A Court of Committees, April 22, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 172}. 

Thomas Smithwick, Senior, transfers to John Langham, mer- 
chant, 200/. adventure in the Third Joint Stock, fifty per cent, 
being divided. Anthony Staughton transfers to William Vincent 

^ This court is not entered ; probably its proceedings were purposely left unreported 
in order to preserve secrecy. The Recorder was Thomas Gardiner, afterwards Solicitor- 
General. 

S.C.M. It D 



34 COURT MINUTES, ETC, OF THE 

187/. ics. adventure in the Third Joint Stock, 46/. 17^. 6d. 
being divided, and charged with an arrear of i/. igs. 8d. A 
letter to be written to Mr. Robinson, the searcher at Gravesend, 
directing him to forward to the Custom-house in London the 
broadcloths which he lately stopped from being sent to India 
as private trade. Mr. Methwold is granted remission of freight 
on his goods brought home as private trade in the Mary, 
in acknowledgement of the good service done by him to the Com- 
pany, more especially in securing the truce with the Portuguese. 
Papers to be delivered to Thomas Chauncy, to enable him to decide 
a lawsuit and to give a just account of his debt to the Company. 
Sir John Nulls, Sir Job Harby, Sir Nicholas Crispe, Abraham 
Chamberleyne, Senior, Abraham Chamberleyne, Junior, George 
Henly, Herryott Washborne, Henry and William Baynebrigge, 
John Brett and Nicholas Boulton accepted by the balloting-box 
as securities for indigo. Richard Brainthwaite and Augustine 
Skinner, executors to Sir Thomas Style, deceased, appear to ratify 
and confirm the transfer made to George Francklyn, merchant, 
of 3,125/. adventure and profits in the Third Joint Stock, upon 
which is divided in cloves 25 per cent., and reserved to be taken 
out in silk 25 per cent., each of which amounts to 781/. ^s. The 
father and administrator of the late Joseph Keeling demands the 
remainder of his son's estate in the Company's hands, amounting 
to 189/. \^s. <^d. ; the Court orders this to be paid, upon Mr. Keeling 
entering into bond to make good anything that shall hereafter 
appear to be owing by his late son to the Company. Steevens 
reporting the great want of knee timber and that a parcel of thirty 
loads of very good Irish knee timber is offered to the Company by 
Andrew Burrell at 3/. 15^. or 4/. the load, he is ordered to treat for 
it, and also to survey the Mary and report whether she is fit to be 
repaired, and the probable cost. Mr. Cordwell to be paid 75/. for 
mending sixty barrels of defective powder at 3^. per lb. {'^\ pp.) 

A Court of Committees, April 24, 1640 {Co2irt Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 175). 

Mary, widow and executrix of William Fall, is allowed 10/. for 
her present relief; but, her late husband being one of the factors 
complained of in Persia, further settlement with her is deferred until 



EAST INDIA COMPANY ^5 

information is obtained from other factors returned from thence. 
The Court having received petitions from William and Henry 
Johnson, Guy Bath, Robert Manly, and others complained of in the 
general letters from Bantam and Persia, and the said petitioners 
desiring help, pretending they are wrongly accused, it is resolved 
that one day each week shall be set apart for examination of all 
complaints brought against them and their answers to the same. 
Mr. Governor relates the opinion and answer given by the Recorder 
when waited on by himself and certain Committees concerning the 
business of Cobb and Ayres, viz., whether to acquaint Parliament 
with their proceedings and desire relief, or to rely upon the ordinary 
course of law, as prescribed and allowed by the King. Mr. 
Recorder considers the Company is bound to do everything possible 
to right itself and punish the offenders, but at the same time wishes 
them to consider how the King will take the application to Parlia- 
ment, which will make his proceedings notorious, His Majesty 
having heard the Company several times concerning this matter 
and made an order for satisfaction therein ; also that it should 
be remembered that Parliament has no power to punish or fine the 
offenders, but only to recommend this to the Upper House, or to 
the judge before whom the case is now depending. The Governor 
desires the Court to debate and resolve on this business ; but, 
owing to the absence of some who attended the Recorder, resolu- 
tion herein is deferred. Letters having been written to Messrs. 
Robinson and Ward and the other searchers at Gravesend desiring 
them to send up the broadcloths stayed from being shipped in the 
Crispian as private trade, that the owners may be discovered and 
the Company reap the benefit of His Majesty's letters patent 
granted in that behalf, Robinson and Ward appear and expostulate, 
pretending that having seized the cloths they have an interest 
in them, and therefore will not deliver them up without a letter 
from the Lord Treasurer to save themselves harmless. The Court 
replies that the cloths were first discovered and stayed by its ser- 
vants, in accordance with the tenor of the Company's charter, the 
searchers having no power to seize them, the custom being paid and 
the cloths shipped at noonday from the Custom-house and an officer 
going with them to the ship. After some argument Robinson and 
Ward agree to deliver up the cloths on receipt of a warrant from 

D % 



36 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

the Lord Treasurer ; whereupon Mr. Sherburne is requested to 
apply to His Lordship for a warrant for the Company to receive 
the cloths, warrants having been granted in similar cases, notably 
in the dispute between the Company and Warner and Jesson.^ 
Alderman Gayre proposes that some 'course be thought of for 
disposal of the calicoes, as if they are not sold before the return 
of the ship expected some time next month it may prove very 
prejudicial ; he suggests that either they be offered by lots, or each 
sort sold separately by the candle, or divided among the ad- 
venturers ; and that, their value not exceeding 50,000/., a policy 
for that amount be underwritten for the Company's security. The 
Court not approving of these proposals, the disposal of the calicoes 
is deferred. A bill of 18/. for wages at Blackwall to be paid. Two 
guardians, James Woodward and — Croshaw, having brought up 
goods in a lighter from the Mary and upon delivery a bale of silk 
was found missing, the Court resolves to stop their wages until the 
said silk is restored, and if this is not speedily done to take pro- 
ceedings against them. Mr. Bowen reports that the Company 
is likely to receive great damage from the defective goods returned 
in the Mary , and suggests that some of the Committees should see 
and treat with the Farmers for allowance on them. Mr. Markham, 
who is to deliver to Captain Crane a copy of the account concern- 
ing the hangings, desires to know whether to cast it up at ^s. or 
6j-. 8^. the rupee ^ ; he is told to do so at the latter rate. The 
remainder of the mouldy pepper bought by George Clarke to be 
delivered to him, he having paid for all. Two mooring cables 
to be delivered to Captain Hall to raise the Pleiades^ he paying 
for them according to Fotherby and Swanly's valuation. {\pp-) 

A Court of Committees, April 29, 1640 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 179). 

Many returned factors being desirous their accounts should be 
cleared, they are told to attend on the ordinary court days. 
Mr. Manly, William and Henry Johnson, Guy Bath, and Mrs, Gove 
to attend next Wednesday. A question is raised concerning the 
entering of goods in the Custom-house, and the account of the custom 

^ See the Calendar of State Papers, E. Indies, 1630-34, pp. 113, &c. 

* This enhanced rate is meant to represent the value of a cash payment at Surat. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 



37 



of the Marys goods not being finished, Mr. Bovvcn is desired to 
wait on the Comptroller and desire that no stop be made on the 
entry of goods to be shipped out. Upon the petition of Richard 
Newbury, executor to Edith, late widow of Abel Druce, the Court 
orders Druce's account to be cleared, and promises that, if any 
goods appear hereafter belonging to him, account shall be given 
of them. Mr. Bowen is directed to make up the account of the 
tonnage of the goods brought home in the Mary. Fotherby and 
Steevens are ordered to make a computation of the cost of repairing 
the ships dispeeded last year, and the former to present a list next 
Wednesday of all stores and provisions in the yards at Blackwall 
and Deptford, at Sandwich, and in the Downs, that what is fit to 
be sold may be seen. John Dyamond is given lol. for services 
rendered at Surat in repairing ships and building boats. Mr. 
Fotherby 's request for increase of salary is denied, the Court think- 
ing his wages sufficient during the present state of the Company's 
affairs. At the request of Mr. Ashwell, leave is given to the owners 
of the Pleiades to put her ordnance in the Stone Wharf yard, 
Mr. Ashwell promising that if anything borrowed from the Company 
is broken or damaged it shall be made good. !Mr. Swanly's bill 
for petty charges from May, 1639, to March, 1640, is ordered to 
be paid. The Governor moving for consideration as to what to 
advise His Majesty concerning the book of subscriptions, the sum 
subscribed not being as large as was expected, after debate the 
general opinion is that the trade will go on, however unwilling men 
are to subscribe, but they will adventure more cheerfully if the 
merchants are left free to pursue their own resolutions. Mr. Sher- 
burne is directed to wait on Lord Cottington and ask his opinion 
whether it will be better ' to attend the King before the last day 
of subScripcion or sooner' \sic\ as the time first limited for under- 
writing has passed and the second is approaching. (3 //.) 

A Court of Committees, May 6, 1640 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 
p. iSi). 

Upon Mr. Sherburne's relation of the answer of the Lord 
Treasurer, who seems unwilling to grant the desired warrant to 
the searchers at Gravesend without hearing the allegations of both 
parties, the Court desires Mr. Sherburne to go again to His Lord- 



38 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

ship and request him not to grant a warrant for deh'very of the said 
goods to the proprietors until the Company knows their names and 
consents to the same. Mr. Sherburne also relates that he took the 
book of subscriptions to Lord Cottington and acquainted him with 
the amount subscribed and the small hope of any further enlarge- 
ment, the day appointed for subscriptions from those in or near 
London (the 25th April) having passed ; that he requested His 
Lordship's opinion whether the Company should give the King 
an account of the subscriptions now, or wait until the 35th instant^ 
the day appointed for the list to be closed, adding that if he would 
like to speak with the Governor or Committees they would wait on 
him. Lord Cottington replied that it would be well to forbear 
telling the King until after the last day of subscription, and that 
if the Governor with two or three Committees would wait on him 
he would be ready to advise with them on this matter. Those who 
underwrote in the first policy of 100,000/. pressing for payment 
of their money subscribed a year and a month ago, the Treasurer 
is directed to pay them their due. Mr. Bowen presents a note 
of defective goods brought home in the Alajy, on which custom 
ought to be abated as formerly ; whereupon Messrs. Ashwell, 
Wilson, and Francklyn are desired to treat with the Farmers, 
which they do and report that the Farmers are ready to give the 
Company satisfaction. The Governor, in order to vindicate himself 
from some unjust aspersions cast upon him for being unwilling 
to lessen the Company's charges, desires the Court to appoint a time 
to consider this business, and to take a survey of all stores and 
provisions at Deptford and Blackwall, that all things unnecessary 
may be sold. Hereupon Mr. Fotherby presents a list of stores, &c., 
at the said places and of those at Deal, with their valuation, which 
being read and considered, Saturday is set apart to view those 
at Blackwall and Deptford ; and it being observed that at Deal 
cables, anchors, stores, &c., are needed for supply of the outward 
and homeward-bound ships, the Court orders two cables to be sent 
there at once, and that provisions, &c., be supplied them from 
Blackwall. A court of sales to be held this day sennight, when, 
in order the better to sell the Company's calicoes and ascertain the 
value of the several sorts, one lot of all kinds is to be offered by 
the candle, with one lot of Coromandel cloth. On the application 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 39 

of Captain Ditchfeild, his son Thomas, who went out as attendant 
to Mr. Methwold and returned with him in the Mary, is granted 
remission of freight on sixty pieces of caHcoes brought home by 
him as private trade, his wages are ordered to be paid, and his account 
cleared. Abraham Chamberleyne and his son accepted as securities 
for indigo, part of Sir John NuUs's parcel, and Thomas Warren, 
merchant-taylor, and Arthur Juxon for garbled Malabar pepper. 
Thomas Warren, formerly servant to the late John Juxon, applies 
for the freedom of the Company in respect of service ; the Court, 
understanding that it is many years since he served his apprentice- 
ship, and that according to the Company's order he should have 
demanded his freedom within a year, or for every year since 
elapsed pay 5/., desires him to lay down so much money ; but 
on his pleading ignorance of this order he is admitted on payment 
of 5/. to the poor-box. The application of Captain Hall and 
Mr. Steevens, the Company's shipwright, on behalf of Mrs. Steevens. 
wife of Thomas Steevens, master of the Crisp ian, for remission 
of freight on calicoes brought home by her husband in the Mary, 
is refused, the Court remembering that Steevens had received 
favour for private trade when he was master in the Szvan, and also 
his frustrated attempt to carry these calicoes away secretly. Richard 
Miller, mercer, transfers to Daniel Andrews, merchant, 512/. ^s. 
adventure in the Third Joint Stock with all profits, upon which 
is divided in silk twenty-five per cent. Thomas Wilks, executor 
to the late Thomas Harris, transfers to Stephen Bourman 17c/. iCi-. 
adventure in the Third Joint Stock with all profits. {4 pp-) 

A Court of Committees, May 8, 1640 (Conr^ Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 185). 

A resolution of the last court to sell one lot of calicoes by the 
candle is confirmed, and bills are ordered to be set up for a Court 
of Sales to be held next Wednesday afternoon. Mr. Bowen re- 
porting that the account of goods in the Mary is at last cleared 
in the Custom-house, and that the Farmers have shown great 
consideration, also that ' Sir Abraham ' [Dawes] desires ten pieces 
of the defective calicoes for himself and Sir John Nulls, he is 
directed to present them with ' ten books of callico '. Vincent 
Cranfield, executor to his late father, Sir Randoll Cranfield, transfers 



40 COURT MINUTES, ETC, OF THE 

to John Massingberd 175/. adventure in the Third Joint Stock, 
with all profits. Guy Bath is questioned concerning 4,000 tomands 
lent to the Dutch in Persia ; he replies that he only knows of i,oco 
which he delivered to the Dutch Factory by order of Mr. Gibson, 
the Agent, the key of the door being fetched from Henry Chapman 
at noonday and every one in the factory knowing of the transaction ; 
of the rest he knows nothing. He requests that either the objec- 
tions against him may be given out and he allowed to return written 
answers, or that the Court will devise interrogations which he will 
answer upon oath ; the first proposal is adopted and Bath ordered 
to give in his written answers next Wednesday. At the request of 
William Swanly and Edward Steevens, their wages are ordered 
to be paid up to last Lady Day. Mr. Pryor, of the Assurance- 
house, to be given 25/. for making out the last policy. Mr. Woodall 
petitions for his wages, which have been taken from him since 
December, 1635, representing that he has cured above fifty people 
since then and written ' a booke of chirurgery for the good of the 
East India voyage '.^ He is given 6c/. in satisfaction of all demands 
from December, 1635, to next Midsummer. Upon the written 
request of Mr. Chauncy, Mr. Sambrooke is directed to deliver 
him a waste book, his account with Philip Mead, an assignment of 
226/. 135. 4^. from Alexander Rose, and his desk containing papers. 
Thomas [Abraham?] Aldington, late a factor at Surat, petitions 
for restoration of 820 rials taken from him by Mr. Methwold. 
The latter, being in court, alleges that Aldington, when employed 
with Mr. Wild to Goa, added to the petty charges account many 
items not allowed, and that in his voyage to China certain coho 
[coffee] dishes were committed to his care, many of which he can- 
not account for ; therefore the said money was taken from him 
and he referred to the Company at home. Abigail, wife of John 
Price, is given 40.y. from the poor-box. Ninety pieces of calicoes 
ordered to be delivered to the widow of Edward Moore, smith 
in the Jo7ias^ who died in the Marj>, on payment of 2s. 6d. per 
piece freight. Joan, wife of James Box, mercer, of Newnham, 
Gloucestershire, and mother of Thomas Box, who went out in 
the Crtspian, to receive two months' pay yearly of her son's wages, 
according to his letter of attorney. (2^//.) 

* His Surgions Mate, first published in 1617, but reissued with additions in 1639. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 41 

Warrant from the Commissioners for Saltpetre and 
Gunpowder to William Blytiie, May 13, 1640 {Public Record 
Office : Dom. CJias. I, vol. ccccliii, No. 2,^)- 

There is in the hands of the East India Company a certain 
quantity of East Indian saltpetre, which we require you to view 
and certify us both the quality and quantity thereof. (§/•) 

Notes upon the Memorial of the States Ambassador, 
May 19, 1640, ON the Proposal to throw open the Trade 
to the East Indies {Public Record Office : East Indies, vol. iv B, 
No. 75). 

Setting forth that by this means a way would be opened for the 
King of Spain to obtain from England a great number of ships and 
mariners and to entice merchants and others with fair promises 
of large hire and wages, which ships and men would be used by 
His Spanish Majesty and the Portuguese to transport goods and 
merchandise from place to place. This the friends and allies of the 
English, who by the King of Spain are treated as enemies when 
they are surprised and overtaken on that side of the line, would 
not approve of, as being contrary to the common practice that 
all who sail from one enemy's port to another are looked upon 
as enemies, and it might therefore be the cause of trouble. That 
the King of Spain, having done this, might put in the ships so 
obtained Spanish and Portuguese officers and employ them contrary 
to the will of the King of England and of their owners, this in- 
tention having been manifested in 1639, when His Spanish Majesty 
caused a great number of English ships to be hired and no one was 
able to hinder him in this or in other unjust acts.^ That the King's 
customs would also be very much diminished, the said ships being 
employed in the East Indies or in taking from thence goods to 
Portugal, when no return would be made to the King of England, 
which would not concern the merchants so long as they made their 
profit by the ships' freight. It would also frustrate all hopes 
of the English in the East Indies, or on that side of the Cape, 
ever undertaking to discover unknown places to trade to by them- 
selves and so to enhance the reputation of their King and nation. 
That if all merchants were allowed to trade freely in the East 
' See Gardiner's History, vol. ix, ch. 90. 



42 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Indies, the price of goods would be raised so much by competition 
that the returns would be very small. Other inconveniences might 
be urged against this proposition ; but the above are sufficient 
to show that, for the reputation and profit of His Majesty and 
the credit of the English nation, the East India trade should be 
confined to one particular company, (i p.) 

Memoranda concerning an open and free trade to the 
East Indies, 1640 {Public Record Office : East Indies, vol. iv B, 
No. 76). 

Showing that if the King permits such a trade the following 
ill effects will ensue, viz. : transportation of English ships and 
sailors into the Spanish service and power, whereby contentions 
and hostilities may arise between the English and other confederate 
nations. Damages and hazards to His Majesty's subjects by these 
men and ships being forced into services contrary to the royal will. 
Diminution of customs by East Indian goods being scattered to 
foreign parts and not brought into His Majesty's dominions. An 
aversion in the English to the discovery of unknown places which 
they might appropriate to His Majesty's and their own use ; with 
an uncertain and excessive valuation of all East Indian commodities. 
These and other reasons against an open trade seem especially 
to concern the King and his subjects, who by the many interruptions 
and injuries done them by the Dutch are kept down in their 
negotiations and forced to relinquish that trade, wherein one year's 
omission is about three years' loss in the great benefit which may 
be received from it. That it equally concerns the Dutch East 
India Company and the States General to prevent such an open 
trade, as they will inevitably be involved in the said ill effects ; and 
that it is their fault that the same are not prevented, for, if they by 
public authority would compose the differences concerning East 
Indian affairs and establish a new reglement between the two 
companies, it would stop the trade of particular persons and then 
there would be no fear of such evils. Praying the King to consider 
how important it is that the differences between the English and 
Dutch Companies should be settled and the trade into those parts 
speedily resolved into a new company ; and that he should not 
betray these intentions to the States Ambassador, but let the Dutch 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 43 

still suspect that because of the importunity of the Spanish Ambas- 
sador such an open trade will be granted, unless satisfaction is 
speedily rendered to the demands thought reasonable for a final 
settlement. (3 //.) 

A Court of Committees, May 22, 1640 {Court Book,\o\. xvii, 
p. 188). 

Captain Rainsborow allowed the use of one of the Company's 
docks at Blackwall to trim his ship, the Sampson, on condition that 
he makes good any damage done. That the present state of the 
said dock may be ascertained, Fotherby, Swanly, Steevens, and 
Boatswain Ingram, taking with them such others as Captain Rains- 
borow shall name, are directed to view and write down all defects 
found there. Examination had of the several complaints sent 
from India against William Johnson, late President at Bantam, 
and Henry Johnson, a factor. Both are called into court and the 
accusations read, in which William is accused of having been 
a notorious drunkard, Henry of vicious and incontinent living, and 
both of having conspired, at the death of Mr. Coulson, to cheat the 
Company of a chest containing %'>tS'^ rials of eight. Henry being 
' toucht in conscience ' revealed this last offence and returned his 
share, 1,000 rials, to the Company's cash, as appears by the attesta- 
tion of Thomas Keeling, which is read. Many other accusations 
to the scandal of religion and prejudice of the Company are 
brought against these two men ; but as all cannot be dealt with, 
and Henry confessing his errors and submitting to censure, and 
there being still due to him after all deductions 196/., it is resolved 
that he shall be fined 100 marks (which at his importunity is 
reduced to 36/.), which shall be deducted from the 196/. owing to 
him, and that the remainder shall be paid to him. (i-^- //.) 

Philip Burlamachi to Sir Henry Vane, May 31, 1640 
{Public Record Office : East Indies, vol. ivB, No. 77). 

Heard yesterday at Court that Sir Henry is to meet Secretary 
Windebank and Boswell that morning to see if the treaty concerning 
the East India business is to be made here or at the Hague. Is 
informed that, if there is the least delay in accepting the overture 
made, it may easily hinder the business, because of the absence 



44 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

of the Prince and other considerations. Was bold enough to tell 
him that it would be best to let Boswell go as soon as possible and 
embrace the ofifer to begin the treaty ; and then, the business being 
once started, the rest could be more easily managed according to 
appearances. Could not come himself, as he is expecting Lord 
Goring this morning ; but is anxious not to miss acquainting him 
with his opinion. Begs Vane not to disclose what he has told him. 
(^Holograph. French. ^ /.) 

A Court of Committees, June 3, 1640 [Court Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 190). 

A note is read from the Lord Mayor, acquainting the Court that, 
by direction of the Lord Treasurer and Lord Cottington, he is to 
call upon the Company for the impost of its ship Mary, namely 
4,851/. \6s. 8i(^., which is to be paid to Sir Paul Pindar upon 
account of a tally of io,oco/. for His Majesty's special service. It 
is, however, remembered that 2,019/. ^s. is owing for saltpetre sold 
to the King long ago, which should have been paid last October 
twelvemonth, but has since been charged upon the Lord Mayor's 
collections of impositions and a tally struck for the same payable 
at Michaelmas ; this not being yet paid, it is resolved to send 
word by Mr. Massingberd that the Company expects the sum 
owing for saltpetre to be deducted from the impost demanded for 
the Mary, and will then pay the remainder. The Court being 
reminded that another parcel of saltpetre was lately delivered to 
Mr. Cordwell \ according to the Lord Treasurer and Lord Cotting- 
ton's warrant of the 6th of October last, amounting to 2,732/. \2s. id. 
at 4/. per hundred, with promise of payment within six months after 
delivery, which is not yet paid, Mr. Sherburne is directed to wait 
on Their Lordships and request an order for payment, with con- 
sideration for the delay ; and when this is obtained, then to ask for 
a licence for the Company to transport a small parcel of saltpetre ; 
if this is denied, then to offer the same for the King's sei-vice at 4/. 
per hundred, and to procure an order for payment of both parcels 
together. Consideration had of the answer to be returned to the 
King concerning the subscription, the time for which has now 

^ For particulars see the Calendar of Domestic Stale Papers, vol. cccclvi, no. 47, from 
which it appears that the amount was really 2,733/. ^^j. 2d. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 45 

expired, and to whom to apply to first about it. Debate ensues as 
to the causes which dishearten the generality and prevent them 
from subscribing, which are thought to be the injuries done by the 
Dutch, for which, notwithstanding many promises, no satisfaction 
has been received : the new impositions on Indian goods ^ : the 
depredations committed by Cobb and Ayres in the Red Sea : and 
the Company not being allowed to sell or transport the saltpetre 
brought from the Indies except to the King and at his price. It 
is resolved to apply to Lord Cottington and acquaint him with the 
endeavours made to advance the subscription, and to name the 
above-mentioned causes as being considered the grounds of the 
discouragement, the Governor and the Committees having done as 
much as in them lies to further the intended work. His Lordship's 
advice is to be asked as to what is to be done for the King's satis- 
faction and for the support and continuance of the trade that it may 
not fall into the hands of the Dutch. Regarding this the Company's 
representatives are not to propose a way, but to leave it to the 
King and State to determine. To this end the Governor, the 
Deputy, and certain Committees are entreated to wait with the 
Secretary upon His Lordship this afternoon at his house in Broad 
Street. Next Saturday is appointed for a visit of inspection to 
Black wall and Deptford, when such stores and provisions as are 
unserviceable shall be set aside for sale. A dispute ensues con- 
cerning sale of the calicoes, now a dead commodity, neither linen- 
drapers nor others offering reasonable prices for them ; it is 
proposed to make a division of them to the adventurers, and for 
security of the Company, in case of any disaster or loss by sea, to 
issue a policy of assurance to their value for the Company's 
indemnity. After long argument, some approving of this course 
and others opposing it on the ground of the Company's great debt, 
it is resolved to forbear disposing of the calicoes until the arrival of 
the ships shortly expected. A letter is read from Mr. Baily 
desiring remission of freight on certain goods, which with his 
wages he pretends is all the estate he has gained in five voyages in 
the Company's employ. He alleges that in his last service he only 
received 5/. per month, whereas his predecessor had 15/., and yet he 
was entrusted with the conduct and charge of the Mary to India 
1 3ee p. XX of the previous volume. 



46 COURT MINUTES, ETC, OF THE 

and back (the first forty days excepted). It is remembered that 
Baily has already been allowed remission on goods brought home 
as private trade, and has received the usual gratification of ico/. for 
bringing the Mary into the Downs as her first port ; also that 
information has been given of his conveying secretly out of his ship 
four bales of calicoes. The Court would not have conferred these 
favours upon Bailyhad all this been known in time, for his example 
may have been followed by others of the ship's company ; there- 
fore, though he denies the charge, yet he is deemed unworthy of 
further favours and no resolution is arrived at. (4 pp) 

A Court of Committees, June 5, 1640 {Coin-t Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 194). 

Certain Committees are entreated to examine Captain Milward's 
account. The Governor acquaints the Court that he with some 
Committees waited last Wednesday evening on Lord Cottington 
and told him of the result of the subscription, there being but 
a small sum underwritten. His Lordship, after conference as to 
what might give encouragement for a competent subscription, 
desired the Company to put their opinions in writing before next 
Tuesday, and he would acquaint the King therewith. Mr. Deputy 
having collected the chief heads ' that might encourage men to sub- 
scribe', these are read and Mr. Mun entreated to formulate them ; 
but he excuses himself, alleging that he knows of no more to be 
said than is already contained in the Company's remonstrances, 
and till these are complied with according to the promise given 
by the King and State, none, or very few, will subscribe, the 
alteration of the government being a main obstacle ; also the want 
of restitution from the Dutch. To this it is answered that the 
Dutch Company has given power to the States, and they to their 
Ambassador here, to make reparation for all damages. No con- 
clusion is arrived at by the Court. William Baily is granted 
remission of freight on goods. Mr. Clarke is allowed increased 
tare on certain bags of sugar. Consideration had of the disposal 
of the unsold calicoes. Some advise the delivery of 12/. \os. in 
calicoes to the adventurers, bills of security to be taken for pay- 
ment at a certain time ; while others advise that they be sold out- 
right two for one, rather than keep them to lessen the present 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 47 

interest and waste the stock, which if not prevented will occasion 
'a Muscovia reckoning' ; conclusion herein is deferred. (2^ //.) 

A Court of Committees, June 8, 1640 {Cotirt Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 196). 

Mr. Norris's man to be given 2c/. in recognition of his pains and 
expedition in bringing letters from Captain Mynors, notifying the 
arrival near Falmouth of the Discovery from India, the 40J. paid 
the man by Mr. Cramporne at Plymouth to be deducted, and 
a letter of thanks to be written to Mr. Norris. A Court of Sales is 
appointed to be held next Thursday afternoon, and bills are ordered 
to be set up in the Exchange to notify the sale of the Company's 
calicoes. Steevens is called upon to explain the extraordinary 
expense incurred lately in repairing the Crispian, the Jonah, and 
the Swan, which much exceeds the estimates given. Steevens 
declares his willingness to repair or build ships for the Company 
' by the great ' ; the Court approves of this, but forbears to decide 
herein until satisfaction has been given concerning the estimates. 
In regard of the good news received from the Indies and the 
necessity of sending a good fleet there next spring, it is resolved 
that the Mary shall be substantially repaired, and Steevens is 
required to make an exact survey of her and to give a particular 
estimate of the cost. Remission of freight granted to Francis 
Laurence, who went out in the Jonah, and to Robert Whitchurch, 
who went out in the Discovery, both returning in the Mary ; also to 
John Head, in regard of extraordinary service in his return voyage 
in the Mary in searching for the leak, and because he has served 
the Company twenty-five years, and lost all he had in the Charles. 
(3 PP) 

A Court of Committees, June 10, 1640 {Court Book^ 
vol. xvii, p. 199). 

Gregory Clement desiring remission of freight on fifty pieces 
of brown dutties brought home in the Mary, the Court, considering 
the inconvenience of private trade, decrees that he must pay is. 6d. 
per piece on the said goods. Other small parcels of calicoes 
remaining at the Custom-house are ordered to be delivered on 
payment of the usual freight of is. 6d. ' the booke ', except those sent 



48 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

home by Francis Day to his brother, and those brought home by 
Mr. Taylor, late quartermaster in the Mary. A letter read from 
William Pitt, dated November 12, 1639, from Rajahpore^, to the 
President and Council at Surat, stating that those employed by 
Mr. Courteene have arrived at Rajahpore with two ships, landed 
their goods, and settled a factory ; which is contrary to their com- 
mission received from the King, in which they are forbidden to trade 
where the English Company have planted. By another letter now 
read from Mr. Coggan, &c., at Masulipatam to Surat it appears that 
Mr. Wych's debt is still unpaid ; that Francis Day is accused 
of being a great private trader and very familiar and conversant 
with the servants of Mr. Courteene ; and that Thomas Joyce and 
Thomas Clarke have sold six bales of silk belonging to John Powell 
and the late Robert Littler, pretending they were indebted to them, 
whereas Powell and Littler were indebted to the Company, and 
order had been given to Joyce and Clark to sell the said silk for the 
Company's account towards satisfaction of the said debt. A letter 
read from the Lord Treasurer and Lord Cottington, dated the 
9th instant, directing that payment be made of the whole 4,851/. 
to the Lord Mayor for the use of Sir Paul Pyndar ; the Court (not- 
withstanding a former resolution to stop 2,019/. thereof in satis- 
faction of a debt due from the King for saltpetre), considering there 
will be more impost due speedily for the Discovery s goods, orders 
the whole sum to be paid, with a caution that the Lord Mayor 
shall allow the said debt and satisfy it out of the impost. 
Mr. Joanes demands certain Persian stuffs called 'melliks' that 
were sent as tokens to his wife from the late Agent Gibson, but 
detained because the latter was indebted to the Company ; it is 
resolved that Joanes shall have the stuffs on depositing their value 
in money. Mr. Becke presents the draft of an order for permission 
to transfer his adventure to Mr. Joas Godscall, who has bought it ; 
but the Court, observing that the said order is not yet entered, 
defers answering until it is made authentic. Captain Crane, by his 
servant, demands that the tapestries returned from the Indies may 

• Rajapur, in Ratnagiri District, Bombay Presidency. The letter has not been traced, 
but it is mentioned in 0. C. 1725 as having been sent home in original from Surat. Some 
account of the settlement at Rajapur is given in the Surat letter, which, however, speaks 
scornfully of the trade of the new-comers as ' more spetious then spatious '. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 49 

be delivered to him, conceiving that the proceeds of those already- 
sold will defray all costs. The Court remembering that eight or 
ten years ago 900/. of the Company's cash was spent in recovering 
debts due for tapestries sold, and that this business was formerly 
referred to Messrs. Kerridge and Methwold, they are again desired 
to try to settle it with the Captain. Captain Ditchfield again 
moves for wages for his son's services at Surat ; he is told that his 
son has been educated at the Company's expense and lately given 
the freight of sixty pieces of calicoes as a gratification for his ser- 
vices ; but there not being a full court, resolution herein is deferred. 
The Governor, the Deputy, Alderman Abdy, Messrs. Mun, Ashwell, 
and Sherburne are entreated to attend Mr. Secretary Vane at 
7 o'clock to-morrow morning, to confer about the East India trade. 
(3 PP) 

A Court of Committees, June 17, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 202). 

The Court orders that Mr. Wych's debt be registered, and 
he notified thereof and told that satisfaction is expected from him. 
Mr. Blount is reprimanded for selling, on his own authority, twenty 
bags of pepper to the Deputy and fifty to Stephen Bourneman \sic\ 
the latter tendering as securities George Longe and John Hobson ; 
the Court orders that none of the Company's servants or officers 
in charge of goods shall make any bargain or sale without leave 
from the Court or from the Committees of the Warehouse. 
Blount's offence is overlooked this time, the bargain confirmed, and 
the securities approved, and the Deputy promises to rebate for his 
pepper or to tender Mr. Cradocke as security. The sale of six bags 
of cotton wool by Blount to Mr. Cornish is also confirmed. The 
thirty pepper bags, filled with trash and flags [i.e. leaves], lying 
in the cellar at the Exchange are ordered to be sent to the garden 
at Crosby House to be examined by one or more Committees. 
Captain Ditchfield again requests payment of his son's wages 
at the rate of 20/. per annum ; this is refused, but the 10/. per 
annum paid him for five years is allowed. Mr. De Beck presents 
an order from the Court of Requests concerning the difference 
between himself and the Lord Mayor, Sir Henry Garway, whereby 
the Company is enjoined to permit Mr. De Beck to transfer 



50 COURT MINUTES, ETC.. OF THE 

his adventure to Mr. Godscall ; De Beck is told that the Court 
is engaged on business of great importance, which has to be re- 
ported to the King, therefore resolution on his affairs must be 
deferred. The Court is inclined to grant the request of Mr. Jones 
to receive the tokens sent to his wife and sister by the late Agent 
Gibson, but understanding that there are similar tokens sent 
by others (who will expect a like favour), it is resolved that 
none shall be delivered, but all sold by the candle, and if not bought 
then to be detained in part payment of the great debt Gibson owed 
the Company. John Holloway offers himself and his nephew, 
William Tulley, as securities for fifty bags of pepper, but is refused 
by ballot. The Governor relates the discourse which he, the 
Deputy, and some Committees had the other day with Mr. Secretary 
Vane, according to whose advice a draft was made of the Company's 
aggrievances and discouragements, with which Mr. Secretary 
promised to acquaint the King and to join with Lord Cottington 
and do all good offices for the Company's encouragement and 
support of its trade. This draft is read, and approved, and the 
Secretary required to have two fair copies made, one for Mr. Secre- 
tary Vane, the other for Lord Cottington. A general court 
is appointed to be held next Friday week, as the generality will 
expect to be told of affairs abroad and of the good news brought 
by the Discovery ; also a general court of election is to be summoned 
for the 3rd of July. Forty pieces of calicoes to be delivered to 
Sarah Taylor, whose husband brought them home in the Mary, 
on payment of is. per piece freight. (3^ //.) 

Memorial of the East India Company delivered to 
THE Lords, 1640 {Public Record Office : East Indies^ vol. iv B, 
No. 79).* 

Reciting that the Company formerly presented to the King 
sundry aggrievances which discouraged the continuance of its trade, 
when His Majesty was graciously pleased by an Order in Council, 
dated the loth of December, 1639, to express his good intentions 
for the furtherance and support of ' soe great a business ', and 
ordered the same to be set forth in a preamble made to a book for 
subscription of a new Joint Stock, in which not only His Majesty's 

* a duplicate forms No. 79 I of the same volume. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 51 

subjects were permitted to adventure but foreigners of all nations. 
That the adventurers were further encouraged by being told 
at several public meetings of the Company of the great amendment 
of its trade in India, and also of the advantages ensuing from the 
peace made with the Portuguese, by which the cost of shipping 
is much reduced, fewer vessels being needed for defence. Not- 
withstanding all this, only the inconsiderable sum of 22,500/. has 
been subscribed for this great design ; of which, according to the 
King's directions, notice is hereby given, that His Majesty and the 
State may think of some other way to effect what is desired, and 
so prevent the trade from falling into the hands of the Dutch 
to the dishonour of the King and nation. The memorialists con- 
ceive it their duty to state what in their opinions has hindered the 
subscriptions. First, that in so many years no restitution has been 
obtained from the Dutch for the great losses and wrongs caused 
by them ; that no trade can be carried on in the East Indies with 
safety, for fear of further abuses, unless some such restitution is 
received, or a new treaty or reglement made with the said nation, 
they having become so powerful both by sea and land that 
it is feared they will shortly drive out the Portuguese and become 
sole masters of their country and trade, having already taken many 
places from them and even attempted to take Goa, the principal 
city and the residency of the Viceroy. In the event of such a treaty 
being made, restitution must be had from the Dutch in Europe, 
as the English are far too weak to deal with them in the Indies. 
That for some years the Company has, with the encouragement 
of the State, brought good store of saltpetre into the kingdom, but 
instead of being permitted to sell the same to the best advantage, 
it has had to be kept until the King was pleased to buy it at an 
undervalue, the payment also being long deferred. That the Com- 
pany cannot prosecute its trade on equal terms with the Dutch, 
because of the late impositions laid upon its East Indian commodities. 
That since the preamble was drawn up, in which it was promised 
that Mr. Courteene should send out no more ships to the East 
Indies, he has dispatched one and is preparing another, which 
it is reported will shortly go into those parts ; and this is thought 
to be true because Mr. Courteene's ship, the William, that went 
out last March twelvemonth, has settled a factory at Rajah pore 

£ 2 



5z COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

(where the Company has a factory) contrary to its commission and 
His Majesty's express command by his royal letter. It is also well 
known that Captain Weddall boasted he 'had power to make 
a voyage if his trade would not afifoard it him ' ; and it is feared 
by many that these ships may have the same authority, which will 
endanger not only the lives of the Company's factors, but also their 
whole estates. Some exception is also taken to the directions 
given in the preamble for alteration of the government, which 
it is thought ought to be left, as formerly, to those chosen at 
a general court of election once a year by the adventurers. 

(2 //.) 

A Declaration of the Grievances of the East India 
Company [June, 1640] {Home Miscellaneous, vol. xxxix, f. 153). 

Being expelled by the Dutch from the islands, forts, and block- 
houses built for security of the Company's factors upon the island of 
Polaroone (which island is subject to King Charles by the voluntary 
submission of the natives), in contempt of the twenty-third article of 
the treaty made in 1619 and after publication of the said treaty ; also 
the cutting down and spoiling of the spice trees there by the Dutch, 
who refuse to restore the island without an order from the King of 
England and the States of Holland. The violent taking of the 
island of Lantore from the Company's factors by the Dutch, who 
used many barbarous cruelties, in contempt of the said twenty-third 
article, the island having been given to the factors by the natives in 
the name of the King of England. The Dutch expelling the 
English from the trade in the islands of Molucco, Banda, and 
Amboyna, and horribly murdering their agents and factors there. 
Their usurpation of sovereignty over the English factors at Jakatra 
[Batavia], contrary to the thirtieth article of the treaty mentioned 
above, by which means they were forced to settle upon an island 
called Polagande [Pulo Lagundy], which proved so unhealthy that 
within a short time 120 lost their lives, to the great charge and 
detriment of the Company ; and the unjust and merciless whipping 
of the Company's servants in the public market-place there. The 
exaction by the Dutch at Jakatra of impositions, customs, tolls, 
excises, &c., in negotiations with the English, and their forcible 
extraction from the warehouses in Jakatra of 7,24a rials of eight to 



EAST INDIA COMPANY '^^ 

pay John Maria Moretti, an Italian. Their malicious firing of the 
English factors' dwelling-house, stores, warehouses, and provisions 
in Jakatra, to the value of 200,000 rials of eight. Their blocking 
Bantam for six years, to the exceeding damage of the English ; and 
hindering the latter from recovering their debts in Jambi, and so 
enhancing the price of pepper there that double value had to be 
paid for it. Their protection of the Great Mogul's shipping and 
subjects after they had wrongfully taken from the English factors 
money and goods to the value of 102,952 rials of eight.^ Their 
refusing to pay the English half-customs upon their wares landed in 
Persia, and practising with the king to dispossess them of the profits 
of the same to the value of 80,000 rials of eight, and their desperate 
attempt to murder the chief English factors there. Their outrages 
committed in the Red Sea upon the subjects of the Great Turk 
under English colours, whereby the English Ambassador at 
Constantinople was much troubled. The trading of Sir William 
Courteene in his lifetime, and since his death of his son and 
Mr. Porter, contrary to the privileges granted to the East India 
Company by its patent, whereby it has been and is much dis- 
couraged, the captains, agents, and factors of the said Porter and 
Courteene having, contrary to His Majesty's command, carried 
their ships into Masulipatam and there committed many outrages, 
entered the river in a hostile manner, discharged ordnance into 
the town, killed one native, maimed others, and then fled aboard 
their ships, for which abuses the English agent was imprisoned 
over fifty days, and his countrymen threatened with loss of the 
privileges which they had acquired at so great a cost. The 
settling of a factory by the captains, agents, and factors of Porter 
and Courteene at Rajahpore, within seventy leagues of Surat, 
where the English have usually sent the greater part of their com- 
modities from Europe for sale, notwithstanding His Majesty's 
pleasure formerly and at that instant signified to them by the 
Company's agents there ; and their building a house there for resi- 
dence. The sending yearly by the said Porter and Courteene of 
divers ships into the East Indies, and their now preparing three 
more, notwithstanding two several orders made at the council board 

* Cf. the previous volume, p. 303. For the incident itself see T/ie English Factories in 
India, 1624-9, pp. 6, &c. 



54 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

during His Majesty's presence. The great impost laid upon goods 
imported from the East Indies, more especially upon pepper and 
cloves, the Company's principal commodities, the subsidy and 
impost being raised three times more than formerly ; whereby the 
Company is not able to go to market with neighbouring princes, in 
regard they pay little or nothing, and so daily undersell the Com- 
pany. (2^. Numerous names atid dates are given in the margift 
in attestation of these statements.) 

A Court of Committees, June 19, 1640 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 206). 

The Discovery is to break bulk next Monday ; and meanwhile her 
master is directed to hasten out her ordnance and lumber, and to 
look carefully to the sending up of private trade. Mr. Munns is 
entreated to take first turn on Monday. Mr. Deputy and Mr. 
Wilson are desired to attend the Lord Privy Seal and Lord Dorset 
about Mr. Cox's reference. Mr. Sherburne to be given 10/., for 
which he is to account. Mr. Daniel Harvey's difference with the 
Company is referred to the next court. Mrs. Slade to have 160 pieces 
of calicoes delivered her on paying for fifty. Henry Johnson's desk, 
left in John Spiller's custody, to be given him. One month to be 
deducted from the pay of those who left the Discovery at Plymouth, 
or before her arrival at Erith. (^ />.) 

A Court of Committees, June 26, 1640 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 207). 

Payment ordered to Mr. Methwold of the 450/. due to the Conde 
de Lynharres. The general letters are considered, and the Court 
directs that only those parts indicated by a private mark in the 
margin shall be read to the generality. The Governor remarks that 
in the said letters two particulars are worthy of consideration as 
tending much to the profit of the Company ; the desire that a 
double provision of coral (which yields more advantage than all 
other commodities) be sent, and also 300 cloths. Now being the 
time for provision of both, he desires the Court to consider and 
resolve on this matter. Some are of opinion that by the preamble 
the Company is restrained from sending out more stock, and so 
refuse to engage themselves further, but wish the estate to be drawn 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 55 

home, the debts paid, and what remains divided ; while others think 
that, as the subscription is not full, the preamble is void and the 
Company at liberty to do as it pleases. No commodity affording 
so much profit as coral, many of the Committees offer to take it off 
the Company's hands on arrival, and transport it to India on their 
own adventure. After long dispute it is resolved by erection of 
hands to give order for 6,000/. worth of coral to be bought ; and 
certain Committees are entreated to write in the Company's name 
to Mr. Job Throgmorton to provide this amount, and not to employ 
(as formerly) the Guidances *. To prevent any hindrance in buying 
the coral, strict secrecy is enjoined, and it is resolved that if any of 
the Company buy or bring over any coral, hoping to transport it 
privately, they shall be prevented and none of it shall be bought from 
them on any terms. Resolution with regard to the 300 cloths is 
deferred. A question arising what tare ought to be allowed for cotton 
yarn lately bought by Mr. Langham, and it being alleged that the 
customary allowance has been ^^ lb. on a bag, trial is ordered to be 
made of ten or twenty bags, and as the medium shall fall out so 
allowance shall be made. Mr. De Beck presses for performance of 
the decree lately made in the Court of Requests for the transfer of 
his adventure in the Third Joint Stock to Mr. Godscall ; he is 
entreated to wait till this day sennight for an answer, the Court 
being very busy because of the General Court to be held in the after- 
noon, Mr. Sambrooke reads the balance of the Company's estate, 
and is directed to have it in readiness, so that if the generality 
desire it may be read for their satisfaction. (3 pj>.) 

A General Court, June 26, 1640 (Conr/ Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 210). 

Mr. Governor acquaints the generality that they are assembled 
to express, according to custom, their thankfulness to God for send- 
ing the Discovery home in safety from Surat with a plentiful return 
of goods, and the advice that three ships from the southwards and 
one from the northwards maybe expected shortly. By a letter now 
received it appears that affairs in India have never been in a more 
hopeful condition, both in respect of the price and plenty of all sorts 

' The well-known Florentine family of the name of Guadagni, Their beautiful palazzo, 
near Santo Spirito, is still one of the sights of the city. 



S6 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

of commodities, and the alteration of their principals and factors at 
Surat, Persia, Bantam, and the Coast of Coromandel, all which 
factories are reduced to such good order that expenses are much 
lessened, factors of ill-repute have been removed, and only those 
who are able and honest left in places of trust ; by which means it 
is hoped that the Company's affairs will in future be managed to 
greater profit and advantage than formerly. Notwithstanding these 
blessings, the peace with the Portugals, with the benefits derived 
from free commerce with them, admittance to their ports, and the 
profit of freight in transporting their goods from port to port, Mr. 
Governor observes that the generality are still disheartened, as is 
apparent by their poor attendance at this meeting ; therefore, to 
assure them of the truth of what has been stated, it has been decided 
to read the general letters, or, as they are long and would take up 
too much time, such portions of them as relate more nearly to the 
Company's affairs and the passage of Monsieur Regament, the 
Frenchman brought hither by Captain Mynors.^ This is done and 

* This unwilling guest was no doubt the Gilles R^zimont who made several voyages 
from Dieppe to the East from 1633 onwards. He was one of the leading figures in the 
Conipagnie iV Orient, established in 1642 for the colonization of Madagascar, and himself 
commanded an expedition to that island in 1643 (Weber's Compagnie Fran^aise des Indes, 
pp. 72, 77). The circumstances of his seizure are described in a letter from Surat to the 
Company (0. C 1725), which, after mentioning the departure of the Discovery from 
Mocha on August 19, 1639, and her arrival at Swally on September 21, goes on to say : 
' In her returne, not long after she was cleare of the Bab, they encountred Eandrackt, 
a ship of Diepe comanded by one Regamont, the same that three yeares since pillaged 
the severall vessells of Dio ; who being invited on board readily consented and was theare 
deteyned prisoner ; whom his consorts would willingly have rescued, who, finding their 
ship much nimbler then yours both for saile and steerage, presumed to come neare enough 
to discharge divers great shott against the Discovery without doing the least harme. 
What hurt those the Discovery repaid her withall did, is unknowne, yet judged impor- 
tant because she so abruptly left them. It then appeared that they had not robbed any 
vessell, and that conception is since confirmed not only by Regamont, who was brought 
hither on the Discovery, but also by the severall safe arrivalls of as many vessells as 
belonged to this and Cambaiett port. . . . His ship was of burthen about 300 tonus, had 
18 guns, and sayled excellently well; which best steaded her, otherwise she had also 
accompanied the Discovery hither, as her comander doth the Discovery to England, 
wheare Mr. Minors is directed (if God spares him life) safely to deliver him unto yon, and 
in the voyage to continue unto him such curteous usage as wee have hitherto affoarded him.' 

The kidnapping of a French captain on mere suspicion of piracy was an outrage for 
which one would have expected the Company to make immediate atonement and apologies ; 
but instead of this they entered an action against R6zimont in the Admiralty Court for 
50,000/. After much delay, however, they consented to withdraw the charge, and the 
unfortunate captain was released in June, 1641. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY ^7 

great satisfaction given the generality ; but in spite of all induce- 
ments and persuasion of the Governor and others they are not 
willing to subscribe for a new stock, but urge that the old be 
speedily drawn home ; then, and not before, they will think about 
a new subscription. Captain Mihvard renews his suit for remission 
of brokes and interest charged upon his adventure in the Third Joint 
Stock. The Court, in regard of the great losses he has sustained, 
agrees that his broke shall be reduced from 18/. to 8/. per cent, and 
his interest remitted from the time of his failing. Consideration 
had of the petition of John Dike, merchant, that his subscription of 
300/. upon the Third Joint Stock be annulled and the brokes due on 
it remitted, and that he may receive the dividend upon his adven- 
ture of 275/. in the Second Joint Stock ; it is resolved to grant his 
requests, but he is not to receive his divisions on the Second Joint 
Stock until the other adventurers have been paid according to that 
proportion. Mr. Governor moves the necessity imposed upon the 
Company by advices received from India of making speedy pro- 
vision of two commodities for dispatch in the ships, which will cost 
at least 12,000/. ; by erection of hands it is resolved that 12,000/. be 
spent for this purpose. Letter read from Thomas Smethwicke, 
Senior, from ' the Poultrey Compter 7 he being imprisoned upon an 
execution from the Assurance Office for '^^L, desiring that to effect 
his release 200/. of his stock be sold by the candle, and that the 
Company, or any one of them, would send 40/. in gold by the bearer 
to discharge the debt.^ Mr. Smethwicke's demand to have a copy 
of the invoices of the Company's particular ships, that he may know 
the rates and price paid for goods in India ' the first penny ', is 
refused by a general erection of hands. {2>hPP-) 

The allegation that Rezimont had plundered some Diu junks three years before seems 
to connect him with the exploits of the St. Lois, referred to on p. 260 of the previous 
volume. As Mr. Ferguson has pointed out, there is an interesting mention of this vessel 
in the Batavia Dagh- Register for 1636, where it is stated that she intended to plunder the 
Moorish ships. On the other hand, a letter from Paris, among the Domestic State Papers 
(vol. cccclx.x.x, no. 58), declares that the captures attributed to Rezimont were really 
made by the English themselves — alluding, apparently, to the piracies of the Roebuck 
in 1635. 

* One of the prisons under the control of the Sheriffs of London. It stood on the north 
side of the Poultry, on the site of the present Chapel Place, and was pulled down in 1817. 
A view of it is given in Old and New Loudon, vol. i, p. 421. 

* The decision is not recorded ; so probably the request was negatived. 



58 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Petition from Thomas Smethwicke to the King [about 
June, 1640] {Public Record Office : East Indies, vol. ivB, No. 78). 

Setting forth that the East India trade may soon be put in a 
flourishing condition for ample prosecution, to the great increase of 
His Majesty's customs, the honour of the nation, and content and 
profit of the adventurers, besides an annual profit of at least 40,000/. 
to the King without damage to any one or disbursement of the royal 
treasure; and praying that this may be referred to the Lord Treasurer 
and Lord Cottington to consider how it may best be effected, and 
that they may certify their opinions to the King or to the Lords 
Commissioners for Trade that order may be given accordingly. 

{\P-) 

A Court of Committees, July i, 1640 {Conrf Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 214). 

Upon information given in a note from Sir Nicholas Crispe that 
there was landed from the Discovery at or near Plymouth (with 
the permission of her officers) 3,000 [lb.] weight of indigo, which has 
since been sent to Bristol and other parts, Captain Mynors, John 
Smith, purser, his mate John Perkins, Boatswain Went, his mate 
John Young, and James Johnson are questioned. They protest 
their innocence and disbelief in the truth of the information, but 
the Court, thinking fit to examine further into this, orders that 
the wages of the said officers be stopped and only the common 
men discharged. Mr. Sherburne reports that in accordance with 
the command of Mr. Secretary Vane he, accompanied by Messrs. 
Wild, Methwold, and Markham, went to Mr. Secretary's house in 
Whitehall last Sunday about the business of Captain Crane, who 
was also present ; after hearing the matter Mr. Secretary advised 
that the two suits of hangings lately returned from India should 
be delivered to the Captain, and that the dispute as to the accounts 
should be settled by arbitration. This Mr, Secretary thought 
would be a better way than appealing to the Council Board or 
to a committee of the Lords ; he also intimated the King's good 
affection to the Captain and His Majesty's interest in this business. 
At the request of Thomas Smethwicke, Senior, 20c/. of his adven- 
ture is put up for sale by the candle. The first 100/. is set up at 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 59 

the rate of 90/. and bought by John Holloway at 91/. ; the other 
100/. is valued at 95/, and bought by Mr. Holloway at 95/. 10s., 
there being 100/. fully divided and taken out. Daniel Harvey's 
dispute with the Company concerning want of weight in silk is 
referred for settlement to certain Committees. Richard Swinc-le- 
hurst is given 30/. for supplying Thomas Chauncy's place at the 
Exchange cellar for six months ; resolution as to the increase of 
his salary is deferred. {2 pp.) 

A Court of Committees, July 3, 1640 {Couri Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 316). 

A letter is read from Mr. Chauncy, acknowledging himself to 
be indebted 280/. and desiring that this sum may be charged to 
his account, so that the Company may receive satisfaction by his 
adventure ; for payment of this 28c/. he binds himself under his 
hand and seal attested by his wife in the sum of 500/., which he 
offers to forfeit if anything further is proved against him. 
Mr. Acton moves on behalf of the Lord Mayor the deferring of 
the transfer of Mr. De Beck's adventure to Mr. Godscall, because 
of a discovery lately made ; the Court agrees to this, and on 
Mr. Godscall demanding performance of the decree made in the 
Court of Requests, he is told that the Lord Mayor, on account 
of his great business for the King, has had no time to take care 
of his own cause, and so the transfer must be put off for a time ; 
but if he and Mr. De Beck will secure the Company from being 
troubled further by the Lord Mayor about this affair, the Court 
will reconsider it. It is resolved to settle Captain Crane's business 
this day sennight ; in the meantime he is to name two arbitrators 
and the Company two, and an umpire is to be chosen ; on this 
being done, and bonds entered into on both sides, the hangings 
shall be delivered. George Gosnell, late purser in the Jonas, is 
questioned concerning a bale of baftas missing from the said ship ; 
he protests his innocence, but submits himself to the favour of 
the Court ; whereupon he is fined twenty marks as an example. 
The Court orders that in future the boatswain of every ship shall 
keep account with the purser of all goods that come in and go out 
of the ship, giving a note of the same to the purser, and at the 
return of the ship shall deliver a fair book hereof to the Company; 



6o COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

this Mr. Bowen is to insert in the sea commission. At the adding 
up of Captain Millward's account, according to the order of the 
last General Court, 1,333/. appeared due to make up his division 
to 50 per cent, in silk ; this he now desires to receive in ready 
money, but is denied and a warrant is ordered to be given him 
to receive it in silk. John Spiller's bills, one of 8/. 4s. 4d. for 
discharging the Discovery^ the other of 6/. 9^-. 6^. for dinners at 
Blackwall, to be paid. Mr. Sherburne is given one hundred nobles 
for extraordinary services. {%\ pp.) 

A General Court of Election, July 3, 1640 (Cot^rt Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 219). 

Motion is made by Mr. Smithwicke as to the necessity of electing 
a Deputy, on pretence that the Company's charter does not 
warrant it. ^ At his desire, that part of the charter is read ; when 
Mr. Chamberlaine replies that the time might have been spared, 
for, if there has been an error, it has been persisted in ever since 
the charter was granted ; it being generally conceived, and now 
ascertained, that a Governor, Deputy, Treasurer, and twenty-four 
Committees are to be elected annually. Mr. Governor acknowledges 
the great obligation he is under to the generality for their love and 
good opinion, and for the trust placed in him and in his management 
of their affairs, observing that if his conduct has not answered their 
expectations, yet he has acted honestly and faithfully according to 
his ability ; he now desires that some able man may take his 
place. The Court returns him hearty thanks, and on his with- 
drawing nominates Sir Henry Garway (now Lord Mayor), Sir 
Christopher Cletherowe, Alderman Abdy, and Alderman Cordwell ; 
by general erection of hands the choice falls again upon Sir 
Christopher Cletherowe, who on being informed returns to his 
chair, expresses his gratitude, and takes the accustomed oath. 
Mr. Cockayne acknowledges his obligation for having been chosen 
Deputy for the past year, but entreats not to be put up for elec- 
tion again, on account of his many employments, as well for the 
Turkey Company as for his own affairs. The generality, knowing 
his great experience and confident of his faithfulness, re-elect him 

* The same objection had been raised and refnted in 1635" and again in 1639 ( see the 
previous volume, pp. 72, 312). 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 6i 

by general consent ; on being acquainted with this, he at first 
demurs, but on entreaty accepts the post and is sworn accordingly. 
The Court next proceeds to elect a Treasurer, Robert Bateman 
praying, in regard of his age and weakness, to be discharged. 
Alderman Highlord, Robert Bateman, and Rowland Wilson are 
nominated ; whereupon Bateman is re-elected, the Court having 
had such long experience of his honesty and sufficiency. He 
returns the generality thanks, declaring that were he not assisted 
by John Massingberd he would be unable to accept the post. Six 
Committees having, according to the tenor of the charter, to 
retire. Alderman Fenn and Mr. Lewis Roberts being dead, it is 
agreed by erection of hands that they and Sir James Cambell, Sir 
Nicholas Crispe, Abraham Reynardson, and Edward Abbott 
shall be succeeded by Alderman Soame, George Clarke, Richard 
Middleton, John Bludworth, William Methwold, and John Massing- 
berd ; and the following Committees continued for the ensuing 
year, viz., Sir Morris Abbott, Sir Henry Garway, Aldermen 
Cordwell, Gayre, Abdy, and Highlord, Messrs. John Holloway, 
Thomas Munns, [Thomas] Stiles, Thomas Spurstowe, William 
Ashwell, Matthew Craddock, Rowland Wilson, John Langham, 
John Trott, Richard Davies, William Francklyn, and Thomas 
Kerridge. The choice of the Company's Secretary, Accountant, 
Auditor, and other officers is left to the Court of Committees, 
who best know their abilities. One of the generality proposes 
that two constant courts be kept twice a year, at Michaelmas and 
Easter; this Mr. Governor promises shall be done. (4i//-) 

Answer of Mr. Smithv^ick to certain charges, July 9, 
1640 {Public Record Office : Dom. Chas. /, vol. cccclix. No. 66). 

For three things am I maligned and hated by some aldermen 
and other citizens of London. For hindering a few of them from 
deceiving the East India Company of 500,000/. or 600,000/. at one 
time, and for endeavouring to advance the East India trade, and 
hindering them from destroying it as to this kingdom. For giving 
1,000/. to the repairing of St. Paul's, and being an instrument 
to procure that work to go on. For offering to give 100/. to His 
Majesty the last year towards the charge of the then expedition 
for Scotland. Hereupon it was given out that I was a lunatic, and 



6a COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

that I could not have paid the loo/. if it had been called for. And 
when the rebellious rout was up against His Grace of Canterbury 
and others, it was reported that I had betrayed all the rich citizens 
by giving up a list to His Majesty and the Lords of 300 names 
who were able each to give or lend to the King i ,000/. apiece. To 
which I answer, that I could as well have paid the 100/, offered 
as have bestowed 120/. this year on my son's outfit for this year's 
expedition. Now seeing the citizens accuse me and wish me much 
evil causelessly, I desire I may be admitted to show how 200,000/. 
or 300,000/, may in probability be obtained from the citizens for 
the King's service, and that fairly, tolerably, and speedily. That 
the ways in which I have already showed to the Lord Treasurer 
and Lord Cottington may be tried and put in execution ; how the 
East India trade may soon be settled and put into a way for an 
ample prosecution thereof, to the great profit of the Adventurers 
and to the advancement of the King's revenue 50,000/. per annum, 
besides a great increase of customs. That trial may be made of the 
course which I shall propound, how sufficient money may be fairly 
raised to finish the repairs of St. Paul's, and every year to build 
one new church or chapel in some of the great out parishes of 
London, where there are above 10, 15, or 20 thousand persons 
inhabitants in a parish and but one church, an evil to be remedied 
with all expedition for the honour of God. (i /.) 

A Court of Committees, July 10, 1640 [Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 223). 

Mr. Acton's bill of 3/. \s. 4d. for law causes to be paid. Thomas 
Smethwicke, Junior, transfers his adventure of 200/. in the Third 
Joint Stock, upon which is divided 100/., with all profits to his 
father, Thomas Smethwicke. Thomas Smethwicke, Senior, desires 
leave to peruse the Company's letters and accounts in order to 
show that it has been wronged of 1,000/., or 500/. at the least, and 
he also desires a copy of the invoice of the Discovery and of the 
other ships as they come home ; both these requests are refused as 
unfit and unreasonable. John Spiller is appointed land purser for 
discharge of the London, and is promised that on discharge of 
the ships his motion for increased salary shall be considered. Mr. 
Steevens presents an estimate of the cost of repairing the Mary, 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 6^ 

which amounts to 2,105/. Some think it would be better to break 
up the ship than to spend so much money on her, and advise 
that she be valued and sold outright ; but the Court adheres to its 
former resolution to have her repaired ; nevertheless it is agreed 
that she shall be first valued, and Messrs. Rainsborough, Titchin, 
Southan, Pott, Stevens, and Svvanley, or any four of them, are 
entreated to survey and report on the said ship. Meanwhile Stevens 
is required to ascertain where the best planks and timber may 
be had for the repairs. Certain Committees are entreated to 
consider all petitions for remission of freight brought home in the 
London or other ships, and to act therein as they shall think fit. 
(24 /A) 

A Court of Committees, July ii, 1640 [Cotirt Book,vo\..yi\\\, 
P- 235). 

Mr. Governor acquaints the Court that Dr. Reeve, the King's 
advocate, had been with him and desired that some settlement 
be made with Guy Bath, late a factor in Persia ; it is resolved to 
call a special court to decide this business. The letters from 
Bantam brought by the William and Reformation are read. The 
Court observes that some of those returning come well recommended ; 
and calling to mind the Black Book kept for record of all errors, 
now resolves that a White Book be kept in which to register 
all good and faithful service rendered, that the Company may 
know from time to time who are fittest to be employed, Cappur 
IS appointed to keep this book as well as the other. It is also 
noted that pepper is bought at ^s. the picul but invoiced at 8j-. ; 
the Court, not understanding this, resolves to look into the matter. 
It is likewise observed that blacks have to be hired at three rials of 
eight per month to navigate the Company's ships in the Indies, 
there not being sufl^cient Englishmen ; which is a waste of the quick 
stock, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees, July 15, 1640 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 227). 

The estimate presented by Stevens for repairing the Mary is 
further examined, together with the report of Captain Rainsborough 
and others appointed to survey and value the said ship ; the report 



64 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

concurs with the estimate, and states that the hull of the Mary 
is not worth more than 600/. After long debate, the Court 
confirms its former resolution to have the Mary repaired, more 
especially as Stevens states that no similar ship could be built 
for less than 8,000/. ; and he is therefore ordered to proceed with 
the work at once. Mr. Massingberd reports that upon a rumour 
of the King's intention to coin copper money ^, Lady Moulson, 
who has lent the Company upon bills a round sum which is now 
due, requires to be repaid unless assurance is given that the debt 
shall be paid either in gold or silver coin at its present value. The 
Court, considering the importance of this subject and that this 
exception is now generally made by all who lend out money at 
interest, and how prejudicial it would be to the Company should 
others likewise call in their money, resolves to acquaint the King 
and State ; direction is accordingly given to the Secretary to draw 
up a draft of a petition to the Lords of the Council, submitting 
that, if His Majesty proceeds with his intention, not only will the 
adventurers be disheartened and discouraged but the Company's 
trade, which has never been in a more hopeful condition, will be 
much endangered. This draft being read and altered as is thought 
fit, the Court directs that it be engrossed, and entreats the Governor, 
with Messrs. Wilson, Middleton, and Ashwell, to present it to the 
Lords in the afternoon. Mr. Younge is appointed for discharge of 
the William and Mr. Cappur for the Reforviation. Mr. Blount 
reporting that the coopers are unable to make casks at the rate 
formerly allowed, because of the present dearness of food, their 
allowance is increased from 17^-. to iSj. per tun. The Governor 
proposes that a ship be sent to the Coast to provide cloths for the 
southern factories ; the Reformation is suggested, and Stevens 
is directed to survey and report upon her. Such reparations as 
are necessary in and about the east dock in the Yard are ordered 
to be carried out. A motion is made to set a valuation upon the 
present Joint Stock, that it may be turned over to another account; 
to this it is answered that, when all the goods now come home are 
disposed of, it will be fit to nominate a committee of the generality 

' ' Brasse money ' in the margin ; and Ludlow {Memoirs, vol. i, p. 9) uses the same 
term. The proposal really was to issue a new shilling containing only threepennyworth 
of silver, alloyed with copper (see Ruding's Annals of the Coinage, vol. ii, p. 257). 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 65 

to join with the standing committee, as is customary, to consider 
an indifferent valuation between the new and the old adventurers. 
Certain Committees are desired to buy 100 white cloths at from 
9/. to 13/. per cloth. William Kitchin, who was paid 8/. 4^. for 
piloting the Discovery from Plymouth to the Downs, is, on petition, 
given an additional 2/. {zPP) 

A Court of Committees, July 17, 1640 (Cour^ Book, vol xvii, 
p. 230). 

Great sums of money having been issued to many of the Com- 
pany's servants, of which no timely account has been given, the 
Court resolves that those who receive the Company's money shall 
be enjoined to deliver in an account once a month, and shall not be 
permitted to receive any more until such accounts are audited and 
passed ; but, as deliberation is necessary before settling a rule to be 
constantly observed hereafter, it is resolved to hold a meeting 
to-morrow to consult on this particular business. The Governor 
relates that he went to Whitehall, accompanied by certain Com- 
mittees, intending to present the Company's petition concerning 
copper money to the King and Lords ; but meeting Lord Dorset 
on the way, and telling him of their errand, he advised them to 
wait, as many merchants and others intended to deliver like 
petitions that afternoon, and the King might think they had all 
combined together. His Lordship further advised that the Lord 
Treasurer and Lord Cottington should be first acquainted with the 
petition, and if they give no satisfactory answer, then it might be 
presented to the Lords at the next meeting. This advice was 
followed, and the Lord Treasurer, after hearing the petition, observed 
that the reasons alleged by the Company were similar to those 
brought forward by others, and had already been considered by 
His Majesty and the Lords ; and unless new reasons could be 
adduced he could give little comfort, as they had already tried 
to dissuade the King from this course, but His Majesty replied 
that his necessities and present occasions must be supplied and, 
failing any other, by this means. Mr. Governor declared that 
the consequence would be the failing and loss of the East India 
trade, for if the Company's creditors call in their money it cannot 
subsist, its debt at interest being above 250,000/. and there 



66 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

being a large return of goods which it will not know how to sell. 
These and other reasons were alleged by Mr. Governor, but 
seeing that none would prevail he and his colleagues left and went 
to Lord Cottington, where the same ill success attended them. 
The Court, considering that all that is necessary has been done, 
resolves to rest quiet and await the event. Mr. Governor further 
relates that he reminded Lord Cottington of the clause in the 
preamble which prohibits the Company from sending any more 
quick stock to the East Indies upon the old account after last May, 
and requested him to explain whether, as the subscription is not going 
on, the Company is restrained by this clause. His Lordship replied 
that the King had referred this paper to his and Secretary Vane's 
consideration, and they would appoint a time to confer with 
Mr. Governor and other Committees about it on being reminded. 
The Court desires the Secretary to attend Their Honours accordingly. 
Mr. Cappur is directed to procure a warrant from the Lord Warden 
of the Cinque Ports for the arrest of Captain Cobb, it being under- 
stood that, as the Captain's dwelling is within the limits of the 
Ports, he can only be arrested by a special warrant from His 
Lordship. Remission of freight on divers drugs is allowed to 
Captain Mynors. The demand of Abraham Aldington for money 
due unto him is referred for consideration till the return of 
Mr. Methwold. Mr. Massingberd reporting that the debts owing 
to the Company by divers adventurers amount to 14,000/. and 
that, though bills for the same have been due two months, yet 
payment is not made, Mr. Ashwell is entreated to call upon the 
several debtors for payment, the Company having much need 
of money for mariners' wages and other pressing occasions. (3^ pp.) 

A Court of Committees, July 18, 1640 {Court Bool\ 
vol. xvii, p. 233). 

The following duties are allotted to the several Committees, 
viz., the supervision of all warehouses and of Mr. Blount's work; 
of the Exchange cellar ; of accounts of all money disbursed and of 
the Treasury ; of all business at Blackwall ; the perfecting of the 
accounts of returning or deceased factors ; the taking of bills and 
calling in of debts ; the provision of cloth and supervision of its 
dyeing and imbaling ; the perusal of letters from all factories, and 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 67 

the notification of stores and provisions wanted for the ships, and 
collection of the same ; the settlement with mariners and others as 
to private trade ; the provision of beef and pork ; of fish and 
groceries ; of bread, beer, cider, iron, tin, lead, and like requisites ; 
of wine, ' wineager, beere-aeger ' ^, aquavitae, sweet and rape oil, 
French barley, and plates for bread rooms ; of cordage, hemp, 
pitch, tar, rosin, masts, deals, wainscot, timber, planks, sheathing 
boards, tree-nails, pipe and hogshead staves, casks, apparel for 
mariners, and billets ; of quicksilver, coral, cloth, and all presents ; 
of powder, shot, ordnance, flags, canvas for sails, pepper-bags, 
waistcloths, boltropes, and stores for gunners, cooks, armourers, 
boatswains, stewards, and carpenters ; of gold and silver ; hiring of 
mariners ; supervision of the Auditor and of the Bookkeeper ; 
Mr, Massingbird, assisted by the Auditor and Accountant, to 
present monthly a list of those in debt to the Company ; Messrs. 
Ashwell and Methwold to have the care of all suits in the Admiralty, 
and Messrs. Kerridge and Methwold to see that Mr. Cappur enters 
correctly in the Black Book all complaints received from the East 
Indies, and all commendations in the White Book. Mr. Cappur is 
directed to remind the Court and also particular Committees of 
business to be transacted, and Richard Swinglehurst is required to 
notify Cappur of all that passes in court. Ordered that the London 
be discharged first, then the Reformation, and lastly the William ; 
meanwhile the lumber is to be taken out of the two last ships. 
Sambrooke reports that, since John Mountney left, the account of 
expenses and issue of stores in charge of the Husband has not been 
sent in ; whereupon he is directed to consult with Mr. Markham on 
this business and report to the Court within a fortnight. (3!//.) 

A Court of Committees, July 22, 1640 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 

P- 237). 

On receipt of private information from one of the Farmer's 
Deputies at Dover of the great quantity of private trade landed 
from the London, the William, and the Reformation, the Court 
desires the advice and assistance of Sir Nicholas Crispe in discover- 
ing and seizing the same. He promises to write and order help to 
be given the Company ; John Younge, being the most able and 

^ Vinegar produced by the fermentation o beer. 

F a 



68 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

experienced man for this purpose, is directed to take the letter, his 
place for discharge of the William to be supplied by Mr. Barnes 
(who came home commander in her) and the purser. A charge of 
4/. interest is remitted to Mr. Vincent, linendraper. Thomas 
Fovvnes, son-in-law to Sir Nicholas Crispe, is admitted gratis a free 
brother of the Company. Captain Wills presents three Portuguese, 
who came with him from Goa in the London. They return thanks 
to the Court for their accommodation and the respect shown to 
them, and profess that they will always be ready to do the Company 
service ; their request that their trunks may be removed from the 
London and put aboard a ship now bound for Lisbon without being 
first brought to the Custom-house is assented to. The same favour 
is granted a Danish minister who came in the William from Bantam. 
John Browne offering to buy at a disinterested valuation all the 
Company's iron ordnance, Alderman Gayre and Captain Stiles are 
desired to ascertain his terms and report to the Court. Notice to 
be given of a general court appointed to be held this day sennight, 
that the generality may signify how the goods returned in the 
ships shall be sold, {p-hpp-) 

A Court of Committees, July 24, 1640 {Court Booky vol. xvii, 
P- 239)- 

Upon information received from the President and Council in 
India of the misdemeanours of Thomas Clarke and Richard Hudson, 
two factors employed at the Coast of Coromandel and now come 
home in the William, they were arrested and imprisoned on an 
action of 1,000/. each entered against them in the 'Compter 
Poultrey ' ; several petitions from them are now read, in which for 
many reasons and on account of ' this contagious tyme, and for that 
the sicknes is in the said prison, which may endanger their lyves ', 
they beg to be released on bail. The Court, considering that, 
if they do fall sick and die, an ill interpretation may be put upon 
their arrest, and the Company likewise lose all hope of satisfaction, 
orders that on assigning all their wages, debts, and goods to the 
Company and entering into a bond of i ,000/. to make good any- 
thing over and above this sum found to be owing, and agreeing to 
attend the Court daily and not leave the kingdom without per- 
mission, they be at once released and the action against them 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 69 

withdrawn. Mr. Governor relates that Secretary Vane told him 
yesterday that the Company's aggrievances, lately delivered to 
himself and Lord Cottington, had been referred by the King to the 
Lord High Admiral, the Lord Treasurer, Lord Cottington, Secre- 
tary Windebank, and himself, and they hoped to have leisure 
to consider them some time next week. Thereupon it is resolved 
that extracts be made from the general letters concerning the pro- 
ceedings of the Dutch against the Company and presented to Their 
Honours before their next meeting. Mr. Smethwicke alleges that 
there has been an error made in the Company's books, amounting 
to 500/. and upwards, for discovery of which he desires to see the 
books of accounts. The Court remembers that this request has 
been several times preferred and refused, because neither the nature 
of the error nor the year in which it was committed was stated, and 
it was thought that Smethwicke's chief desire was to pry into the 
Company's books ; but he persisting in his request the books are 
produced. Thereupon he wishes to see the payments made in 
1635 (when he was a Committee) for gratifications conferred on 
the Governor, Deputy, Treasurer, and the rest of the Committees, 
which that year by general consent were reduced one half; this he 
now finds was not observed, and so the Company prejudiced 500/. 
and more. He also protests against the inequality of the gratifica- 
tions given to the Committees at the discretion of the Governor, 
Deputy, and Treasurer, when some were favoured more than 
others ; and desires a list of the particular sums paid to the 
Governor, Deputy, Treasurer, and Committees the last five or 
six years. The Court refuses to allow this, thinking that his 
pretended service proceeds more from malice to some particular 
person than from good affection to the Company. (2^//).) 

A Court of Committees, July 29, 1640 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 242). 

Approval is given to a contract with Mr. Newman, who has 
offered to supply the Company from Ireland (on obtaining the 
Lord Lieutenant's warrant) with 200,000 pipestaves, 50,000 hogs- 
headstaves, 50,000 headings, and 30,000 barrelstaves, to be de- 
livered at the Yard at Blackwall. The King of Macassar's letter 
is delivered to Mr. Sherburne to give to Mr. Secretary Vane, with 



70 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

the request that he will present it to King Charles and ascertain 
when and where His Majesty will receive the present accompany- 
ing it. Mr. Acton's bill of 7/. is. for law causes to be paid. 
Resolved to notify the generality this afternoon of the intended 
sermon of thanksgiving for the safe arrival of the Company's ships ; 
also to read them such parts of the general letters as have been 
marked. The bonds of Thomas Clarke and Richard Hudson 
for turning over their wages &c. to the Company are read and 
allowed, and Sambrooke is required to deliver in before next 
Friday a written account of all money and other estate received 
from Clarke, and to produce the Company's bill given out in 
Clarke's name for payment of 200/. or thereabouts, which is now 
assigned to the Company in part satisfaction. Upon reading an 
order from the Court of Requests, Mr. De Beck's adventure in the 
Third Joint Stock is transferred to Joas Godscall with all profits, 
Mr. De Beck promising to clear all brokes and other debts charged 
upon it. {2 pp.) 

A General Court, July 29, 1640 {Court Book, vol. xvii, p. 244). 

The Governor observes that it is not many months since they 
assembled to give thanks to Almighty God for the safe arrival 
of the Royal Mary after a long and dangerous voyage ; that now 
they have met to return thanks for the arrival of the Discovery and 
London from Surat and of the William and Reformation from 
Bantam, they all having had a quick passage ; he desires the 
generality not only to return thanks in private but publicly in the 
house of God, to which end this day three weeks has been appointed 
for a service to be held in the parish church. The Committees 
think it right to inform the generality of the state of the Company's 
affairs, and that those portions of the general letters relating 
thereto should be read. This is done and gives much satisfaction. 
Mr. Governor declares that if the generality ' will let fall the trade 
to the Dutch, they may ', for the hands of the Committees are tied 
and they cannot, neither will they, send any more stock to India 
without the general consent, though they think that a ship should 
be dispatched next October with a stock of 10,00c/. for Masuli- 
patam. Motion is made that the Company's debt be extinguished 
and an end made of the present Stock ; to which Mr. Deputy 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 71 

replies that if this had been done a year ago, according to the wish 
of some, the adventure would have only produced 70/. per cent., 
whereas now they may have cent, per cent. ; that an end cannot be 
made without a valuation, and that the accounts having come from 
Bantam in the newly arrived ships it can now be seen how matters 
stand ; there are already goods sufficient to lade a big ship, besides 
the large stock sent into those parts, and in the Crispian to Surat, 
where when the London left 600/. was owing ; it is not known what 
stock is in Persia, no account having come from thence. Another 
of the generality moves that, as for the last two years no ship has 
been sent out without extraordinary charge, one be freighted ; 
to which answer is made that it is proposed to dispatch a vessel on 
a coasting voyage to Masulipatam, Bantam, Jambi, Macassar, and 
back again, and how feasible it would be to freight such a one is 
left to the generality to judge ; besides, this subject has often been 
debated by the Committees, who think that without a stock in the 
Indies it would be neither safe nor profitable. Sir Nicholas Crispe 
moves that there is no necessity to dispatch a ship, and proposes 
that a convenient number of the generality join with the Com- 
mittees to examine how the trade may be maintained. The 
Governor then puts it to the question whether a ship with a quick 
stock of 10,000/. shall be sent to Masulipatam, and by a general 
erection of hands this is assented to. A court of sales to be held 
this day fortnight. (2 pp.) 

A Court of Committees, July 31, 1640 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 246). 

John Spiller's bill amounting to ^61. iij. 4^., for disbursements 
aboard the Loudon, to be paid. Alderman Highlord and Captain 
Stiles to contract for knee timber. Leave given Spiller to go into 
the country for a fortnight. Mr. Massingbird's refusal to take out 
the silk he underwrote for is noted. Guy Bath petitions to be 
cleared and produces his account, but as the books to prove it have 
not come home he is ordered not to trouble the Company again till 
they do arrive. It is also noted that the said Guy Bath received 
part of the 800/. paid by the Dutch for interest on moneys lent 
them. Men from the Londo)i, William^ and Refonnaiion to be 
cleared, (i /.) 



72 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A General Court, August i, 1640 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 247). 

This Court is called expressly to submit to the generality a pro- 
position lately made by the Lord Mayor to the Governor and 
by him propounded to the Court of Committees, which approves 
but does not think fit to act upon it until it is confirmed by the 
generality. The said proposition is to send at once a considerable 
quantity of pepper to the Straits, or other parts, upon the Com- 
pany's account, as was done last year, in order to provide money 
more easily and cheaply to dispatch the intended ships about All- 
Hallowtide to the Coast, and in the spring to Bantam and Surat, 
as well for payment of the coral ordered, as for providing rials 
of eight, which will be procured there far cheaper than here. Two 
or three ships in the river are offered as freight ; so that, if the 
generality consents, the pepper can be shipped forthwith and be 
first in the market. Objection is made that if so much pepper 
is sent abroad it will hinder the sale of the remainder ; to which 
reply is made that such a small proportion of pepper as is intended 
cannot prejudice the Company. The Governor putting it to the 
question, assent is given by a general erection of hands. It is further 
decided to send 800 bags of pepper to Venice and Leghorn ; but 
how this quantity is to be divided, what to pay for freight of the 
ships, to whom to consign the pepper, and whether to assure all 
or part, is left to the Court of Committees to determine. (i|//-) 

A Court of Committees, August 5, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 249). 

The Governor reports the consent of the generality to pepper 
being sent to Leghorn and Venice upon the Company's account ; 
whereupon, after much debate, the order is submitted to. Though 
formerly upon like occasions the Guidanaes have been employed, 
now upon the special recommendation of several Committees the 
disposal of such part of the 800 bags of pepper as is to be sent 
to Leghorn is entrusted to Job Throgmorton and John Collier; 
and it is resolved to consign the proportion for Venice to Signors 
Laurenzo Peti, Romulo Romuli, and Paul del Sero. Messrs. 
Bodilo and Martyn, masters of ships, are treated with about freight 
of their vessels for transportation of the said pepper ; but they 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 73 

asking too much, no agreement is made, and the Deputy is entreated 
to speak with Mr. Bodilo at the Exchange and offer him 1,000 dollars 
for freight of 500 bags of pepper to Leghorn, to be laden within six 
days, and he to undertake to go direct to that port. The Lord 
Mayor reports a message he received from the Lord Treasurer and 
Lord Cottington to the effect that, as the King is not supplied with 
money as he expected, he must make use of his own, his need being 
very pressing; and there being about 15,000/. due to him from the 
Company for impost on the goods received by the Discovery, 
London^ William, and Refoj'mation, Their Lordships desire that 
4,coo/. thereof be paid either to-day or to-morrow to Sir Paul 
Pynder, who supplying His Majesty with a larger sum is to pay 
both into the Exchequer to-morrow, and the Company to pay the 
remainder of its debt as speedily as possible. The Lord Mayor and 
the Lord Treasurer's Secretary, Mr. Warwicke, who has brought 
a letter to the same effect as the message, are told that the King 
owes the Company 4,744/. for saltpetre delivered to Cordwell, the 
powdermaker (a tally having been given for 2,019/., ^^^ "° assurance 
for the remaining 2,725/.); therefore the Court desires that 4,744/. 
may be deducted from the impost, when the 4,000/. shall be 
willingly paid to Sir Paul and the remainder as soon as the ships 
are unladen and the accounts made up. Mr. Warwicke declares 
that the Lord Treasurer thinks this request reasonable and agrees 
to it ; so a warrant is ordered to be made for payment of 4,000/. 
to Sir Paul Pynder. An advance of 40/. made to Newman to enable 
him to fulfil his contract to provide staves, &c. Stevens to be paid 
38/. iSj. 6d. for oaken timber brought to Blackwall Yard by Griffin 
Kempe. A note is received from Sir Dudley Carleton, desiring the 
Committees to attend the Lords at Whitehall in the afternoon. 
Mr. Deputy's request that a friend of his may be told the price 
of the Company's calicoes, as if this is reasonable he may take the 
whole parcel, is referred for future consideration. (3 pp.) 

A Court of Committees, August 7, 1640 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 253). 

The Court resolves to have one-fourth part of the proportion 
of pipestaves, &c. mentioned in the licence procured by Newman, 
which he being content to provide, he is allowed three per cent. 



74 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

provision upon the prime cost and impost of the staves. Alderman 
Highlord and Mr. Wilson are to perfect the contract and take order 
for letters of credit to supply Newman with money for this business. 
The difference between Daniel Harvey and the Company is referred 
to Mr. Deputy and Mr. Ashwell for settlement. The Governor 
reports that when he and some Committees waited on the Lords 
at Whitehall yesterday, Lord Cottington required an account 
of the condition of the Company ; thereupon the Governor stated 
that though the returns had been good, yet because the King's 
declaration is wanting for redress of the grievances formerly pre- 
sented, the subscriptions come in slowly ; the principal discourage- 
ment is that no satisfaction is made by the Dutch, who are adding 
to their former injuries in the Indies, nor for the depredations com- 
mitted by Cobb and Ayres, nor for Mr. Courteen's voyage, nor in 
the impost and the saltpetre business. His Lordship gave several 
answers to each particular, but pressed for payment of the impost on 
the goods now returned, in order to furnish the King's occasions ; this 
the Governor and all tried to defer, but only present payment would 
serve. It is therefore resolved to make the payment, and to strike 
a tally for the money due for saltpetre and deduct it from the amount. 
Contract made with Roger Martyn to carry 800 bags of pepper to 
Leghorn and Venice on payment of 2,500 dollars for freight, 1,500 
to be paid at Leghorn upon delivery of 500 bags, and 1,000 dollars 
at Venice on delivery of the remaining 300. Certain Committees 
are entreated to perfect the charterparty draft and order the pepper 
to be shipped. (2//.) 

A Court of Committees, August 8, 1640 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 255). 

Ordered that tickets be left at the houses of those adventurers 
who have not yet taken their divisions of silk from the Warehouse, 
warning them to do so, that there may be room for the goods lately 
come home. Order regarding some rhubarb sent by Mr. Merry 
to Mr. Ashwell is referred to the next court. A gratification 
of twenty nobles given John Fredericke, a Dutchman, for eight 
months service in the Reformation-, and los. from the poor-box 
given to Elizabeth Healing, a widow. (^/.) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 75 

A Court of Committees, August 12, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 256). 

Howard Strachy (Sir John Heydon's clerk) to be paid 4/. \2s. 
for striking the tally in the Exchequer for payment of 2,019/. due 
to the Company for saltpetre sold the King and charged upon the 
Lord Mayor's account of the impositions, the said tally remaining 
still in Sir John Heydon's hands and delivery refused until it is paid. 
Mr. Spurstowe moves that the Company is much prejudiced 
by allowing sugars to be ' tared in the gunny ' instead of the buyers 
taking them ' in their shirts ' ^ ; upon which Mr. Blount is directed 
to see that the latter course be always followed. The Court under- 
standing that many who have underwritten to take out their divisions 
in silk forbear or refuse to do so, Mr. Massingberd among the 
number, the latter is asked his reasons for not acting in accordance 
with his subscription and the intent of the preamble agreed to 
at a general court ; he excuses himself at first, but on reading the 
preamble and his subscription he submits and promises to conform 
to the directions of the Court. All others who have underwritten 
in a like manner are enjoined to do the same. A list of those 
indebted to the Company is ordered to be presented monthly 
by the Treasurer, that they may be called upon for satisfaction, 
or proceeded against according to law. Cordage to be provided 
for the Reformation, The Court orders that no security once 
refused shall be again put to the ballot, and that no ballot shall be 
had unless at least thirteen Committees are present. Stevens's 
estimate for repairing the Reformation not exceeding 250/. (great 
iron bolts excepted), he is directed to put the work in hand at once 
and finish it as soon as possible. {%\ pp.) 

A Court of Sales, August 12, 1640 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 258}. 

Sale of Persian silk and stuffs, cotton yarn, sugar, sugar candy, 
dry ginger, dust of ginger, Lahore indigo, mace, and nutmegs, with 
names of purchasers and prices. (2//.) 

* The inner casing of calico in which the sugar was packed. No allowance was 
necessary for this, whereas, if the outer covering of gunny were left on as well, the 
purchaser could claim a deduction from the weight on account of the wrappings. 



76 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, August 14, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 360). 

Daniel Harvy to be allowed 60/. for want of weight in the silk 
he lately bought, this sum to be deducted from his debt to the 
Company and he to pay the remainder. Mr. Sherburne to receive 
20/. on account for disbursements for the Company. Edmond Cham- 
bers to be paid 1 2/. ^s., for taking Committees to and from Erith to 
discharge the ships lately returned. Report being made on the 
' taring ' of sugar, Mr. Blount is ordered to tare 40 bags and give 
allowance for the rest, and to get as much for the skins of the whole 
parcel as possible over and above \id. already offered. Herriott 
Washborne, George Henley, Thomas Gowers, William Tilslie, 
Thomas Culleyn, William Allyn and his son Thomas allowed by the 
balloting-box as securities for sugar. The difference between the 
Company and Mr. Langham, concerning cloves bought by him at 
the last court of sales, is referred to the next court, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees, August 15, 1640 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 262}. 

Consideration had whether to divide to the adventurers or not. 
Sambrooke, being called in to give account of the present state of 
the Company, represents that over and above all debts there is 
168,00c/., which will allow of a division of 25 per cent., leaving 
30,000/. towards interest, &c., this estimate not including the 
shipping at Blackwall nor old stores. Debate ensues as to the 
amount to be divided, and finally it is resolved to divide 25 per 
cent, in calicoes and silk without bringing in money, and no man 
to be compelled to take out ; that the indigo and pepper be sold 
to extinguish the debt, and money divided in convenient time to 
such adventurers as shall not take out goods. A General Court 
to be held next Wednesday afternoon. Sir John Nulls demands 
in writing the bargain of cloves he pretends to have bought at the 
last court of sales ; the Court disclaims all knowledge thereof. 
Mr. Browne also demands the aforesaid bargain of cloves, for, 
hearing Sir Nicholas Crispe offer ^s. per lb. for the whole parcel 
he then bid \d. more than the price set at the going out of the 
candle. Mr. Foote likewise makes demand for the said cloves, 
he having bought them for ^s. o\d. per lb. Hereupon he and 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 77 

Mr. Browne are told that three men bid the same price at one 
and the same time, and as it cannot be decided which made 
the first offer, according to custom the cloves are to be offered 
by the candle again. Mr. Langham insists again in his demand 
for the said cloves, alleging that he offered 5^. o\d. per lb. for them 
before the other men, which he can prove by many witnesses, and 
if he does not have them he will present a bill in Chancery, which 
he now desires leave of the Court to do. This is readily granted, 
but at the same time he is told that Mr, Governor and others 
are ready to take oath that they do not know who really bought 
the cloves first, and in such cases it is always customary to put 
the goods up for sale again ; neither does his pretended agree- 
ment with Foote and Browne bind the Company to perform 
the bargain. Resolved that, for prevention of a similar disorder, 
some course be devised for regulating the courts of sales at the 
next general court, that buyers may know better how to act. 
Pedro Joseph, a Venetian, sent aboard the Reformation by warrant 
from the President and Council at Bantam, is given twenty nobles 
for his services. {'i\ Pp-) 

A Court of Committees, August 19, 1640 (Cotirt Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 264). 

The porters' bill of 10/. for casing and carrying 800 bags of 
pepper, and lOi-, for ink, allowed, but their day wages stopped 
while this work is in hand. Motion made for a division of 75 per 
cent, to the adventurers and that 25 per cent, be brought in to 
extinguish the debt at interest, thus making an end of the old 
Stock ; but Mr, Governor moves * that new underwriters may come 
in for the northward for a voyage for one yeare', which would 
avoid the issuing out of much of this present Stock. Mr. Deputy 
proposes that the Company's goods be sold and its debts paid, 
its estate in town rated, as well as what has been sent to Surat 
and Bantam this year ; this to be done reasonably, so as to 
encourage the adventurers to continue, and others to buy and come 
in. After serious deliberation of these and other propositions, it 
is decided to make a division of 25 per cent,, which, according to 
the opinion of the last court, is as much as can safely be done. 
Elias Watson, Richard Hunt, and John Seed accepted by the 



78 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

balloting-box as securities for sugar candy, and Richard Ashhurst 
Richard Abbott, William Tilsly, and Thomas Gowre for sugar. {2 pp.) 

A General Court, August 19, 1640 (Cotir^ Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 265). 

The Governor makes known that this Court has been called to 
settle the dispute about the bargain of cloves set up at the last 
court of sales. After some debate it is decided by erection of 
hands that the cloves were not sold to any one, and the Governor 
reports that the Committees have thought of an order to regulate 
the Courts of Sales in future, that similar disturbances may be 
avoided. This order is read and approved, its tenor being that 
the Court resolves that, if two or more buyers (whether brethren 
of the Company or strangers) bid for a commodity at the going 
out of the candle, Mr. Governor, Mr. Deputy, and the Committees 
present shall decide who made the purchase ; but if they are unable 
to do so, then, according to the ancient custom of the Company, 
the commodity shall be again put up for sale by the candle. On 
the motion of one of the generality, it is agreed that if a Committee 
is a buyer he shall have no voice in the sale or judgement in case 
of question. The Governor proposes that a division (which has 
been seriously considered by the Committees) of 25 per cent, be 
made to the adventurers in calico at 2^ for one [sic], all divisions 
to be taken out (including those of widows and orphans), any 
remaining to be laid apart year by year until they are taken out. 
Hereupon some propose that a division of y^ per cent, be made 
and money brought in to wipe out the debt ; to whom Mr. Deputy 
replies that adventurers having paid their subscriptions are not 
obliged to bring in money; some few may, but most will not. 
The opinion of the Committees being formed from a computation 
of the state of the Company, this computation is called for and 
read, when it appears that there would remain over and above the 
25 per cent, about 39,000/. [stc], which though not enough to 
make a valuable division, yet may serve to pay interest and to set 
forth the ships now preparing for the Coast, it being necessary to 
fetch the goods from abroad, for on the last ships coming from 
Bantam there were 600 or 700 tons of pepper ready, and stock 
has been sent out to buy as much more ; therefore either the 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 79 

Company's own ships must be sent or some must be freighted. 
One of the generality observes that the Company's ships stand 
in 40/. per ton freight, but he thinks that freighted ships would be 
much less ; he is told that the Company's ships must either be 
used or sold. Thereupon Mr. Deputy offers to buy the Mary and 
freight her to the Company at 25/. per ton, the same terms on 
which the Caesar was freighted. Finally the Court rests well 
satisfied with the division of 25 per cent, proposed by the Com- 
mittees. Resolved and ordered that the indigo, silk, pepper, and 
cloves be left to the Committees to sell at such prices and in such 
manner as they think best ; a written notice to be put upon the 
Exchange to notify buyers. A court of sales to be held next 
Friday morning ; all goods that shall remain unsold to be disposed 
of by the Court of Committees. (3i//0 

A General Court of Sales, August 31, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 269). 

Sale of Legee, Ardas, Cannaree, capitone^ and defective silk, 
green ginger, lignum aloes, pepper, and cloves, with names of pur- 
chasers and prices. ' The pepper was then proposed to bee sold by 
subscripcion, 100 baggs in a parcell, none to write for more ; the 
price IS. id. sifted to transport (tyme four six months from 
Michaelmas), and 2s. 2d. per lb. garbled to sell in towne ; and noe 
sale unles all bee underwritten before Tuesday night. Onely if any 
please to underwrite for 100 or 200 baggs to sell in towne, hee 
shall have them, first come, first served. And if 2 or 300 baggs 
remayne not underwritt for, those to bee left to the Court of Com- 
mittees.' (i p.) 

'A Meeting of the Committees/ ^ August 22, 1640 {Court 
Book, vol. xvii, p. 270). 

Ordered that no adventurer have his division in calicoes until he 
has first taken out his division in silk. Mr. Bowen directed to 
write and consign 500 bags of pepper to Job Throgmorton at 
Leghorn and 300 bags to Lorenzo Pettie, Romuli Romulo, and 
Paulo del Sero at Venice, the said bags being encased and num- 

* Fr. capitott, translated by Cotgrave (1611) as ' course sleave (silke)'. 

* Those present were the Governor, the Deputy, the Lord Mayor (Sir Henry Garway) 
and Messrs. HoUovvay, Trott, Spurstow, Bhidworth, and Massmgberd. 



8o COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

bered, but as the contents of the inner bags are not noted the 
Committees think that the recipients should take off the cases and 
remit [a note of] the contents of the inner bags to the Company to 
enable Mr. Bowen to perfect the invoice. Lord Cottington, repre- 
senting the King's many and urgent occasions, especially against 
the Scotch, offers in His Majesty's name to buy all the pepper and 
underwrite for it at the Company's price and time according to the 
preamble at such security as cannot be objected to, either for the 
whole parcel or for each hundred bags ; ' adding withall His 
Majesties grace and favour to the Company to graunte their 
request for mittigacion of impost, &c., as was desired.' Mr. Governor 
replies that no answer can be given, there not being a sufficient 
number of Committees present to make a court, most of them 
being out of town till Tuesday ; but a court shall be called on 
Wednesday morning and a general court in the afternoon, without 
whose consent so great a parcel of goods cannot be disposed of ; 
that the Company is in debt for 250,000/. and the pepper was to 
be sold towards satisfaction thereof. Lord Cottington says that 
his offer is in accordance with the preamble, and his intention of 
performance so real that he himself wrote down the names of those 
to be offered as securities ; he also offers to ' acknowledge a statute 
to the Company ' ^ as a further security if any doubt is entertained. 
Mr. Governor representing the fears which the adventurers might 
have. His Lordship conceives them to be ' pannick feares ' and 
assures the Committees of the King's and his own real resolution of 
giving satisfaction according to the time and price prescribed. 
Finally, His Lordship is desired to wait until Wednesday afternoon 
is past, when he shall be told of the Company's answer ; meanwhile 
it is arranged that none of the pepper shall be underwritten for. 
Abraham Aldington to be paid 50/. on account. Ordered that two 
policies be drawn up to insure the pepper sent to Leghorn and 

1 The meaning seems to be that he offered to give a 'statute-merchant', which is 
defined in Wharton's Law Lexicon as ' a bond of record under the hand and seal of the 
debtor, authenticated by the King's seal, which renders it of so high a nature that, on 
failure of payment on the day assigned, execution may be awarded without any mesne 
process to summon the debtor, or the trouble or charges of bringing in proofs to convict 
him ... It has fallen into disuse '. No clearer proof could have been afforded of Lord 
Cottington's sincerity or of his conviction that the money would be forthcoming in due 
course. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 8i 

Venice, none to be allowed to underwrite in one alone. William 
Holmes, John Hattly, and Daniel Spencer allowed by the balloting- 
box as securities for part of Mr. Gearing's parcel of pepper. 
Mr. Young to be paid 71/. 14$-. lod. for wages at Blackwall. (a pp.) 

A Court of Committees, August 26, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 272). 

Mr. Governor reports that, accompanied by the Deputy and 
Messrs, Spurstowe and Massingbird, he waited on the Lord 
Treasurer and Lord Cottington about the proposed sale of pepper, 
when Their Lordships advised that this business be handled very 
tenderly at the general court, that so no affront be put on the 
King or the proposed securities, and that the best possible means 
be used to perfect the bargain. His Majesty having taken notice of 
it. Thereupon the Lord Mayor opines that the pepper would be 
well sold, as the security is not to be ' disliked ' and the price and 
time are of the Committees' own setting. Question is raised 
whether this bargain will not cause some of the Company's creditors 
to call in their money and so bring things to a standstill ; but it is 
answered that no one will distrust the Company for this sale, the 
security being so good. After further debate it is decided by 
erection of hands that Lord Cottington shall have the pepper on 
the security, price, and time proposed. Ordered that all brokes 
incurred for non-payment of adventures in due time shall be 
deducted from the present division of calicoes. Richard Swingle- 
hurst to be paid 661. i^s. for poldavis^ bought to case the 800 bags 
of pepper. John Gearing, Senior, John Gearing, Junior, Richard 
Allen, and Herryott Washborne allowed as securities for pepper ; 
also George Hadly, Richard Pigott and Thomas Foote. The Lord 
Mayor's motion that a policy be made to insure the Jezvel in case 
of any disaster is referred for further consideration. Richard, son 
of Richard Willis, is made free by patrimony. George Robinson, 
guardian, is questioned about some pepper missing between the 
ships and the Custom-house, and required to attend the next court 
with his partner, Thomas Dowe. (i| pp) 

' A coarse canvas, much used for sailcloth. 



82 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A General Court, August 26, 1640 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 

Mr. Governor refers to the resolution adopted at the last general 
court concerning sale of the pepper, when liberty was given to any 
to underwrite for it before last Tuesday, and reports that Lord 
Cottington came on Saturday and offered to buy it all for the King 
at the Company's price and time, offering himself, Sir Paul Finder, 
Sir Peter Wich, Sir George Rattcliffe, Sir Abraham Dawes, 
Sir John Jacob, Sir Job Harby, Sir Nicholas Crispe, Sir John 
Nulls, James Maxwell, and John Harrison as securities, and after 
reading the preamble offered to underwrite for the pepper, but there 
not being a full court His Lordship was entreated to wait until the 
consent of the generality had been obtained, for which purpose this 
court is called. The Governor further relates that this proposal 
has been considered by the Committees, who think it would be no 
prejudice to the Company thus to sell the pepper, none having 
underwritten for it in the specified 'time, and had it remained 
another week it would have abated in price. The Governor, the 
Deputy, and others had been sent for by the Lord Treasurer and 
Lord Cottington and requested not to let any affront be put upon 
the King or His Lordship in this matter. One of the generality 
remarks that though merchants may now buy pepper cheaper than 
from the Company (as in Mr. Burlymakye's case), and though he 
would trust the proffered securities for more than the value of the 
pepper, yet he thinks that if the Company may not have a free sale 
of its own goods it will be ruined. Another declares that at the 
last court it was resolved to sell the pepper by 100 bags, for which 
he intended to have underwritten, but hearing Lord Cottington's 
proposal he refrained. To this it is answered that now it will not 
be safe to do anything but accept the proposed treaty, it being 
thought that this service will give good satisfaction to the King 
and be a means of causing him to grant the Company favours in 
those particulars formerly presented ; that if any stranger had made 
the same offer it would have been accepted, and therefore it cannot 
be worse for the Company because the King has the bargain. It is 
suggested that the question be put to the balloting-box, but this is 
in a manner forbidden, it being distasteful to the Lords. Then 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 83 

a proposal is made to leave it to the Committees to decide ; but 
they think the generality had better do so. Hereupon motion is 
made that the necessity of the King's affairs has caused this pro- 
position and that the danger with which the State is threatened 
requires money, and as this will be an acceptable service causing 
no danger or prejudice it will be well to accept it, the Company 
never having been known to refuse the best price. Mr. Governor 
also advises that it be accepted without being put to the vote, at 
the same time acknowledging that he felt fearful at first but on 
better consideration is no longer so. All those not free of the 
Company are desired to depart ; and then the bargain with Lord 
Cottington for the whole parcel of pepper is assented to and con- 
firmed. (2I //.) 

A Court of Committees, August 28, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 27^)' 

The order formerly made, that no warrants for divisions be 
delivered to those who have not cleared their brokes or to those 
who are indebted longer than is usual for goods bought of the 
Company, is confirmed. Mr. Smithwick's desire to have a copy of 
the list of sorts and prices of calicoes to be divided is refused. Four 
bonds for payment for the pepper at four intervals of six months, 
14,000/. at each payment, having been read and allowed, the Court 
resolves that all these must be sealed by the securities before the 
pepper is delivered. A note is also to be written to Lord Cottington 
to remind him of the Company's request, lately made to him at the 
Lord Mayor's, to move the King for a Privy Seal to license all free 
brethren to export East India commodities, ah'eady imported or 
to be imported, after one year, the impost to be returned as formerly ; 
also that the Company may have six and six months for payment of 
impost upon all East India goods in future imported. Letter read 
from Job Throgmorton, intimating want of money to buy the coral 
and that the exchange is high ; resolved to advise him to take up 
money at interest for three months or less until arrival of the pepper. 
Wages due at Rlackwall, amounting to 6^1. 13^-., to be paid. Several 
parcels of indigo, private trade, having been bought by Mr. Young 
at 4 J", and 4^'. dd. per lb., his authority for so doing is asked, when 
he replies that he acted on the instructions of some Committees; 

G 3 



84 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

the proprietors of the indigo are desired to attend the court. Ordered 
that a long boat and a skiff be made for the Reformation and for 
the Mary; and that John Hawkins, boatmaker, be paid i8jr. for 
knee timber bought from him by Stevens. {% pp.) 

Warrant to Sir Nicholas Crispe and Sir John Nulles, 
August, 1640 {Public Record Office: Doni. Chas. /, vol. cccclxv, 
No. 64). 

To buy 120,000/. worth of pepper, cloves, and other commodities 
from the East India Company, to whom the new contracted Farmers 
shall be security ; and to sell the same, with the approbation of 
the Lord Treasurer and Chancellor of the Exchequer, for ready 
money, to supply the King's want of an immediate supply ; any 
loss to be borne by the King, and they to be legally discharged from 
it as their counsel shall advise ; and, their employment herein being 
solely for His Majesty's service, he will keep them harmless from 
prejudice to themselves or their estate, (ij pp.) 

A Court of Committees, September 2, 1640 [Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 278). 

Mr. Smithwick's account is referred to Messrs. Bludworth, Mas- 
singbird, and Sambrooke. Boatswain Ingram moves that the 
cables in the ships lately returned be viewed to see if any are 
serviceable, and that a master be chosen for the Reformation, who 
could do this and oversee the ordering of stores and provisions for 
that ship. The names of Messrs. Prowd, Bailey, Allison, Birkdale, 
and Gardiner are mentioned for this post, and Mr. Prowd is desired 
to view and report on the cables and consider whether he will 
undertake the command of the Reformation if called upon. Boat- 
swain Ingram's account for boat-hire &c., amounting to 4/. os. \d., 
to be paid. Stevens is directed to buy 400/. worth of oaken timber 
to repair the Mary. The proposition of Sir Nicholas Crispe, pre- 
sented by Mr. Blunt, to pay for goods he lately bought, amounting 
to 12,000/., out of the subsidies of the goods brought home in the 
four last ships, is accepted. Abraham Aldington having received 
50/., the 57/. 12s. lod. remaining on account is ordered to be paid 
him, he giving a general release, and being content to disclaim his 
difference in account of 400 rials of eight of which there is no 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 85 

account given in the Surat books ; Mr. Bretton's account is to 
be charged with this sum until he brings it to the Company's 
account. Richard Piggott, George Hadly, Thomas Foote, John 
Gearing, Senior, John Gearing, Junior, and Richard Allen allowed 
by the balloting-box as securities for cloves. Consideration had 
of the disposal of goods remaining unsold ; it is proposed to divide 
in silk and indigo, which comes to 120,000/., 20 per cent, upon 
stock and 10 per cent, more, this 10 per cent, to be brought in 
(in ready money) towards extinguishing the debt. The 10 per 
cent, will amount to about 30,000/. or 40,000/., and the remainder 
of the debt may be paid from money due to the Company for 
goods, and by its estate abroad ; and if there is any doubt, then 
a policy to be drawn for 100,000/. upon the estate abroad at two 
per cent. After some debate the Court affirms the desirability 
of dividing 30 per cent, (namely, 20 upon stock and 10 per cent, 
to bring in money) in silk and indigo, the silk at 20i-. and the 
indigo at i^s. per lb., the 10 per cent, to be paid in upon discount 
at five six months' time from next Michaelmas. It is thought 
necessary that a ship be dispatched to Surat this year, and that 
15,000/. will be sufficient, with what remains abroad, to relade her 
home. Some remission of freight on drugs and calicoes allowed 
Mr. Gilson, late master of the London, who is dangerously ill. 
Ordered that a policy be drawn to insure the Jewel for 20,000/. 
without account at six per cent., her lading being valued at 30,000/. 
(2I/A) 

A Court of Committees, September 5, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 281). 

The Court resolving to dispatch the Refonnatioji by the end 
of this or the middle of next month, ninety men are to be sent 
in her and she to be victualled for fifteen months. The Mary 
going out in the spring will probably carry a supply of men for the 
ships abroad, as she will arrive at Bantam before the Reformation, 
the latter ship being designed for the Coast first. Edmund Ellis, 
an old man, petitioning for work, Mr. Fotherby is directed to find 
him employment. Wages at Blackwall for the past week, amount- 
ing to 79/. ds., ordered to be paid. The thanksgiving service, 
which was put off on account of Mr. Shute's sickness, is to be held 



86 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

(he being now recovered) next Thursday at four o'clock in the 
afternoon at the parish church of St. Andrew Undershaft. 
Mr. Smithwick insisting on his demand for 120/. for * Paules money ' 
and praying that his brokes may be reckoned at 8 per cent, he 
is told that the interest on ' Paules money ' is not due to him, 
it having been lent to the Company at six per cent, to free the 
900/, from brokes ; that his brokes cannot be reduced lower than 
18 per cent, according to the preamble without authority from the 
General Court, and that this Court considers that if after eight years 
they are reduced to 8 per cent, it will be a great loss to the 
Company, and this will be put to the General Court. Warrant for 
300/. to be made out to Mr. Craddock to buy dyed and dressed 
cloths, he to pay from 10/. los. to 16/. the cloth. Remission 
of freight on goods allowed Mr. Prowd. Mr. Stevenson moving 
for payment of 155/. iSs. for wharfage, &c., which has been owing 
two years, the Court orders the books to be searched to ascertain 
why it has not been paid before. (i|//.) 

A Court of Committees, September 9, 1640 (Conj-t Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 283). 

Charles Deane, an almsman at Blackwall, is given 40^-. for 
reading prayers to the other almsmen for the space of ten years. 
This being the day appointed for election of a master for the 
Reformation, Messrs. Baily, Allison, Gardiner, and Birkdale are 
severally called in, and Baily is chosen at a salary of 8/. per month. 
The Husband is directed to procure a certificate from the Custom- 
house for impost on the pepper sent to Leghorn and Venice before 
Michaelmas, as after that time it cannot be allowed upon this year's 
account. Mr. Cappur, in the absence of Mr. Sherburne, is also 
directed to see that a tally be struck for the saltpetre sold to the 
King. Mr. Governor reminds the Court of a former proposition 
that a division be made in silk and indigo, referred to this court. 
The Lord Mayor thinks it would be dangerous, for, the goods once 
gone from the warehouse, many will be ready to call in their 
money at interest and thus bring the credit of the Company 
to a stand. Mr. Sambrooke reads an account of the present state 
of affairs, by which it appears that there is 34,000/, at home, over 
and above the payment of the Company's debt, towards the said 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 87 

division and dispatch of ships this year to the Coast, and to the 
northwards and southwards, while the division would amount to 
above 80,000/. Hereupon some propose an assurance of 100,000/. ; 
but the Lord Mayor replies that an assurance is ' but a shadowe * ; 
that in case of casualty or no casualty, the money to pay the 
Company's debt will not be obtained in three years, and that if 
the ten per cent, were paid in it would only come to 40,000/., and 
it is very doubtful whether half even would come in ; so that if the 
division proceeds and the goods are divided, it will * at one blowe 
breake the neck of the trade by overthrowing the creditt of the 
Company'. After further argument, the Governor also thinking 
that to divide might bring dangerous consequences, it is put to the 
question and agreed that it will not be safe to divide at present. 
Consideration is had how to bring in money ; and it is thought 
that as rich indigo is very scarce the flat will go off more readily 
and 500 barrels sell before Michaelmas. The Court sets the price 
of the flat indigo for transportation at 5^. per lb. at four six months 
with good security, and orders a book to be set out for any to 
underwrite for it ; but resolution herein is deferred. Abraham 
Chamberleyne, Senior, and Abraham Chamberleyne, Junior, allowed 
by the balloting-box as security for defective silk ; also William 
Pennoyer and John Garway for capitone silk. {p-\pp) 

A Court of Committees, September ii, \6\o {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 286). 

Mr. Massingbird presents a paper showing the debts owing 
by and to the Company, by which it appears that, besides what 
cash remains, upwards of 30,000/, will be wanted to meet necessary 
and pressing disbursements ; he recommends the Court to consider 
this and resolve, so that a supply may be made for satisfaction 
of such debts as are called for, that the credit and reputation of the 
Company may be maintained and the necessary money issued for 
dispatch of the Reformation to the Coast and of the Mary in the 
spring. In his opinion the only way to do this is by selling the 
goods remaining on hand, for, though they may not yield as much 
now as at other times, yet the Company's urgent need would make 
it much more profitable to dispose of them by sale or division now 
than to let them remain unsold. Debate ensues ; when it is 



88 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

proposed that the Committees should take up money at interest 
as upon Hke occasions they have done before, or that such of them 
as have any considerable sum of money lying by should lend 
it to the Company. Hereupon one Committee ofifers to send 
in 1,000/. if the others will do likewise. Another proposal is made 
that all the goods be divided, those taking them out to be enjoined 
to bring in half money and give security for the remainder at 
a certain time ; or that a book be set out for any to underwrite 
for silk at 203. per lb. and indigo at ^s. per lb. at five six months. 
An offer is also made for all the silk at 16s. per lb,, 10,000/. to 
be paid before Michaelmas and the remainder within two months ; 
but after further argument as to how to raise the money resolution 
herein is deferred. Alderman Gayre is elected a Committee for 
the warehouse in place of Alderman Abdy, deceased. A bill 
of wages at Blackwall, amounting to 72/. 17^., ordered to be paid. 
(I pp.) 

A Court of Committees, September 16, 1640 {Co7irt Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 288). 

Mr. Massingbird reports that he has received the tally from the 
Exchequer for 2,723/. owing for saltpetre supplied to the King, as 
well as satisfaction from the Lord Mayor for 1,818/. due for impost 
on the pepper lately sent to Leghorn and Venice. Ordered that 
the 3,000/. owing to the late Alderman Abdy, and by him designed 
to be paid to Lord Cottington in part of the bargain of pepper 
bought of His Lordship, be paid ; Mr. Vivian, one of the deceased 
Alderman's overseers, is sent for and told that the money awaits 
his demand. Three hundred broadcloths to be bought for dispatch 
to India this year ; and the Committees entrusted with the purchase 
are entreated to have them dyed and dressed while the weather 
is fair. Mr. Cordwell comes, at the direction of the Lord Treasurer 
and Lord Cottington, to ascertain the quantity and price of the 
saltpetre remaining in the Company's hands. Their Lordships 
intending to buy it for the King's service as formerly ; he is told 
that there are about fifty tons at 4/. 10s. per hundred at six months, 
on condition that all is taken and a tally struck upon collection 
of the impost. Mr. Vandepitt demanding the freedom of the 
Company for his son, the Court defers answering his request until 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 89 

the charter granting freedom to ' straingers ' has been looked into. 
Abraham Chamberleyne, Junior, joint executor with his mother-in- 
law, Mrs. Askwith, requests payment of the dividends owing to his 
late father-in-law, Mr. Askwith ; but Mrs. Askwith having two 
years ago desired that the said dividends should not be paid 
without her concurrence, the request is refused until her consent 
is obtained. Certain Committees are desired to read the general 
letters and abstract the principal points concerning the present 
affairs of the Company for the Court to consider. Treasurer 
Bateman is directed to pay a bill of exchange for 100/. drawn by 
William Newman in Ireland. (2//.) 

A Court of Committees, September 18, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 290). 

Mr. Governor reports that the Committees met yesterday to 
consider what stock and shipping are needed in the Indies, when 
Messrs. Markham, Sambrooke, and Pinson were directed to make 
a computation of the Company's estate abroad ; and this having 
been done, it appears that there is a stock of 75,000/. to the south- 
wards, after the James, Caesar, and Stvan are laden for Europe, 
which will require 2,000 tons of shipping to bring home. It is 
decided to send the Mary, William, and London, the Company's 
own ships, as the cost of setting them out for so short a voyage 
will be but small. Consideration had of the trade of Surat. It is 
observed that the cloth from there and Masulipatam forms the basis 
of all trade to the southwards, from whence two or three hundred 
tons of pepper may be sent yearly to Surat to ship with the bale 
goods for Europe. The Court conceives it necessary to send 
shipping and stock to Surat this year, which must either be done 
by the old Company or be left to new undertakers. Mr. Methwold 
thinks that it will be better to send two ships to Surat, a small 
vessel of about 200 tons to be dispeeded early in the year with 
stock, with advices to the factors to provide lading for a larger ship 
to follow ; this small ship might be laden home the same year, thus 
making her voyage about eighteen months. He is confident that 
the Crispian cannot bring home all the stock remaining at Surat ; 
so the larger ship might remain one year and make two voyages 
to Persia upon freight, carrying Surat goods for the Company, 



90 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

which in Persia will yield forty or fifty per cent, profit. The small 
ship might voyage to the Red Sea, not only to secure the Com- 
pany's trade from pirates but to gain a good freight, and return 
laden to Europe in thirty months. This proposal is well approved 
and Mr. Methwold is desired to set it down in writing by the next 
court, that, being resolved on, advice may be sent by the Reforma- 
tion to the Coast and thence by pattamar in twenty days to Surat. 
The Court considers that 50,000/, quick stock will be sufficient 
to lade the said two ships, A general court appointed to be held 
next Wednesday afternoon. Mr, Pinson, who has served the 
Company fourteen and a half years and has now been home nearly 
three months, desires that his account may be cleared ; and 
Mr. Hunter making a similar request, both accounts are ordered 
to be made up. Mr, Craddock to be paid 500/. for cloths, 
Mr. Steevenson, the wharfinger, renews his request for payment 
of 155^' i8-^- due upon his account ; but the Court, remembering 
the great damage sustained by the wetting of goods in a lighter 
at the Custom-house quay, calls for the books, and reading an order 
of the 13th July, 1638, refers this business (as was then done) to 
arbitration. Thereupon Steevenson nominates Richard Wakeman, 
and asks the Committees to nominate some one not free of the 
Company, George Warner, Captain Samuel Carleton, and 
Mrs, Rebecca Carleton accepted by the balloting-box as securities 
for indigo. Steevens conferred with about preparing the three 
ships for the southwards, and Boatswain Ingram ordered to bring 
the William to Blackwall, Edward Steevens to be paid 30/, for 
one quarter's salary. The week's wages at Blackwall, amounting 
to 134/, 14J,, to be paid, Mr, Mason to be given 5/. for himself, 
the sexton and the poor, and \os. for Mr. Mezy. {'^pp) 

A Court of Committees, September 33, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol, xvii, p, 293), 

Mr. Cox renews his request that his differences with the Company 
may be settled ; he is told that it is his own fault that this was not 
done long ago ; whereupon he alleges that the business had been 
referred to Sir Paul Pinder and Mr. Lawrence Halstead for his 
part, and to Sir Henry Garway and Alderman Abdy on behalf 
of the Company, and he produces a paper which he pretends is an 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 91 

agreement of three of the referees. The Lord Mayor denies that 
any agreement was written down, but acknowledges that some 
thought that Hobbs should be allowed his wages of 100/. for the 
two and a half years he lived. Mr. Cox confesses that his man 
wrote the paper. He demands his division upon 800/., declaring 
he will adventure no more. He is told that both this and the 
General Court think it right that he be held to his subscription, 
and that he must conform to it accordingly. He refuses to do so, 
and leaves the court. Mr. Methwold presents a written digest of his 
opinion for the more profitable ordering of the trade, which is well 
approved by the Court, but it is observed that the opinion of the 
General Court herein must be ascertained. The general condition 
of affairs both to the northwards and southwards is represented 
by Mr. Governor, and there being no expectation of a stock to be 
underwritten for this year, it is thought necessary that the voyage 
to Surat be undertaken by the old adventurers, and that the Mary, 
London, and William are fit to be sent to Bantam to fetch the 
goods remaining there, not to wait for each other, but to set out 
as soon as ready. The Company's means to defray this charge 
is next considered, the present debt amounting to 360,000/., and 
some think this undertaking may cause the said debts to remain 
longer upon interest unpaid. Motion is made that factors and all be 
fetched home, but it is questioned whether this would be permitted, 
and if so whether it would tend to anything but the ruin and dis- 
honour of the Company and of the whole nation, for the Dutch 
would immediately step in and exclude the English. Even if the 
present Company deserts the trade, it must not ruin it for others, 
who will undoubtedly take it up, as, though now the times are un- 
certain yet by God's blessing they will mend, and the trade being 
very advantageous to the kingdom must not be abandoned un- 
advisedly, seeing that good conditions for its support may be 
expected from the King and State, as a well-wisher has lately 
reported. It being considered that about 50,000/. will set out the 
three ships, which will increase the debt to 20,000/, more than there 
is in the kingdom, after serious debate it is resolved to dispeed the 
said ships to Bantam to fetch the goods ; and seeing that it will be 
time enough a month hence to decide about Surat, it is resolved 
to propose that a stock of 25,000/. be provided for the northwards 



92 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

and a ship and pinnace sent to fetch goods from Surat. If the 
present adventurers do not approve this, they can leave it to new 
undertakers, who will start on better terms, having advice before- 
hand, factories settled, and shipping ready repaired with provisions 
for the voyage. Resolved that the Reformation shall discharge her 
lading at the Coast and then proceed to Bantam to be disposed 
of as required. Mr. Baily thinks she will be ready within a month 
or six weeks. Messrs. Holloway and Spurstowe are entreated 
to buy 200 pigs of lead for her kentledge ; and Wednesday next 
is appointed for election of her purser and officers. Moved that 
each Committee shall lend money upon interest, for every 1,000/. 
adventure 100/., in order to raise money. (3 pp.) 

A General Court, September 23, 1640 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 296). 

Mr. Governor represents that this Court has been called to 
consider what stock and shipping it will be necessary to send out 
this year. The condition of the Company has been considered, 
and a computation of the stock to the southwards has been made, 
by which it appears that 75^00/. remains there, which will produce 
1,800 tons of goods to be fetched home. Mr. Pinson reports that 
when he came from Bantam there were 700 tons of pepper there, 
while a like quantity was expected from Jambi, and 300 tons from 
Banjarmassin, besides the Jezvels lading; all which will require 
2,000 tons of shipping to bring home. The Committees think that 
the Mary, William, and London should be sent to Bantam, and 
that the Discovery might afterwards go to Surat, which can be con- 
sidered later on. Meanwhile there is great cause to be thankful 
to God for the amount of goods abroad ; and they, having promised 
not to send out ships or stock without consent of the generality, 
now await their decision. It being asked if any stock is to be sent 
in the said ships, and whether the factors now abroad are to be 
recalled, reply is made that it will be fitting to send some stock 
to defray charges and pay customs, etc., while as regards the factors 
there is six months' time to consider, though it is probable that 
whosoever shall undertake the trade in the future will employ them. 
Some think that all will consent to send out ships and stock at an 
inclusive charge of 45,000/. to 50,000/., as it is absolutely necessary 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 93 

to send a ship and pinnace to Surat, one ship not being sufficient 
to fetch 400 bales of silk and the investment of 40,000/. ; while 
others consider that 25,000/. would be sufficient to send for stock. 
Proposal made that a committee of the generality join with the 
standing committee to consider these points ; also that, seeing the 
goods are ready, ships be freighted to fetch them home. This 
latter proposal is objected to as being ' neither safe nor yett good 
husbandry, the Company having three such shipps of their owne 
as the like for merchants are not in the kingdome '. Objection 
is raised that the 45,000/. or 50,000/. with interest will come to 
more than the 75,000/. to be fetched home, and would supply 
lading for as many more ships ; that if the three ships were sold 
they would fetch 6,000/. or 7,000/., which if invested would bring 
in 20,000/. Against ships being freighted it is further argued that 
on return of the Company's own three ships their provisions and 
stores will be worth 8,000/. or 10,000/. ; other ships cannot readily 
be found ; private trade, so obnoxious to the Company, will be 
much more prejudicial in freighted vessels, and such ships will 
be undervalued in victuals, men, and all sorts of provisions, and 
so will not relieve one another, besides the uncertainty of demurrage. 
The Company does not refuse altogether to freight ships, for there 
may be occasion to do so both to the northwards and to the south- 
wards, and any offering ships of 400 or 500 tons will be listened to. 
After further dispute it is proposed that this business be deferred 
for a fortnight to see if any will tender ships. Finally, it is ordered 
by erection of hands that the Company's ships be employed, and 
in case of need that some stock be carried, but to relade sparingly 
and not send more stock than is necessary, and not to continue 
or enlarge the trade upon this Third Joint Stock ; for if the Com- 
pany resolves not to continue the trade, then it will be fit to give 
way to those who will. Mr. Governor reports that Mr. Methwold 
has drawn up his opinion concerning trade to the northwards, and 
conceives that 25,000/. will be sufficient stock for a future year's 
investment ; this opinion shall be road hereafter when time permits. 
Mr. Smithvvick's petition that his brokes may be reduced to eight 
per cent., as Mr. Milward's were, is granted. (3 pp.) 



94 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, September 25, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 299). 

It is resolved to send the Discovery in place of the VVilliatn, 
which has not yet been brought into dock and will require longer 
time for trimming and fitting than was thought. On information 
that some are endeavouring to conceal the estate remaining in the 
Company's hands of Richard [William in margin'\ Piggott, who 
died at Bantam, certain Committees are desired to report concern- 
ing this business. Mr. Methwold appointed to join with Mr. Spur- 
stow in viewing the chirurgions' chests, Mr. Cooke, apothecary, and 
Mr. Boone, chirurgion, to assist, and the surgeons appointed for the 
voyage to be present when the chests are viewed. Resolved, 
according to the order of the General Court, to send ten thousand 
rials of eight in the Reformation for the Coast, and Mr. Treasurer 
and Mr. Massingbird are desired speedily to provide the same. 
Messrs. Cokayne and Cradock accepted as security for indigo. 
Cordage and tempered stuff for trimming the ships in the Indies 
to be provided. The Court resolves that any one giving ^s. 4d. 
per lb. for the 300 barrels of indigo shall be allowed to sell and 
dispose of it, on condition that those taking ten barrels have it at 
six and six months, those taking thirty and more at three six 
months' time. Mr. Deputy acquaints the Court that some who 
do not wish their names known offer to buy privately all the Com- 
pany's silk ; he therefore proposes that any one offering the Ware- 
house Committee a considerable price, namely 16^. gd. for the 
Legee and i6s. ^d. for the Ardas and Cannary silk, may be con- 
tracted with. This is generally approved ; but as some think that 
the sole power to sell should not be allowed the Warehouse Com- 
mittee, it is agreed that to it shall be added six other Committees ; 
and that in the event of an offer being made for the whole parcel 
at the aforesaid prices, the Committee thus enlarged shall have 
power to contract for the silk to be sold for transportation. The 
accounts of John Allison, master's mate in the Discovery, Gilbert 
Gardiner, master's mate in the William, and James Birkdale, 
master's mate in the London^ to be cleared and their wages paid, 
they delivering to Mr. Bowen their large journals kept in their late 
voyages. Mr. Hunter's relation of the Company's affairs in India 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 95 

is to be read at the next court. The complaints against Mr. Pinson 
in the Black Book or general letters are to be collected and put 
before the court, that he may either be proceeded against or 
acquitted. Two months' pay of the wages of Walter Clarke, 
master of the Michael, granted to his wife. James Man chosen 
to act as arbitrator for the Company in the affairs of Mr. Steeven- 
son, who for his part has nominated Richard Wakeman to settle 
the differences at issue, which if they cannot do then they are 
to appoint an umpire. Mr. Younge to be given 75/. \^s. \d. to pay 
a week's wages at Blackwall, 20/. to bring the William from Erith 
to the Blackwall dock, and 50/. to clear debts remaining for the 
four ships returned last from India. Boatswain Ingram chosen 
to supply the place of William Swanly, who has given up the 
Company's service. {'^\PP) 

A Court of Committees, October 3, 1640 (Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 303). 

Mr. Sherburne is to apply to Lord Cottington to command the 
Officers of the Navy to lend the Company 10,000 pipestaves, for 
which the Company will give ready money or repay in kind upon 
return of those expected from Ireland. Stephen Burton offers 
5^. per lb. for the whole parcel of indigo, at five six months from 
next November, on condition to rebate 20,000/. before the end of 
the said month, or if he bring in 500/. or 1,000/. before that time, 
that it be accepted upon rebate at the rate of eight per cent., with 
an allowance of two months, as is usual upon bills ; the Court 
agreeing, this contract is entered and firmed by Mr. Burton. 
Edward Abbott and Mr. Fortree offering two ships to freight for 
the Indies on the same terms as Captain Jourdayne was given for 
the Caesar, the Court resolves to debate and return them an answer 
next Friday. Upon the request of Mr. Pinson 200/. is imprested 
unto him on account ; and 200/. ordered to be paid Mr. Francklyn 
for broadcloths to be sent to India this year. John Smith, late 
purser's mate in the Discovery, chosen purser of the Rcfonnation, 
William Mynn, purser's mate, and Thomas Peate, steward. 
Thomas Maulthus chosen purser of the next ship for Bantam. 



g6 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, October 7, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 305). 

Mr. Potter demanding a remainder due (as he pretends) to 
Mr. Skibbow's account, he is told that the Court has already- 
cleared with him, when general releases were exchanged, as 
appears by an order of the ist of June, 1638, and these releases 
the Court intends to insist upon. Mr. Mun's report comparing 
the employment of the Company's own ships with freighted ships 
is read and all charges duly represented observed, by which it 
appears that the Company's ships may be set out at less cost, 
according to the proportion of tonnage ; for the Mary, being 
one-third larger than the Caesar (a freighted ship), stands in 638/. 
per month, whereas the latter vessel stands in 600/. per month. 
Debate ensues upon this, and the many inconveniences which may- 
happen by freighted ships, some thinking Mr. Mun's report unan- 
swerable, while others are not satisfied. It is therefore proposed to 
appoint a day for examination of this business, when those in 
favour of freighted ships may give their reasons. Two proxies are 
ordered to be sealed, one for David Budd to be proctor for the 
Company in the suit between it and Monsieur Regemont, the other 
for John Cappur to show that the Company have cause for action 
against him to the value of 30,000/., the action in the Admiralty 
being entered at 50,000/. A petition read from John Francklyn, 
imprisoned in the Fleet for exhibiting a scandalous bill in the Star 
Chamber against Sir Morris Abbott and some of the Company's 
servants, wherein he prays to be released without paying the costs 
spent by the Company in that suit ; this is denied. Mr. Mun 
reports that eighteen pieces of sallampores sent from the Indies by 
Thomas Merryell to his mother, being marked T. M. were thought 
to belong to him (Mun) and in his absence were left at a neighbour's 
house, but they have since been claimed by Merryell's mother ; 
the Court resolves that the said goods be brought to the Company's 
house and disposed of as is thought fit. Resolved that the crew of 
the William be reduced from 140 to 1 20, that of the Mary from 
150 to 130, and that of the Discovery from 100 to 90; the men 
thus left behind to be appointed to other ships if they are wanted. 
A bill of William Mynors, of 5/. ^s. M. for supplying Monsieur 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 97 

Regiment with clothes and other necessaries on his homeward 
voyage, is ordered to be paid. (2 //.) 

A Court of Committees, October 9, 1640 {Cottrt Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 307). 

Ordered that the sallampores be delivered to the mother of 
Thomas Merryell, the freight charged to his account, and he to be 
questioned on his return for sending home the Company's goods. 
Pork and beef to be provided for fifteen instead of for twenty 
months as formerly, both for the northwards and southwards, the 
voyages being now of shorter duration. The Committees report- 
ing that the chirurgions' chests from Bantam and Surat have been 
examined and nothing worthy the trouble and charge found in 
them, Messrs. Spurstow and Methwold are desired to provide 
a chirurgion's chest for the Reformation; also one for Bantam. 
Ordered that a butt of wine be sent in the Refortnation to the 
factories on the Coast, and that the proportion of wine for the 
ship's allowance be reduced to six or eight months' provision, 
it having formerly been too large. Messrs. Abbott and Fortree, 
who offered two ships to the Company for freighting, are told that 
this year the Company has resolved to freight its own ships. The 
William having been brought into dock, John Hartland is ordered 
to take down the keys, that her hold may be opened and the 
ballast taken out ; he is required to be present with Mr. Fotherby 
and Boatswain Ingham to see what pepper, iron crows, and wood 
are found, for though the wood may not serve for the sea again it 
will do for the pitch kettle. Thomas Skynner, desiring to receive 
100/. upon the account of Mr. Merry, is told that if at Merry's 
departure there was an agreement to pay the said sum, or if that 
payment has since been ordered, it shall be allowed. Mr. Smith- 
wick moves to be allowed 8 per cent, for ' Paules money ', in all 
30/., which he himself allowed the Company ; the Court at first 
demurs, remembering that the money was lent at 6 per cent., but 
Smithwick openly avowing his present necessity, by general consent 
the 30/. is given to him. He then demands the warrant for his 
division in calicoes and that some of his brokes, which amount to 
28/,, upon the next division may be reduced ; but this is refused. 
Thereupon he desires permission to sell by the candle loc/. of his 



98 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

adventure, three divisions being taken out and 25/. remaining ; this 
being set up for sale is bought by John Massingbird at the going 
out of the candle for 27/. los. The last week's wages at Blackwall, 
amounting to 115/. us. gd., to be paid. {i\pp-) 

Accounts of the Lord Treasurer, October 9, 1640 
{Public Record Office: Dom. Chas. /, vol. cccclxix, No. 72). 

For the weeks ending August 28, September 4, 18, 28, and 
October 9, 1640, specifying the sums received from various sources, 
including the loan and sale of pepper, and the amounts paid out 
and to whom. (2//'.) 

A Court of Committees, October 14, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 309). 

Discussion resumed concerning the difference of charge in freight- 
ing ships or sending out those belonging to the Company. The- 
latter course, according to Mr. Mun's computation, appears the 
more profitable ; but for the better satisfaction of the Court a par- 
ticular inquiry is ordered to be made and certain Committees are 
desired to examine Mun's computation, with the charge of three or 
four more of the Company's ships that have made the shortest re- 
turns. At the importunity of many of the Company's servants who 
brought home in the Discovery and London as private trade calicoes 
and indigo, both which are prohibited, delivery of the said goods is 
ordered on the proprietors paying i id. per lb. for the indigo and 
IS. 6d. per book for the calicoes. Dr. Reeve, the King's Advocate, 
importunes for payment of the wages of his kinsman, Guy Bath, 
asserting that though there are some charges against him, yet his 
accusers, who sent him home as a delinquent, did not send their 
accusations as they should have done. In reply, the Court tells the 
Doctor of the great disservice done by Bath, especially in joining with 
the late Agent, William Gibson, in lending 4,000 ' tomands ' (equal 
to 15,000/. sterling) from the Company's cash to the Dutch, by which 
means the latter were enabled to supply themselves with silk from 
Persia, thus preventing the Company from having it, and causing 
a shortage of so much cash for a long time, which was very preju- 
dicial. For these and other reasons given. Dr. Reeve is entreated 
not to press for money now, but to await the arrival of the accounts. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 99 

when the truth will appear ; and his request to have this business 
referred to two or three Committees is refused. The Treasurer to 
provide money for beef and pork for this year's ships. Order of the 
Lords ^ to supply the Company with 10,000 pipestaves from the 
King's naval stores read, and the Husband directed to receive them 
from Mr. Crane, Victualler of the Navy. The account of John 
Milward, deceased at Bantam, to be cleared, and the jewels chal- 
lenged by the executors and mentioned in the account to be de- 
livered, except the diamond, which is to be detained till further 
order. Thomas Smithwick, Senior, puts up for sale by the candle 
200^. of his adventure in the Third Joint Stock, three divisions 
being taken out, 35/. [per cent. ?] remaining, which he offers for 
30/. ; it is bought by Mr. Deputy for ^^l. On the authority of a 
letter dated June 10, 1639, from Thomas Merry, factor at Spahan, 
payment is ordered of 100/., two-thirds of his last year's wages, to 
Thomas Skynner, Secretary to the Merchants Adventurers. The 
Earl Marshal desiring that Mark Muffett may be entertained in the 
Company's service^ he is informed that the Company is drawing 
home its estate and does not intend to send out any factors, or 
favour should have been shown Muffett for His Lordship's sake. 
Resolved that 20,000/. in money, about 13,000/. in stock, and twenty 
cloths be sent in the Reformation^ with advice to the Coast what 
stock and ships are to be dispeeded for Surat, that lading may be 
prepared beforehand. Imprest to be paid the Reformation s com- 
pany, she being ready to proceed to Gravesend. {A pp.) 

A Court of Committees, October 16, 1640 (Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 313). 

The want of ordnance for small ships being noted in the letters 
from Surat, the Husband is ordered to examine the Company's store 
to see what there is fit to be sent to that place. There being also 
a lack of provisions for the ships in India noted in the Company's 
letters, it is resolved to consider this and the condition of the ships 
to the southwards at the next meeting. Mr. Prowd is questioned 
about the vacant space in the hatchway in the Reformation observed 
by the Commitees who went down to see her break bulk, and by 
them thought to have been reserved for private trade. Mr. Prowd 

^ See the Privy Council Registers, under date of October 9, 1640. 
li 2 



TOO COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

declares that when the ship left Bantam it was decided not to fill this 
vacant space with pepper ' because the shipp wold have bin soe wait 
shee wold not have borne sayle ' ; it was therefore filled with water 
cask and other necessary provisions, which being used during the 
voyage the space was empty at the ship's arrival. The Court, giving 
credit to this explanation, and observing that Prowd had behaved 
well and is an able seaman, appoints him master of the William, 
and for his further encouragement decides to give him 9/. per month, 
an increased allowance, as he will be expected not only to see to 
the speedy dispatch of the William but to be diligent in the survey 
and oversight of the other ships, that they may be hastened on 
their voyage. He is enjoined to give in a weekly report of pro- 
gress. Boatswain Ingram ordered to attend the next court and 
give account of the breaking up of the William's hold, when a 
great quantity of loose pepper, iron crows, hoops, and other pro- 
visions were embezzled. The Conde de Lynhares, late Viceroy of 
Goa, complaining in a letter to Mr. Methwold (now read) that he 
has not received what he expected in satisfaction for his 3,000 
seraphins, the allowance made of 6s, the rial being far short of 
what might have been gained by exchange from Goa to Lisbon, 
the Court, in regard of the many favours and courtesies shown by 
the late Viceroy during his government to Mr. Methwold and the 
Company, orders that the sum of 150/. be added to what has been 
already given ; and Mr. Methwold, who thinks this addition will 
content the late Viceroy, is desired to make it over to him by 
exchange or otherwise. The sum of 134/. to be paid for wages 
and provisions at Blackwall. On reading letters from Mr. Whit- 
tacres from Holland, signifying that the Dutch intend to send 
sixteen large ships to the East this spring, some to sail by the ist 
of November, Mr. Bowen is instructed to write a letter advising 
what ships and provisions the Company intends sending to India 
this year, which letter is to be sent by the said Dutch ships. 

A Court of Committees, October 21, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 316). 

Two chests of sugar, sent by Thomas Gee, master's mate of the 
Williatn, to his wife, are to be delivered to her and 5/. charged to 



EAST INDIA COMPANY loi 

his account for freight. Objections against Nicholas Gove read ; it 
appearing that he is only indebted 4/. to the Company, his account 
is cleared, but the pearls belonging to him are to be retained until 
Alderman Highlord has looked up certain information against 
Gove received from Persia. The scandalous paper published and 
set up in the Exchange by Richard Boothby ^ is read ; and the 
Committees, conceiving that not only they but Sir Morris Abbott 
(whose honour and reputation they intend to vindicate as their 
own) is much injured by it, direct that the notes formerly taken of 
the Company's proceedings with Boothby be looked up, the better 
to enable legal action to be taken against him for this malicious 
libel, their learned Counsel to be shown these notes and advise as 
to the best course to be pursued. The bond of Emanuel Altham, 
deceased, late a factor at Armagon, to be cancelled, as his accounts 
have long since been cleared and there are no complaints against 
him ; but his executors are to give a general release. The Refor- 
mation to be victualled, and her master, Mr. Baily, to go with all 
speed to Gravesend. Mr. Muns reporting that the Discovery is 
found too defective to be repaired to go at the expected time to 
Bantam, it is resolved that the William be sent in her stead ; and 
Mr. Prowd is required to do his best that if possible she may leave 
the Downs before Christmas. Mr. Polstead reports that he under- 
wrote to take his division out in cloves, but on claiming them 
he was refused, all having been delivered to others ; he therefore 
demands his dividend in money, according to agreement. He is 
told that it is his own fault for not applying in time ; that he shall 
have the money, but he is desired to wait for a month, because it 
is now so scarce, and interest shall be allowed him for the time he 
waits ; to this he agrees. Mr. Fotherby presents an account of the 
Company's small ordnance. The Court, seeing that more will be 
wanted, recommends their supply to the care of Alderman Gayre 
and Mr. Kerridge. Mr. Cordwell to be paid 183/. 15^-. for repairing 
151 barrels of gunpowder, he returning 147 barrels, and 8/. for its 

1 See the previous volume, p. 301, &c. ; also The English Factories in India, 1624-9, 
p. xxxii. In Boothby 's True Declaration he states that, in order to provoke the Company 
to bring an action, he fixed a protest on the gate of the East India House, on Sir Morris 
Abbot's gate, and on four pillars of the Exchange ; but that nothing was done beyond 
tearing down the papers. 



loa COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

carriage and cooperage. John Perkins' account to be cleared. 
William Cary to be paid the 70/. which he lent to Nicholas Weddall, 
carpenter of the Expedition. Mr. Crane, Victualler of the King's 
Navy, to be paid 180/. for pipestaves bought for the Company's 
use. {1% pp.) 

A Court of Committees, October 23, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 319). 

Several of the adventurers have refused to take out their divi- 
dends in silk, and demand them in money, although there is plenty 
of silk to satisfy all ; among them is Mr. Smithwick, who requires 
his in ' a peremptory and comaunding way ', which the Court thinks 
not only audacious on his part but contrary to the tenor of the 
preamble agreed to by the General Court. It is resolved to bring 
the matter before the next General Court. Mr. Backhouse, who 
lately took out a division in calicoes, requires satisfaction for five 
pieces which he asserts were missing ; he is told not to require 
satisfaction from the Company but from his own servant, through 
whose carelessness the calicoes must have been lost. The money 
ordered to be paid Mr. Cordwell is to be stayed until he gives good 
reason why he returned only 147 of the 151 barrels of gunpowder 
sent to him to be repaired. A suit to be instituted against Messrs. 
Pigeon and Warren, linendrapers, who two years ago bought cali- 
coes for which they have not yet paid, pretending that many were 
defective. Consideration had of an order of Court of the 3rd Octo- 
ber, 1632, by which the late Thomas \should be Robert] Littler 
was entertained by the Company ; and, notwithstanding that advice 
from India states that he died indebted to the Company, this order 
being too positive to evade, it is decided to pay Stephen Burton 
1,0)1. in full satisfaction of what is due to Littler. Mr. Barnes, 
late master of the William, is given 100 marks for bringing his 
ship into the Downs without touching at any port in the West 
Country. Mr. Prowd, late master of the Reformation, who per- 
formed a like service, is given 50/. Mr. Young to be paid 
137/. IS. cjd. for the week's wages at Blackwall, and 60/. for two 
weeks' wages for the ships afloat. Boatswain Goad petitions to be 
employed again ; but the Court hearing that thirty-two bales of 
calicoes or other goods have been conveyed secretly out of the 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 103 

London upon her coming into the Downs, of which Goad as boat- 
swain should be able to give an account and say to whom they 
belonged, tells him that until he does so he cannot be entertained. 
He confesses that goods were conveyed secretly out of the said ship, 
and upon his taking exception to this, James Birkdale, master's mate, 
told him that he was now ' Jack out of office ', and therefore had 
nothing to do with it. Between the Downs and Gravesend * a light- 
horseman ' ^ came to the ship's side and took out 33 bales of goods, 
whether calicoes or not he cannot say nor whither they were taken, 
but they belonged to Captain Wills and Birkdale. Spiller's bill of 
38/. 4J'. 6d. for discharge of the London to be paid. Some broad 
and narrow calicoes sent in the Discovery to Mr. Methwold from 
President Fremlyn, to provide necessaries for his return to England, 
are ordered to be delivered freight free, because of the good services 
rendered the Company by the said President. (4 //.) 

A Court of Committees, October 24, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. '>p<'^' 

Mr. Bailey, master of the Reformaiiojt, reporting that in his 
opinion the forty barrels of powder allotted to his ship will not be 
sufficient in case of encountering an enemy, the Court orders that 
he be supplied with fifty barrels, on condition that if he arrives 
safely at Bantam he shall leave twenty barrels there. An abstract 
read of a letter from Sir William Boswell, the King's Agent in 
Holland, concerning some proceedings of the Dutch ; after con- 
sideration the Court resolves not to stir in this matter now, but to 
wait until Parliament sits and then put forward what upon debate 
shall be thought requisite for the Company's good. Discussion 
ensues as to what is fit to be proposed for the approval of the 
general court to be held next Tuesday concerning ships and stock 
for the northwards and southwards. The Committees declare their 
resolve to send the London and Discovery to Surat with 35,000/. or 
36,000/. quick stock, the Reformation for the Coast, and the Mary 
and William for Bantam ; also to freight a third ship for the last- 
named place, which they are induced to do on hearing the relation 
delivered in Court by Mr. Pinson, late President at Bantam, that 
there is in the country a stock of 75,000/. belonging to the Com- 

' An old name for the boat now termed a gig. 



I04 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

pany. At the same time it is decided not to proceed herein without 
the consent of the generality, but as this concerns the profit and 
maintenance of the trade (which otherwise must decline and be in 
a manner deserted), it is resolved that this business be proposed to 
them and a motion made by the Governor that, if they dislike so 
many ships and so much stock being sent out, they should nominate 
a committee to join with the standing Committees to determine 
this business. The stock to be sent in the said three ships to 
Bantam is not yet decided, but consideration of the same is to be 
had at the next meeting and then offered for the determination of 
of the generality. It is also thought fit to acquaint the generality 
with the good news received from Bussora of 600 bales of silk sent 
from Gombroon, which will encourage the adventurers to agree to 
the before-mentioned propositions. Mr. Spurstowe acquainting 
the Court that he and Mr. Ashwell have concluded a bargain with 
a Frenchman for the 650 pieces of calico he desired, at the rates 
mentioned in the note presented this day by Mr. Bowen, the same 
is approved and confirmed. (2^//.) 

A Court of Committees, October 30, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 325). 

Mr. Christopher Coulson presents a written intimation that 
Robert Coulson, late President at Bantam, had during his lifetime 
a supposed good estate, but being dead it is found that he is 
indebted to the Company for ' arrerages ' charged by Mr. Wil- 
loughby upon Gerald Pinson and the said Robert Coulson, as 
appears by Mr. Willoughby's letter to the Company, which letter 
Mr. Coulson desires may be produced in order to see how Mr. 
Pinson is cleared ; meanwhile Mr. Coulson desires that the accounts 
of Mr. Pinson and William and Henry Johnson may not be cleared 
until it is seen what has become of Robert Coulson's estate, by 
witnesses to be produced by his friends. Mr. Pinson's estate is 
ordered to be detained until Mr. Coulson has been heard. The 
request of Nathaniel Deards, for remission of brokes incurred for 
late payment of his adventure, is referred to the General Court. 
The account of Nicholas Gove, deceased, ordered to be cleared and 
the parcel of pearls belonging to him delivered to his adminis- 
tratrix, she paying what is due to the Company and giving 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 105 

a general release. The Husband is directed to send ten chests of 
rials aboard the Reformation. Mr. Governor proposes that con- 
sideration be had of what is fitting to put before the generality in 
the afternoon. This occasions a debate concerning the trade and 
the hopefulness of its being prosecuted with good success, either 
by the present adventurers or by such as shall underwrite for this 
year's stock, the casualties which of late years have made the said 
trade so unprofitable being removed, thus restoring it to its 
' pristyne goodnesse '. After many propositions to extinguish the 
Company's debt by bringing in money, expectation of a settlement 
of the affairs of State and encouragement from thence to pursue the 
trade and procure privileges, especially in the matter of restraining 
private trade, with determination for the honour of the State and 
of the Company not to desert the trade now so ' perspicuously 
good ', it is resolved to acquaint the generality with the state of the 
trade to the northwards, and how fit it is that the present adven- 
turers (who have suffered so much) should benefit first thereby ; if 
not, then to let such as will subscribe for this year's stock. The 
better to accomplish this it is suggested that a committee of the 
generality should join with the standing Committees and consult 
how this business may best be effected, what privileges should be 
procured, and so prepare that, the trade being found good for the 
commonwealth, it may be countenanced and confirmed by Parlia- 
ment, the times being so hopeful and nothing lacking but money, 
which want will be remedied if only encouragement is given. It 
is also resolved to send advices to Surat, ordering those there to 
take up 20jOCo/. at interest to be invested beforehand, and after- 
wards to make addition to that stock, according to encouragement 
received, by the ships to be sent in the spring. Mr. Burton 
offering to buy dust of indigo by treaty and refusing to make any 
price by the candle, is told that, as the indigo is set up in the bill 
at the Exchange, it cannot be withdrawn, but must be sold this 
afternoon. {2 pp.) 

A Court of Sales and a General Court, October 30, 
1640 {Court Book, vol. xvii, p. 327). 

Sale of dust of pepper ; of light, stalky, stony, wet, dry, and 
mouldy pepper ; of dust and garble of mace and brown mace ; of 



io6 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

dust and garble of cloves ; of dust of Lahore indigo, and of gum- 
lac ; with names of purchasers and prices. After this sale Mr. 
Governor desires all who are not free of the Company to withdraw. 
Then the proceedings of the last general court are read, which 
court Mr. Governor intimates was called to give the generality an 
account of the Company's estate at Bantam, computed at about 
75,000/., when it was agreed to send out ships to fetch the same 
home. This present court is called to hear an account of the 
Company's estate to the northwards, Persia, and other parts 
adjacent, on receipt of letters from Spahan and Bussara, telling of 
the expectation of 600 bales of silk laden aboard the Supply at 
Gombroon last April, which in all probability arrived at Surat in 
May. To bring home the said silk and other goods there is but 
the Crispiaii, which can only carry about half. The Committees, 
having considered this and heard Mr. Methwold's opinion, think fit 
to dispatch two ships of 300 or 400 tons to Surat this year, and to 
send in them 25,000/. in money, besides coral and cloth, which may 
amount to another 13,000/. ; this they are encouraged to do because 
all commodities are plentiful, and through the peace with the 
Portugals many accommodations can be given by them ; therefore 
the Governor desires the generality to express their opinion. One 
of the generality alleges that the Company sends out ships and 
trades to no purpose, as one-fourth part is for other men's profit, 
private trade being sold to the great detriment of the Company, he 
having heard lately of twenty-eight bales of cloth brought home by 
one man in one ship ; to this Mr. Deputy replies that the Com- 
mittees have just lately heard of thirty-two bales being brought 
home by one man, which they mean seriously to examine. Mr. 
Governor again desires an expression of opinion concerning the 
sending out of ships and stock, and as an encouragement requests 
Mr. Methwold to give his opinion concerning the trade. Thereupon 
the latter declares that he has ' scene the revolucion of time in his 
fifteen yeares service and imployment under this Company, which 
beganne twenty five yeares since ' : first, in the wrong done by the 
Dutch, when the Company had twenty ships sent out and scarce 
one returned, and those that did brought such a charge that their 
goods yielded no profit ; secondly, the wars with the Portugals, 
when the Company had to send three ships to protect one ; and 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 107 

thirdly, the infinite charge caused by the famine and pestilence in 
the Mogul's dominions, when goods were bought dear there and 
sold cheap here. But since then expenses are reduced, and during 
his last employment goods carried between port and port yielded 
20,000/. to the Company. Then the truce with the Portugals and 
the trade obtained with Synda (where calicoes and indigo may be 
had in good quantities and as cheaply as at Surat) must be con- 
sidered. He thinks that the Dutch would give many thousand 
pounds to see this trade deserted in the present good times ; also 
that if some of the Company would abandon it, others would take it 
up until all resume it. In his opinion it would be wise to send two 
ships to Surat this year, the fittest being the London and the Dis- 
covery, for if the London only should return it is necessary for 
a good ship to be there for protection against ' the Mallabarrs ', who 
have taken the Comfort ^ and another small ship of sixty tons ; 
besides, there is a report that the French have gone to Surat again, 
and the mischief done by the pirates last time cost the Company 
and their servants a great deal of money and trouble. Mr. 
Governor again calls for the opinion of the generality, as the 
Reformation is now at Gravesend bound for Masulipatam and 
letters are to be dispatched by her, which may be sent on to Surat 
in about twenty-five days. Another of the generality observes 
that there is no question but that the trade is both honourable and 
profitable, but the doubt is whether to employ their own or freighted 
ships. Mr. Governor puts it to the question, when it is agreed 
by a general erection of hands to send two ships ; the stock to be 
sent is left to the discretion of the Committees, but is not to exceed 
28,000/. On petition of Margaret Kirby, the brokes charged upon 
her late husband, Jefifery Kirby, are reduced from eighteen to eight 
per cent., as was formerly allowed Captain Milward and others, and 
the Court orders that a like allowance be made to all who have 
paid in their subscriptions, except to Richard Moorer, who is first 
to pay in his subscription and eight per cent, interest, when 
a similar reduction shall be made him. Mr. Smithwick moves 

^ The Comfort was on her way from Masulipatam to Snrat, when on November i6, 1638, 
she was attacked near Cannanore by nine Malabar junks. After a desperate flght, which 
lasted eight hours, the English blew up their ship. The few survivors were taken on 
shore, and not long after were ransomed by Capt. Weddell. See 0. C. 1671 and 1725; 
also Mandelslo's Travels, 1662 ed., p. 108. 



io8 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

for mitigation of his brokes in the Persia Voyages, pretending 
some mistake was made in the drawing up of the order ; but this is 
refused. {4^ pp) 

A Court of Committees, November 4, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 332). 

Boatswain Goad being questioned concerning the goods con- 
veyed secretly out of the London, which he formerly told the Court 
belonged to Captain Wills and his mate, Mr, Birkdale, seems un- 
willing now to disclose anything more; whereupon it is resolved 
that unless he deals fairly and clearly on this subject at the next 
court he shall not be employed again. A paper presented by 
Mr. Mun from Captain Mynors is read, concerning the inconve- 
niency of casks not being hooped with iron, the gross abuses of 
pursers, and means to prevent private trade. Upon this it is 
observed that the pursers do wrong by allowing the ship's company 
to take up more than one-third of their wages ; also that at the de- 
parture of the ships many tradesmen furnish the Company's 
servants with money or goods to be repaid on their return at the 
rate of two or three for one, which not only increases private trade 
but impoverishes all who do so, for at their return their estate 
entered in the purser's books is challenged by the lenders and thus 
the men lose the benefit of their labours and the lenders make un- 
reasonable profits. To prevent these abuses, it is ordered that 
henceforth no warrants for payment of wages or of debts entered 
in the purser's books be made without the approbation of the 
Court. The stay lately made of money due to Mr. Cordwell for 
mending defective powder is now removed on his explanation, and 
payment ordered at the rate of 3^. per lb. according to agreement. 
At the request of Mr. Baily, the Court agrees that he shall not be 
forced to stay in India more than two years. Mr. Stephen Burton 
and Mr. Baynebrigge offer to buy dust of flat indigo. The Com- 
mittees remember the abuse committed by some who bought dust 
of indigo before and, converting it into a solid body after the 
manner of true indigo, sold it as such and at as dear a rate ; they 
therefore inform Messrs. Burton and Baynebrigge that, though 
willing to sell the dust to those who offer the best price, yet they 
will only do so on condition that those buying it be bound in double 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 109 

the value to sell it in dust and not made into a solid body. The 
conditions of sale not being agreed to, the said dust of indigo is 
ordered to be put up for sale by the candle this day sennight at a 
Court of Committees. The Court understanding that certain pay- 
ments made from the estates of deceased servants in India for the 
hospital at Poplar cause much complaint, these being exacted (as 
is reported) by a kind of compulsion on account of some order of 
the Court rather than given of free will, which is thought to detract 
from the honour of the Company and its intended charitable work, 
it is resolved that notice be given to all Presidents and others 
employed in the Company's service that nothing is to be collected 
from the estates of deceased servants towards the said hospital, and 
that any such gift shall be left as a voluntary offering. Robert 
Hussy accepted as security for William Mynn, purser's mate of the 
Reformation. (3^ //>.) 

A Court of Committees, November 6, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 'iy:^). 

The accounts of the late John Milward being cleared, his bond 
to keep from private trade, together with another bond entered into 
by his mother, Katherine Milward, is ordered to be delivered to the 
latter, she giving a general release. John Smith, citizen and leather- 
seller of London, accepted as security for his son John, entertained 
as purser for the Reformation. Steevens to be paid 50/. y. 8d. for 
timber bought by him of George Maplesden. The Court spends 
the remaining time in perusal of letters to be sent by the Reforma- 
tion to the Coast. (^ /.) 

A Court of Committees, November 9, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. ^i?^)' 

The Committees arc reminded of the necessity of preparing 
themselves, so that, if called upon by Parliament (as they arc likely 
to be), they may be able to give a reason why the Second Joint 
Stock in so many years did not yield such profit as other adven- 
tures have. This is approved of and thought meet to be recorded, 
that both now and hereafter the Court may be vindicated from any 
imputation of ill government, when the many and great losses 
which have befallen the said Stock shall be revealed. One of the 



no COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Committees produces a collection of such important losses as have 
happened, whereby it appears that the said losses amounted to 
above two millions and the damages to no less a sum. Hereupon 
motion is made that an account of profit and loss be kept, so that 
the true reason may appear why the said Stock did not prove as 
profitable as was expected. To this it is replied that such an 
account could not well be kept, but for the Third Stock it might 
be. Thereupon Mr. Mun's collection is ordered to be registered, 
a book kept for the Second and Third Stock, and a collection made 
of all losses to the latter advised from the Indies ; which being 
done certain Committees are entreated to examine, perfect, and 
present it to the Court, when, being approved and made ' the act of 
the Court ', it may be recorded for satisfaction of any who shall 
object against the unprofitableness of the said Stock. (li//.) 

A Court of Committees, November n, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 338). 

A relation, drawn up by Mr. Hunter, of the state of the Com- 
pany's trade to the southwards, is read and referred for future 
consideration. Proposal is made to write to Mr. Throgmorton and 
direct him, if the pepper is sold at Leghorn, to return the proceeds 
in rials of eight rather than by exchange, but if it is not sold then 
to take up at interest money to the value of the said pepper (over 
and above the price of the coral) and send it in rials of eight to 
arrive about next February ; some contradiction being raised, con- 
clusion herein is deferred. About 100 barrels of dust of flat indigo 
put up for sale by the candle at %od. per lb. at three six months 
from next Christmas, on condition that it shall not be converted 
into paste, which is unlawful, but sold as bought ; many buyers 
appear but no offer is made. A General Quarter Court ordered to 
be called next Friday fortnight, being the last Friday in the term ; 
and at the instance of Mr. Smithwick a Court of Committees is to 
be called next Monday afternoon to hear propositions and demands 
he wishes to make. Copy of Monsieur Regemont's petition to the 
King, sent by Secretary Vane to the Governor, is read, and Mr. My- 
nors called in and desired to answer some of the particular points 
this afternoon, that it may be shown to counsel for advice how to 
proceed, (i/) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY iii 

A Court of Committees, November 13, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 339). 

Thomas Elwood, keeper of the Company's cables, anchors, and 
all other stores at Sandwich, to be allowed a salary of 61. per 
annum. The Court resolves to consider Captain Pynn's offer of 
his services at the next election of commanders. A letter is read 
from Matthew Cradock, containing a proposition made by two 
Germans to extract from salt water fresh, which will never putrefy 
and so be most useful in the voyages to India.^ A glass of the said 
water is presented to the Court, but, there being much other busi- 
ness, this matter is referred for future consideration. Richard 
Grimsditch, by order from Alice, widow and executrix of Francis 
Downes, transfers to Jacques Oyles, merchant, 437/- los. adventure 
and profits in the First Joint Stock, upon which is divided 50?. per 
cent., amounting to 218/. 15^,, with an arrear of 4/. "js. lod. for late 
payment. Clare, widow of John Buck, and Robert Buck his 
administrator, transfer to Thomas Kerridge, merchant, 250/. adven- 
ture and profits in the Third Joint Stock, upon which is divided 
25/. per cent., amounting to 62/. 10s. Bartholomew Noaks, by 
order of John Wild, Esq., transfers to John Holloway, Esq., 500/. 
adventure and profits in the Third Joint Stock upon which is 
divided 375/. Thomas Smithwick, Senior, transfers to his son 
Thomas 400/. adventure in the Third Joint Stock, two-thirds being 
taken out. Mr. Cappur is directed to request Richard Salmon to 
recommend a competent person to assist Boatswain Ingram until 
the departure of the ships. Captain Mynors moving that money 
due unto him for wages and debts may be put into the Company's 
Treasury at the rate of seven per cent., payment thereof is ordered 
to be made him and his account to be cleared. The week's wages 
at Blackwall, amounting to 161/. ^s. bd., with 11/. 85-. for charges of 
the London, to be paid to John Spillcr in the absence of Mr. Young. 
(2 pp.) 

^ An invention of this kind had been tried in Methwold's return voyage in 1639, ''"* 'he 
sailors did not like the taste of the water thus obtained. See Mandelslo's Travels, English 
edition, p. 245. 



112 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, November i6, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 342). 

This court is specially called to hear the propositions and 
demands of Mr. Smithwick ; Dr. Merrick appears on his behalf 
and demands several sums of money which Smithwick pretends are 
due to him, namely, brokerage for ' Paules money ' ; allowance for 
pepper underwritten for by him, but sold afterwards with his consent 
to Edward Abbott ; brokerage for silk bought by Mr. Langham of 
the Company ; 50/. which he pretends was ordered him by the 
Earl of Dorset and Sir John Suckling upon a reference from the 
King ; mitigation of brokes in the Persia Voyages ; compensation 
for loss in the First Persia Voyage, when he paid in 300/., but his 
money was returned and his subscription vacated ; 50/. for one 
policy and 40/. for another for which he wished to underwrite 
by deputy, being himself out of town, but was not permitted ; 
and lastly money due for damage of wet pepper bought of the 
Company. These demands having been severally and at many 
courts answered, Smithwick is again told that nothing is due to 
him upon any one of them. He next advises Mr. Governor and 
others present that many are indebted to the Company in large 
sums of money, long since due for goods and brokes to the value of 
10,000/., and desires that all such accounts may be examined and 
perfected ; reply is made that this matter was seen to four or five 
months ago and Committees appointed to call upon all who are 
indebted to the Company. A bill of exchange for 200/. is pre- 
sented from William Newman at Dublin, payable to Francis Roe 
for a like sum received from his Agent, Richard Chapman, at 
Dublin. {\\ pp.) 

A Court of Committees, November 20, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 343). 

A Court of Committees to be called next Monday week in the 
afternoon, to settle the accounts and differences between the late 
Sir Dudley Diggs and the Company. A letter of the loth of June 
last ^ from the factors in Persia is read, containing a proposition for 
recovery of customs due at Gombroon, which for many years have 

^ See 0, C. 1753. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 113 

been unjustly detained, it is advised that a ship and pinnace, well 
manned and fortified, be sent to stay a whole monsoon in the river 
[sic] of Gombroon, when if nothing can be accomplished by friendly 
means then what is due to the Company shall be taken by force 
from all Moors' junks and other vessels before they land any of their 
goods. This proposition is well received, but referred for further 
consideration. Kentledge to be bought for the William, as she is 
ready to be launched. Captain Wills, understanding that complaints 
have been made against him concerning the cloth conveyed secretly 
out of the London, denies all knowledge of this, and asserts that he 
had no part in the said cloth nor does he know to whom it belongs. 
In order to get at the truth, the Court directs that Captain Wills, 
Mr. Birkdale, Boatswain Goad, and William Hurt, late purser in 
the London, all attend the court next Monday. Sir William 
Russell requesting by letter that one of his sons may be enter- 
tained as a factor at Surat, the Secretary is directed to write to 
Sir William and express the regret of the Company at being unable 
to accede to his request, as no more factors are to be sent out. 
The petition of John Polleyn, late master's mate of the Reformation, 
concerning his private trade is referred to certain Committees. 
John Gearing, Senior, John Gearing, Junior, and Herryott Wash- 
borne accepted as securities for mouldy pepper, and Robert Stone, 
Michael Castell, and Sabian Staresmore for dust of cloves. Messrs. 
Prowd and Fotherby are directed to advise with Steevens as to the 
possibility of the London being trimmed and launched by next 
January, and if so to bring her into dock, but not otherwise. After 
some dispute it is decided to freight a ship of not less than 400 
tons to fetch the goods from Bantam and those parts, but which 
ship to send is left for future consideration. (3 //.) 

A Court of Committees, November 33, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 347). 

Wednesday next come sennight is appointed for election of 
officers for the ships. A note to be sent to Mr. Fotherby to 
instruct him to call the carpenters, etc., at 6 o'clock, before the 
labourers, and to warn Boatswain Went to attend the London with 
men to get in timber. Mr. Fotherby requests that his salary, 
which twelve months ago was reduced from 120/. to Ho/., may be 



114 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

restored to its former level, his work being as much as formerly ; 
after consideration the Court resolves to give him a gratification 
of ICG marks for his services from the time of the said abatement 
until next Lady Day. (^ p) 

Warrant to the Exchequer, November 24, 1640 {Public 
Record Office : Dom. Chas. /, cccclxxii, No. 1 7). 

Warrant to pay Francis, Lord Cottington, 7,283/. \\s. \d. in full 
of 63,243/. I \s. id. [i-zV] payable for pepper which he bought of the 
East India merchants, for which he is to account. {Docqiict) 

A Court of Committees, November 25, 1640 [Cotirt Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 348)- 

The General Court desiring that a ship of 400 or 500 tons shall 
be freighted for Bantam, the Committees direct that a bill be set up 
at the Exchange inviting offers. Mr. Mosse to be paid 33^. 4^. for 
drawing up and engrossing two charterparties, one for Captain 
Jourdayne's ship, the Caesar, the other for the Mary, whose master 
is Roger Martyn. Thomas Steevenson, wharfinger, moving for 
payment of his account, long in dispute, it is referred to Messrs. 
Ashwell and Massingbird, who, after conferring with Steevenson, 
decide to clear the said account up to last Midsummer, and to 
deduct 25/. 1 8j-. ; this is confirmed by the Court, and Steevenson 
ordered to be paid the 1 30/. remaining due to him. John, son of John 
Langly, William and Anthony, sons of Robert Bateman, Treasurer 
of the Company, and John, son of Thomas Munn, admitted to the 
freedom of the Company by patrimony, each paying loj-. to the 
poor-box. According to advices received, the following articles 
are to be sent in the William as presents for the King of Bantam 
and for other occasions, viz. three large looking-glasses ; five or 
six dozen knives ; three chambletts; to the value of 10/. in buttons, 
loops, silk and gold ; one brass standard with weights, and two iron 
beams ; all which Messrs. Kerridge and Methwold are to provide, 
and Mr. Rilston two or three tons of iron in bars and half a ton 
drawn out to make hoops. Mr. Bowen is desired to buy paper, ink 
and quills for the Bantam factory, and the following articles are to be 
provided as presents for the king of Gulcondah : ten yards each of 
scarlet, crimson, and violet satin ; the King's picture in Parliament 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 115 

robes ; a bufif coat ; a suit of fine light armour ; one perspective 
and one ' multiplyeing ' glass ; and one large pair of globes. Upon 
petition of the smiths working for the Company, they are allowed an 
increase of i^d. per cwt. for ironwork till coal is cheaper, {'i- pp.) 

A Court of Committees, November 26, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 350). 

Sir Henry Garway produces his account, made up by Sam- 
brooke, and thinks he is justified in taking exception to some of 
the charges ; he doubts not but to be able to show upon examina- 
tion that his debt is not more than 1,500/., and that the Company 
has 3,000/. of his for divisions ; this he desires may be retained 
until the accounts are cleared. Dispute ensues as to the sale of the 
Company's silk. Some think that, as money is wanted for dispatch 
of the ships and great sums are being paid for interest, it would be 
better to sell now ; others opine that this would be disadvantageous, 
as the price, which is now very low, is sure to rise before next 
Midsummer, for little more is to be expected from Persia after the 
arrival of the ships from thence. Finally, the matter is left for 
further consideration. Motion made to propose to the General 
Court appointed for this afternoon that, for the better raising of 
means to continue the trade, the old Stock shall be valued at even 
money, and a new Company coming in should join with the 
old, and by bringing in 100,000/. the present wants will be sup- 
plied and the trade maintained. To this it is objected that no man 
will adventure his estate in this trade until the impositions are 
removed and the aggrievances repaired by Parliament, and more 
especially till the Company's charter is renewed with such privi- 
leges and advantages as are fitting and confirmed by Parliament, 
and all others stayed from trading to the East Indies ; if this be 
done there is no doubt that the trade will flourish and men will be 
induced to underwrite for large subscriptions, but not otherwise. 
(i|/A) 

A Quarterly General Court, November 27, 1640 {Court 
Book, vol. xvii, p. 352). 

The Governor represents that this meeting is called according to 
order; that the Committees have only to report the receipt last 

I 2 



ii6 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

week of letters from Spahan [Ispahan] dated the loth of June last, 
advising the dispatch of 527 bales of silk from Persia to Surat ; 
that the Reformation set sail from the Downs last Friday for 
Masulipatam, and that, by God's blessing, the William will be 
ready to sail for Bantam about Christmas, the Mary to follow as 
soon as may be, and the London and Discovery for Surat. Mr. 
Smithwick proposes the sale of Mr. Jesson's adventure, which is 
stayed in the Company's hands at the request of Clement Mosse ; 
but on Mr. Mosse objecting to this, the Court leaves them to settle 
it among themselves, and confirms a former order of September 20, 
1639, for detention of the said adventure. It is next proposed 
that a 200/. adventure be sold by the candle to ascertain the value ; 
it is set up at 30/., viz. 5/. profit upon the 25/. remaining, 75/. per 
cent, being divided formerly, none to bid less than 20j. ; but no bid 
is made and the candle goes out. Thomas Smithwick presents 
a written proposition that six, eight, or ten of the ' deepe adven- 
turers ' should undertake the management of the remainder of this 
Stock, in such a manner that the trade shall speedily enlarge more 
than it has ever done and yield fifty per cent, profit to the adven- 
turers for many years, keeping the Stock in its full value and 
esteem ; he desires that a committee of the deepest adventurers, 
both of the generality and the sworn Committees, may be appointed 
and meet speedily and often to examine all matters amiss in the 
Company's affairs, and to mature and ripen this proposition. Here- 
upon the Court directs that ten of the deepest adventurers of the 
standing committee and ten of the deepest adventurers of the 
generality be entreated to meet next week to consider this propo- 
sition, and the following week a general court shall be called to 
hear their opinions concerning the same. It shall be sufficient if 
eleven out of the twenty chosen meet. (2//.) 

'A Committee of the Deepest Adventurers,' November 
30, 1640 {Cojirt Book, vol. xvii, p. 354). 

Sir John Wolstenholme, Sir Nicholas Crispe, William Cokayne, 
Robert Bateman, John Langham, John Holloway, Henry Polstead, 
John Massingbird, George Francklyn, Edward Abbot, and Richard 
Davies meeting in committee according to the order of the last 
General Court, first of all read Thomas Smithwick's remonstrance 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 117 

and the order of the General Court upon it. To the latter Smith- 
wick takes exception, and desires to proceed to discuss 'things 
amisse in the Company ', complaining that neither the Committees, 
the Accountant, nor the Auditor have performed their duties ; but 
he is requested to begin at the main proposition, which is that six, 
eight, or ten ' deepe ' adventurers should undertake the management 
of this Stock, so that it may produce 50/. per cent, for many years ; 
which if he can make good the committee will willingly hear him. 
Smithwick makes a computation of the stock abroad and of the 
present state of the Company, and insists upon his proposition that 
some deep adventurers will undertake the business and expect 
nothing but what they shall advance above 50/. per cent, (which 
they will divide yearly to the adventurers for seven years) ; they 
will attend in consultation daily, but will not take possession of the 
Company's estate, books, or accounts, but let these remain with the 
present officers, provided that if any is found faulty he shall be 
removed, all officers to be directed by the said undertakers only. 
On being asked to name these undertakers, he replies that they 
would consent to have a certain number of adventurers to superin- 
tend their actions, and any proposing something better for the good 
of the Company the present undertakers will subscribe to it. Being 
pressed for names, he nominates Messrs. Massingbird, Methwold, 
and himself, saying that he will name the rest some other time. 
Messrs. Massingbird and Methwold being present, utterly refuse to 
act, yet acknowledge that Smithwick had proposed something of 
the kind to them and they had replied that they were willing to do 
anything for the Company's good, but committed themselves 
to nothing. A Committee observes that unless some undertake to 
make this proposition good it is an aspersion upon the present 
government, for there can be no more hope of advancing the trade 
in the hands of a few than now that it is in the hands of twenty-four 
able merchants, who govern the affairs of the Company by patent, 
and unless a new patent is procured it cannot be done by a less 
number. It is further observed that Mr, Smithwick's proposition 
implies an absolute undertaking, which means the undertaking of 
the debt of 300,000/. Finally, Mr. Deputy is desired to report as 
the opinion of this committee that, if the names of any undertakers 
be presented under their own hands, who will engage to make good 



ii8 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

not 50/. but 40/. per cent., the committee will meet again, but if not 
the proposition is thought to be a mistake. {'2.\pp-) 

A Court of Committees, December 2, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. '>,S^). 

This being the day appointed for the election of officers for the 
ships to be sent out this year to the Indies, many names of former 
captains are presented to the Court. Captain Wills is first con- 
sidered, and although he is well reported of, yet because he has not 
given satisfaction concerning the goods alleged to have been taken 
secretly out of the London., it is thought best not to entertain him ; 
but on dispute the Captain is called in and questioned, and again 
denies all knowledge of the said goods. James Birkdale is then 
called in and questioned ; he likewise denies all knowledge of them. 
On his dismissal, one of the Committees intimates he has heard that 
part of the goods belong to some one now sitting in court, where- 
upon the Governor proposes that every one present shall declare on 
the oath he has taken to the Company whether he has any know- 
ledge of or interest in the said goods. This being done. Captain 
Wills is called in again and advised to try to discover who has been 
guilty of this act and to inform the Court between this and next 
Friday, when his entertainment shall be further considered. On the 
good report of Captain Mynors, he is appointed to go as master 
and commander in the Discovery for the northwards, at a salary of 
8/. per month, but not to be given half-pay until the ship is 
launched. John Barnes is next elected to go as master and 
commander in the Mary, at a salary of 8/. per month, but not to 
receive half-pay till his ship is launched ; he returns thanks for his 
entertainment, promises faithful service, and presents a written 
declaration of some observances he made during his last voyage in 
the William. In this he complains particularly of the quantity 
of private trade which by the connivance of the President, Mr. 
Muschampe, and Thomas Fenn, the purser, was put aboard the 
said ship, and so filled her up that it would have been impossible in 
case of need to get at her ordnance. John Clutton, recommended 
by Mr. Whittacres of Amsterdam, and Thomas Maulthus are 
chosen as pursers ; also John Syms, Thomas Chambers, Robert 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 119 

HayneSj and Anthony Withers as pursers' mates, but not appointed 
to any ships. This business is left until next Friday, when the rest 
of the men are to be chosen. (2^ //.) 

A Court of Committees, December 4, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 359)- 

William Garway, Junior, offering a ship of about 350 tons to 
freight for the Indies, certain Committees are desired to confer 
with him to-morrow afternoon, and, if they find that the ship is 
suitable and the terms reasonable, to make an agreement. A note 
is read from the House of Commons, requiring the Governor to 
appear before the Committee for Grievances next Wednesday at 
two o'clock on the complaint of James Cox ; whereupon Sir Henry 
Garway and Messrs. Kerridge and Methwold are entreated to 
accompany him to answer the said complaint ; and in order the 
better to prepare them, Mr. Acton is sent for and directed to retain 
Mr. Heme, the Company's counsel, who has before been instructed 
in this cause, and to appoint a meeting with him next Monday 
evening at the Governor's house ; meanwhile the papers formerly 
used when this cause was heard by the Lord Privy Seal and the 
Earl of Dorset are to be got ready for Mr. Heme's instruction. 
Captain Wills reports that he has in vain endeavoured to discover 
the owners of the goods taken out of the London ; the Court is ill 
satisfied, as it seems impossible that such a large proportion of 
goods can have been taken from the ship without connivance or 
great carelessness on his part. However, after long dispute it is 
decided to employ Wills as master (the Court resolving to enter- 
tain no man under the title of captain again) of the Londoti. He 
is enjoined to redeem this late error by care and diligence; not only 
to forbear private trade himself but to prevent others engaging in 
it ; and is offered and accepts ill. per month as salary. The Court 
having arranged to confer with William Garway about freighting 
his ship, and being now told of one bought by ' my Lord of Marle- 
borow ', which it is thought will be more commodious, as it is of 
greater burden and strength, Captain Wills is desired to go pri- 
vately to the said ship, lying near the new crane at Wapping, to 
examine her as though for himself, inquire her burden and price, 
and report to the Company, that it may be decided which ship to 



I20 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

employ. On the recommendation of Lord Say and Sele, John 
Perkins is elected a purser. (3^ pp.) 

A Court of Committees, December 9, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. '}fi'^' 

Charles, father of John Spiller, a factor in India, to receive ll. 
from the wages of his said son. John Barnes not being able to 
proceed on the intended voyage by reason of illness, and requesting 
that his post may be given to another. Captain Pynn, Captain 
Mynors, and Mr. Prowd are nominated to fill his place as commander 
in the Mary ; Captain Mynors is chosen. He having lately been 
appointed commander of the Discovery, another has to be chosen for 
this post, and John Allison, Gilbert Gardner, and Thomas Godfry 
are named ; the choice falls upon Allison, who is appointed accord- 
ingly, at a salary of 20 nobles per month, the other two being 
specially recommended for entertainment as chief masters' mates 
in such ships as they shall desire. Stephen Burton reports the 
presentation of a petition in Parliament,^ seconded by the dyers of 
London, against the Company selling and he buying its indigo, and 
a copy of the said petition is read. The Court considers that this 
complaint can be easily answered, as this has been done since the 
formation of the Company and is warranted by its charter ; but it 
cannot be denied that at present it may prove hurtful, as many 
merchants are reported to declare that they will buy no more goods 
from the Company until this question is settled by Parliament, nor 
will they receive goods already bought. The Court resolves not 
to stir in this matter until required by Parliament to do so. Cap- 
tain Wills and Mr. Sothan report that according to direction they 
have examined the two ships belonging to Lord Marlborough and 
to Mr. Peter Pett, The former they consider would not be ser- 
viceable, she having two decks and being more fitted for a man-of- 
war than for a merchantman ; Mr. Pett's is a ship of good stowage, 
but so encumbered that it is not advisable to deal with her until 
she has been cleared in the Admiralty, Hereupon a dispute ensues 
as to the advisability of freighting any ships, as the want of money 

^ Read in the Commons on November 23, and referred to the Committee for 
Grievances. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 121 

is so great and the payment to be made on dividends very large ; 
but no decision is arrived at. (2| pp) 

A Court of Committees, December ii, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 365). 

The Court grants a request preferred by William Jesson con- 
cerning interest on money in the Company's hands of the stock of 
the late Thomas Jesson. Mr. Smithvvick pressing for the generality 
to be acquainted with his proposition made at the last general 
court, and with the opinions of the standing and select committee 
appointed by the generality, who have had one meeting, the Court 
directs that a general court be held for this purpose on next 
Thursday in the afternoon. Mr. Markham is desired to perfect 
John Young's account. The following men are entertained to serve 
in the ships, viz., for the William, Thomas Malthus as purser, with 
John Symms as his mate, and William Danvers as steward, with 
William Helmes for his mate ; for the Mary, John Clutton as 
purser, with Thomas Chambers for his mate, and William Parks as 
steward, with Robert Rudson for his mate ; for the Londoti, John 
Perkyns as purser, with Robert Haynes for his mate, and Thomas 
Coke as steward, with Francis Scattergood for his mate ; for the 
Discovery, William Hurt as purser, with Anthony Withers for his 
mate, and James Johnson as steward, with James Bridgeman as his 
mate. As many of the present factors desire to return home, the 
following men, who offer themselves for service at small wages, are 
chosen by the Court to go out in the ships, not as factors but to be 
taken ashore where they are wanted and employed in such posi- 
tions as the Company's affairs shall require and the Presidents 
think fit: John Stamford, formerly a purser and well recommended 
by the President and Council of Surat, to go in the Lojidon at a 
salary of 25/. per annum ; Silvester Grice, an old servant and a 
good linguist, to go in the William at a salary of 20/. per annum : 
Christopher Willoughby, who has lived in Spain, knows French 
and Spanish, and is recommended by the Earl of Lindsy, to go in 
the Mary at 20/. per annum ; William Slany, kinsman of Humphrey 
Slany, ' a proper man & a bredd merchant,' to go in the William 
at 25/. per annum ; Roger Farly, who has been employed in Bar- 
bary, is a linguist and a good accountant, to go in the Mary at 20/. 



122 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

per annum ; and Thomas, son of Valentine Markham, the Com- 
pany's Auditor, who is specially recommended by Mr. Styles, to go 
in the London at a salary of 20/. per annum. (2^ /A) 

A Court of Committees, December 16, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 368). 

Mr. Acton's bill of 9/. 4^-. 4^. for law causes to be paid. George 
Mynn transfers his adventure of 3,675/. with profits in the Third Joint 
Stock, upon which is divided 2,756/. 5^. and there remains 25/. per 
cent., being 918/. 15^., to James Oyles, merchant ; and the latter in 
his turn transfers to William Methwold, merchant, 1,837/. lOj-. ad- 
venture and profits in the Third Joint Stock, upon which is divided 
75/. per cent., being 1,378/. os. 6d., as also 218/. 15^-. adventure and 
profits in the said Stock on which is divided 50/. per cent., being 
T09/. 7 J. 6d. The wife of George Muschampe represents that she 
has often begged for a licence to enable her to repair to her hus- 
band, but has been told that her request is unreasonable until 
certain intelligence is received of his safe arrival ; now that this has 
been ascertained, she renews her suit, seconded by her husband. 
The Court, however, refuses her request, not only in respect of the 
charge, but because such a licence (which has never been granted 
before) would be an ill precedent, and she is advised to have 
patience until the expiration of her husband's contracted time, or, 
if she pleases, he shall be told to return by the next ships. Two 
small iron drakes are ordered to be provided for the Alary. 
Mr. Methwold presents the draft of a petition he has drawn up and 
intends to exhibit to Parliament against the piratical proceedings 
of Endymion Porter, Thomas Kenniston, and Samuel Bonneale in 
the Red Sea ; yet, notwithstanding that the damages sustained by 
the Company and Mr. Methwold's own sufferings are exceedingly 
well expressed, it is decided that this petition must be exhibited 
not in Methwold's but in the Company's name, and to this end the 
Governor, the Deputy, Sir Henry Garway, and certain other Com- 
mittees are entreated to advise with the Company's counsel and 
prepare the said petition, and to inform the generality of the same 
at the general court appointed to be held to-morrow, and to 
obtain their allowance and approval. Richard Swinglehurst is 
desired to prepare a copy of Smithwick's bill exhibited in Parlia- 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 123 

ment against the Company,^ that it also may be read to the 
generality to-morrow. The Court is informed that Andrew EUam, 
with the Company's permission, sent to his son Andrew at Surat 
11^ yards of 'scarlett' (costing in England 28/.), which on arrival 
was taken for the Company's use and given as a present to the 
Governor of Surat, and that no satisfaction has been received for 
the same ; whereupon order is given that ^^l. be now paid, on 
receipt of a discharge from those interested in the estate of Andrew 
Ellam and his son, both since dead. The Court being by the death 
of Alderman Abdy and the indisposition of Sir James Cambell 
deprived of their advice, Sir John Wolstenholme is chosen to 
supply the late Alderman's place ; but as Committees are elected 
by a General Court it is resolved to inform the generality to-morrow 
of this choice, at the same time intimating that it meets with the 
approval of all the Committees. The Court having in charity 
undertaken the education of Anthony, son of the late Henry Smith, 
a servant of the Company, and the youth being able to write a fair 
hand and having some knowledge of arithmetic, he is appointed to 
go in one of the ships to Surat, with a recommendation to the 
President to dispose of him as a * writer ' in the counting-house 
there, or as he shall see fit. (3 pp.) 

A General Court, December 17, 1640 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 
P- 371)- 

Mr. Governor represents that this court has been called to give 
account of what has been done in accordance with the order of the 
last General Court. The Committees then nominated have met, 
and Mr. Deputy, who was one of them, will report what passed 
concerning Mr. Smithwick's proposition. In the first place Smith- 
wick objected against the drawing up of the said order and against 
the nomination of the said committee, pretending that some of the 
largest adventurers were out of town, and others unable to come, 
for there were seven of the standing Committees to four of the 
generality. Finally, he complained that a second meeting of the 
said committee was not warned, according to Sir John Wolsten- 
holme's direction and his own desire. Notwithstanding all this 
he again declared that if the Court would hearken to his proposition 

' This cannot be traced in the Journals of either House. 



124 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

he would find out before the holidays men who would undertake 
the management of the remainder of the Stock, as he formerly said, 
to which if the Court would not listen he would propose something 
better, viz. to find out men who will undertake to manage the 
remainder of the Stock and not take above one-half of the overplus 
of gain above the fifty per cent, by him proposed, leaving the other 
half to the Company. In spite of Mr. Smithwick's complaints, the 
Court rested satisfied that the committee was nominated according 
to the true meaning of the order given at the last general court. 
Mr. Deputy reports that he and the others nominated met, and 
after hearing and considering this proposition found it improbable 
to be effected, Smithwick naming only three undertakers, two of 
whom utterly refused to act. Other Committees confirm this, and 
add that the reason why there is no inclination to hold a second 
meeting is because no undertaker appeared at the first. Smithwick 
is again required to name his men, but refuses to do so unless the 
Court will accept of such undertakers and upon such terms as were 
proposed in his paper read at the meeting of the committee and 
now again put forward. After further consideration and debate, it 
is resolved by a general erection of hands that this proposition 
cannot be considered any more, there being no probability of 
effecting it. Mr. Governor reports that some time ago it was 
moved that on Parliament assembling some matters which much 
concern the welfare of the Company's trade should be presented to 
it ; and that, as it is now sitting, the Court of Committees thinks it 
a fit time to do so, but will not act without consent of this Court 
and advice of counsel, that, if upon examination this trade is found 
to be advantageous to the King and commonwealth, it should be 
confirmed either by a new patent or by an Act of Parliament, in 
order to restrain depredations and injuries abroad, and to encourage 
the adventurers to proceed cheerfully at home. It was thereupon 
proposed that a committee, composed of some of the generality and 
some of the standing Committees, be nominated to draw up heads 
of what is fit to present, to sue for mitigation of impost, not to pay 
for what is spent at home, and to represent the business with the 
Hollanders ; but the Court of Committees resolved to prepare the 
business themselves, with the advice of counsel, and put the result 
before the General Court, to be altered or added to as may be 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 125 

thought fitting. Sir John Wolstenholme is elected by general 
consent as a Committee in the room of the late Alderman Abdy. 
Richard Moorer represents that, by reason of the many losses he 
has sustained, he is unable to pay in what he underwrote for, and 
therefore desires to be an adventurer for 400/. only (which is paid 
in), and that the remaining 650/. of his adventure may be sunk. 
This is objected to as likely to create a precedent, and the Governor 
alleges that a petition is now in Parliament against the Company 
upon the sinking of 800/. in a like manner, and that if Mr. Moorer's 
request is agreed to it will overthrow the Company in Parliament 
and be cited as an example for other great sums ; therefore he is 
desired to wait patiently, and hereafter this may be further con- 
sidered. Smithwick's petition to Parliament against the Company 
is read and left to Parliament to consider. He proposes that after 
payment of debts, one half of the yearly returns be divided among 
the adventurers and the other half employed to prosecute the 
trade ; whereupon he is told that when the expected goods arrive 
it will be time enough to consider of their disposal. (3 //.) 

A Court of Committees, December 18, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 374). 

A letter is read from Humphrey Slany, desiring that his nephew 
William may be sent to the northwards and not to the south. 
William Slany is called in and told that he can only be sent to 
Bantam, where able factors are most wanted ; yet, in favour to him 
and from respect to his uncle, his salary of 20/. per annum shall be 
raised, after the first year, 10/. yearly for seven years or so long as 
he remains in the service, and that he shall go in the Mary ; he is 
desired to inform his uncle of this and to give in his answer at the 
next court. The bestowal of a gratification of 100 marks on 
Mr. Fotherby is confirmed. Mr. Blunt is directed to postpone the 
preparation of spices to be given away at the New Year, as reso- 
lution on the subject of these gifts is deferred. The customary 
gifts at this time of the year of 10/. to the poor of Stepney and 10/. 
to poor widows are ordered to be made, and a chaldron of sea-coal 
and 20S. in money to be given to the almsmen at Poplar. A copy 
of Smithwick's petition to Parliament against the Company is read 
and debated, and it is proposed that, as no notice either to appear 



126 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

or to answer it has come from Parliament, but only by a private 
way, and that the said petition is subscribed only by Smithwick, 
though he pretends that it has the consent of many adventurers, 
it would be well to inquire who are the Committees appointed 
to consider it and then to wait on the chairman and inform him of 
Smithwick's condition and quality, of his insolences and distur- 
bances, and to desire that he be required not only to nominate 
those who have joined with him in this complaint, but also to 
procure their hands to the same, that the Company may know the 
complainants ; or to entreat that this petition be cast out of the 
House and Smithwick punished for his unjust clamours ; this is 
generally approved and is ordered to be done. It is then moved 
that, the better to show Smithwick's insolences and disturbances, 
a collection be made of the particulars, set down in writing, 
subscribed by men of quality, and produced to the House. Mr. 
Markham requests that his former salary may be restored and he 
given some gratification ; the Court, on learning that his present 
salary is only loo marks per annum, and that almost all his time is 
given to the Company's service, resolves to confirm his former 
salary of lool. per annum from last Midsummer, provided that 
he gives four days a week at least to the Company's occasions. 
(3//-) 

Account of Pepper bought from the East India Com- 
pany, December 21, 1640 {Public Record Office: Dom. Charles /, 
vol. cccclxxiii, No. 83). 

Account of 2,3 1 o bags of pepper bought by Francis Lord Cot- 
tington for the King, from the East India Company, and sold again 
by the King at a loss of 6,581/. os. \od. Underwritteji^ 

Order by Lord Treasurer Juxotifor Mr. Atiditor Bingley to cast 
this tip and certify if it be ' rightly cast or how he fijids it. 2 1 Dec. 
1640'. 

Certificate by George Bingley that he finds the same rightly cast 
np in each par tictdar. 26 Dec. 1640. (i /.) 

A Court of Committees, December 23, 1640 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 377). 

Mr. Massingbird reports that he has treated with Derrick Host 
for 50,000/. in rials of eight at a higher rate than before, because of 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 127 

the Company's need of them, and if he had omitted this oppor- 
tunity the rials would be carried to the mint to be newly coined, 
and the Company left without them for dispatch of the ships ; 
whereupon he is directed to conclude the bargain upon the best 
terms possible. Thomas Nevite accepted as security in the room 
of Abraham Chamberleyne, deceased, for a parcel of gum-lac bought 
by Francis Tryon. Samuel Sambrooke's petition is read, in which 
he states that since the death of Andrew Ellam, upwards of five 
years ago, he has assisted Mr. Bo wen at the counting-house and the 
warehouse ; that at his entertainment he was given a salary of 40/. 
per annum, with promise of enlargement in the future ; that for the 
last three years he has done the work formerly seen to by Mr, Rilston 
the Company's new Husband, and since Mr. Tynes left the service, a 
year and a half ago, he has assisted the Accountant and still does so ; 
the three men named were allowed aio/. per annum, and therefore 
he humbly requests not only some gratification, but that his salary 
may be increased. The Court seems disposed to accede to these 
requests, and 10/. per annum is proposed to be added to his salary; 
but hearing that Tynes is out of employment and intends to 
petition for re-entry into the Company's service, resolution herein 
is deferred until the next court. John Stanford, who came home in 
t\\e London and is re-entertained as a factor, is allowed remission of 
freight on coarse calicoes brought home by him as private trade. 
Joyce, wife of Richard Smart, a mariner of Wapping, presenting 
a certificate from Trinity House on behalf of her brother, Henry 
Smart, who was taken prisoner ten years ago by the Turkish 
pirates of Tunis, is given %os. from the poor-box towards her said 
brother's release. Anne, widow of Vincent Askwith, a former 
servant to the Company, is given \os. {2 pp.) 

A Court of Committees, December 30, 1640 (Court Bool:, 
vol. xvii, p. 379). 

Mr. Acton's bill of 9/. 16s. 6d. for law causes to be paid. The 
Company's petition to Parliament being read, it is thought meet to 
examine such witnesses as can speak materially in the business 
against Messrs. Porter, Kenniston, and Bonneale. Mr. Colson 
moving that his cousin Colson's account may be referred to two 
Committees, Messrs. Middleton and Ashwell arc nominated to 



128 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

examine it and also the accounts of Mr. Willoughby and Mr. 
Pinson. Mrs. Muschampe to be paid loo/. Messrs. Bludworth 
and Methwold are entreated to attend Parliament this afternoon 
about James Cox's petition. Answer approved to the bill of the 
legatees of the late Nicholas Askwith against the Company to be 
paid their legacies out of the said Askwith's adventure. The Court 
being moved as to what is to be done concerning Mr. Courteen's 
proceedings, whether to represent the illegal patent and the pro- 
ceedings thereon, it is resolved to insert a clause at the end of the 
petition showing the discouragement given the Company by these 
proceedings, a ship being now prepared to be set out ; and Richard 
Swinglehurst is desired to speak with Messrs. Heme and Acton 
concerning this, (i /.) 

Concerning Discount to be allowed on Pepper [1640?] 
{Public Record Office : Doni. Chas. /, vol. cccclxxv, No. 67). 

Reasons concerning discount to be allowed on the price of pepper. 
The English conceive that they ought to have '>fi\d. per pound for 
their pepper sold by the Dutch without abating the discount, (i/.) 

A Court of Committees, January 5, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 380). 

The draft of a petition (perused by the Recorder and Mr. Heme, 
the Company's counsel) intended to be presented to Parliament 
against Endymion Porter, Thomas Kenniston, and Samuel Bonneale 
for sending the Samaritan and the Roebuck to the East Indies, 
and against Cobb and Ayres, commanders of the said ships, for 
piracies committed by them in the Red Sea, is seriously debated 
and altered somewhat, and a general court is appointed to be held 
next Thursday afternoon for its consideration, together with the 
draft of another petition to Parliament against Mr. Courteene and 
his associates for trading to the East Indies contrary to the Company's 
charter and the King's gracious declaration ; for Mr. Courteene only 
requested His Majesty's permission to dispeed ships to fetch the 
stock sent out in those under command of Captain Weddall, not to 
settle factories and trade as he is now doing. As this business will 
require consideration, and some of the Committees will often be 
called upon to make good the complaints, the Governor, the Deputy, 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 129 

Sir Henry Garway, and other Committees are nominated to be 
present when the petition is given in, and to assist in answering 
objections when required by Parhament to do so. The Court, 
understanding that the Clerks of the Council and others are 
expecting their accustomed New Year gifts, orders that the Clerks 
be given 10/. each as formerly, and that 50/, be distributed by 
Mr. Sherborne amongst the secretaries of the Lord Treasurer, 
Lord Cottington, and Mr. Secretary Vane, the King's porters, the 
keepers of the Council Chamber, and other inferior officers, as is 
usual. On the motion of Sir Henry Garway, his servant John Syms, 
an able man who was chosen purser's mate for the Williani, is 
removed and placed as purser's mate in the Discover)'^ Anthony 
Withers to supply his place in the Wtllmm. (2 //.) 

A General Court, January 7, 1641 {Cot^rt Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 382). 

The Governor reports that at the last general court a pro- 
position was made to consider some of the Company's grievances 
and to present them to the ' Commons House of Parlyament '. 
The Governor and the Committees desired that some of the 
generality should assist in this matter, but this was not agreed to ; 
therefore the Court of Committees have framed a petition concerning 
the depredations in the Red Sea, and this court is held that the 
said petition may be considered by the generality. Hereupon the 
petition is read, and by a general erection of hands confirmed and 
ordered to be presented to Parliament in the name of the whole 
Company ; and the Governor is entreated to set his hand to it, the 
assembled court promising to save him harmless. The Governor 
further relates that the Court of Committees has drawn up the 
heads of a remonstrance concerning other ' aggrievances ' ; these 
are likewise approved and ordered to be presented to Parliament. 
(I A) 

A Court of Committees, January 8, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 383). 

Thomas Covell transfers to John Bludworth, merchant, 37.5/. in 
the Third Joint Stock, upon which is divided 278/. 6s. 8d. P'rances, 
widow and executrix of the late Richard Mantell, transfers to 



130 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

John Bludworth ^^-^l. \sic. ? s5'i^-\ ^^- ^^' in the said Stock, upon 
which is divided 311/. 6s. 6d., leaving 143/. os. 2d. Richard 
Younge, mercer, transfers to John Bludworth 325/. 19^. in the said 
Stock, upon which is divided 246/, ?>s. John Bludworth transfers to 
James Oyles 575/. in the said Stock, upon which is divided 75/. per 
cent., leaving 147/. 155. Captain Wills, lately appointed commander 
in the London^ desires, on account of the death of his wife and for 
other reasons, that his place may be supplied by another ; the post 
is offered to Mr. Prowd, who willingly accepts it ; but resolution 
herein is deferred, (i /.) 



A Court of Committees, January 12, 1641 {Cotirt Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 385). 

The Governor acquaints the Court that he received two letters 
from Lord Goring, directing him to wait upon the King at White- 
hall yesterday afternoon. He went accompanied by the Deputy 
and Mr. Kerridge, and Lord Goring presented them to His 
Majesty, who said that he had heard that the Company intended 
to present a petition to Parliament against Endymion Porter : that 
Mr. Porter had ' nothing to doe in the busines, his name onely 
being used, and that what was done was His Majesties act': he 
therefore advised them not to exhibit any such petition. The 
Governor replied that he feared it was too late, the petition having 
been delivered ' to a Parlyament man ' last Friday night to be 
presented to the House. The King said it was not too late, as it 
had not been read ; and that if it were not withdrawn ' hee must 
and would owne the busines ', for Mr. Porter had nothing to do 
with it. He added that ' he had in agitacion a round busines con- 
cerning them, and without him they could never gett a penny '. 
Mr. Porter, being called in, utterly denied having received a farthing 
of the money returned ; after which the King left them. On coming 
away they sent to Alderman Soame ^ to recall the petition, in 
order to delay the reading for a time. This action is now approved 
by the Court. The Governor then states that he intends presently 
to go again to the King and tell him that, if the Company has not 

* Thomas Soame was the senior M.P. for the City of London. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY J31 

speedy satisfaction from the Dutch and countenance from His 
Majesty, then the recalling of the petition will cause great disturb- 
ance and very much dishearten the adventurers, (i^ />/>.) 

A Court of Committees, January 13, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 386). 

The Governor moves that the generality be told of the with- 
drawal of the petition to Parliament, as they had decreed its 
presentation ; a general court is accordingly appointed to be held 
next Friday afternoon, when it will be known whether the petition 
has been recalled or not. It is also agreed that a competent 
number of Committees shall attend the King about this and the 
intention of Mr. Courteene to dispeed more ships this spring. 
Roger Kilvert, a Spanish merchant, appears and states that his 
father-in-law, Sir John Watts, has asked him to present a petition 
to Parliament against the Company concerning the estate of 
Captain Matthew Mooreton, who died commander of the Great 
James, but he thought fit first to ascertain the pleasure of the 
Court. He is thanked for his courtesy and told of some particular 
passages in this business, and offered to be shown the books to see 
if the Company has not behaved rightly, but these he refuses to 
examine. On the petition of Richard Swinglehurst, who twelve 
months ago was appointed Warehousekeeper at the Exchange and 
has only received satisfaction for six months of that time, his 
salary is fixed at 120/. per annum to begin from last Midsummer. 
Consideration of the appointment of a master for the William is 
deferred until next P'^riday. The petition of Elizabeth, widow of 
John Powell, who died near Masulipatam, is read and referred to 
Messrs. Middleton and Massingbird. William Cary's petition for 
redress of wrongs suffered in the Indies is referred to Messrs. Trott 
and Bludworth. John Polleyn, late master's mate in the Reforma- 
tion, to be paid 22/. for pepper. (2 //.) 

A General Court, January 15, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 389). 

Mr. Governor expresses sorrow that so few are present, and 
reports that, according to the order of the last General Court, the 
Company's petition concerning the piracy committed by Cobb and 

K a 



133 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Ayres in the Red Sea, and also the remonstrance about other 
grievances, were exhibited to the House of Commons, but have 
since, in accordance with directions given, been withdrawn for 
a time ; the reasons for this he may not divulge to the whole 
court, but if six or more of the generality are nominated he will 
inform them. He desires the meeting to give its approbation and 
consent to this withdrawal, and to rest confident that nothing shall 
be done to damage the Company. Thereupon the withdrawal of 
the petition is generally consented to in the expectation of a ' happy 
issue', (i /.) 

A Court of Committees, January i8, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 390). 

John Prowd is elected master of the Londo7t in place of Captain 
Wills, and desired to use all possible expedition in getting his ship 
ready. Thomas Godfry is chosen master of the William for Bantam 
at a salary of 7/. per month, and admonished not to be too severe 
in his command. The Governor proposes that the King should be 
informed that the discouragements of the Company so dishearten 
the adventurers that the trade is likely to come to a standstill. 
Much dispute ensues, and it is advocated that a verbal remonstrance 
be made to the King of the ' ill conceyte ' of the generality at the 
Company's petition being withdrawn from Parliament ; of the 
desire that His Majesty will be pleased to stay Mr. Courteene's 
ships now being prepared for the Indies ; that satisfaction may be 
had from the Dutch for former injuries and a ' reglement ' made for 
the future ; and that the imposts now paid for East India com- 
modities may be reduced. After long debate it is resolved, as 
most of the Company's grievances will be agitated in the House of 
Commons (but not for some time, because of the weighty affairs 
now in hand), to draw up a short petition to the King, begging him 
to stay Mr. Courteene's ships, at the same time stating that, as the 
latter has permission to bring home his remains, the Company does 
not doubt but by treaty with him to arrive at an accommodation, it 
being supposed that he has less now in the Indies than he may 
have hereafter. (i| //.) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 133 

A Court of Committees, January 20, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 391). 

The petition and remonstrance to the King for stay of 
Mr. Courteene's ships is read and, after debate, ordered to be 
engrossed and presented. On information that after preparation of 
the ships to be dispatched this spring the Company will be indebted 
100,000/. over and above its estate in the kingdom, the Court pro- 
poses, in order to uphold its credit and secure its estate abroad, to 
follow the course pursued last year and cause a policy for 100,000/. 
to be drawn up upon the ships abroad, giving one and a half per 
cent, on the same conditions as in the former policy ; and as at the 
underwriting of the last there was some irregularity, some of the 
adventurers underwriting for five times more than their stock, it is 
resolved that when the present policy is drawn up it shall be 
brought into court so that all adventurers desirous of underwriting 
in it can do so, provided they do not underwrite for more than half 
their stock, and no man for above 3,000/. Sir Henry Garway and 
his eldest son, Henry, are accepted as security for cloves. A warrant 
for 127 barrels of powder from the King's store at 5/. per barrel is 
ordered to be obtained from the Lords to the Officers of the 
Ordnance to supply the Company's four ships. Mr. Sherborne 
presents an account of 20/. given to him for the Company's occasions 
and another of 9/. i^s. 6d.; the latter sum is ordered to be paid 
him. (li //.) 

A Court of Committees, January 25, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 393). 

The Governor acquaints the Court that he, with the Deputy, 
Alderman Gayre, and Messrs. Kerridge and Methwold, waited on 
the King last Friday with the Company's petition and remonstrance 
about the stay of Mr. Courteene's ships. His Majesty said that he 
would read them, speak with Mr. Courteene, and signify his pleasure 
therein by Mr. Secretary Vane. The Governor told the King of the 
withdrawal from Parliament of the Company's petition, and that 
the General Court was willing to suspend it for a time. His Majesty 
thanked them and withdrew. Endymion Porter then came and 
thanked them, ' protesting and voweing hee had never penny 



134 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

adventure nor pennyworth by the voyage.' The Governor told 
him the gist of the present petition, and he acknowledged that he 
' was there an adventurer 3,000/.', that he thought very well of their 
proposition, and would further it as much as he could. The 
Governor further reports that they conferred with Lord Cottington 
at Whitehall about the pepper money, when His Lordship said 
that he could not satisfy them now, but would do so as soon as 
possible. The London in leaving the dock having ' gott a brush in 
her keele ', she is ordered to be brought back, searched, and mended ; 
and, as now she cannot be fitted for Surat, it is resolved that the 
William shall go there, and the London and the Mary to Bantam. 
(i|/A) 

A Court of Committees, January 27, 1641 [Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 394). 

The general letters from Bantam brought by the Caesar are read, 
and the advice of the death of the President, George Muschampe, 
and of many other factors considered. The Court calls to mind 
those formerly employed there, and understanding by the said 
letters that Aaron Baker has been elected President, approves of 
this choice, perceiving that he is an able and experienced merchant 
well fitted for the post ; but as by the said letters he desires to 
return to England (his contracted time being expired) because of 
the death of his father (from whom he inherits good means of liveli- 
hood), the Court takes into consideration who shall succeed him in 
case he refuses to remain ; Gerald Pinson, a former President at 
Bantam, and John Hunter, an able man, are nominated ; but resolu- 
tion is deferred. Meanwhile, to encourage and invite Mr. Baker to 
remain two or three years longer, the salary of 30c/. per annum, 
given to the late President, is conferred upon him, to begin from 
the expiration of his contracted time and to continue during his 
employment. The Court hearing that many petitions are to be 
presented in Parliament against the Company by its former servants 
and others, and desiring rather to settle these in a fair and friendly 
manner, leaves it to the Governor to appoint some special time to 
hear these grievances ; he decides that this shall be done on the 
afternoons when no courts are held, and the first petition to be 
considered shall be from the father of the late Thomas Joyce, 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 135 

a factor of the Company, and so all others by turns. Mr. Smith- 
wick's motion for remission of the brokes charged upon his sub- 
scription in the Second and Third Voyages (he pretending that the 
preamble does not warrant them) is left to the consideration of the 
next General Court. Samuel Crispe and James Martyn accepted 
as security for dust of pepper. The Court, recognizing that the 
King and the Lords will have to be waited on many times in con- 
nexion with the grievances lately set forth^ resolves to appoint 
some fit persons, to whom power shall be given not only to 
negotiate but to agree to and conclude such propositions as shall 
be made by His Majesty or by the State for composing and deter- 
mining these matters. After serious consideration, the Governor, 
the Deputy, Sir Henry Garway, Alderman Gayre, Messrs. Holloway, 
Ashwell, Kerridge, Methwold, and Massingbird are nominated to 
attend the King and the Lords, with full power for any five, or the 
greater number of them, to conclude and agree to whatever they 
shall think fit, and to ratify and confirm the same as though it 
were the act of the Court of Committees. Richard Davies to be 
paid at the rate of 4/. a ship for piloting the Company's vessels 
from Biackwall to Erith or Gravesend, and if he pilots any from 
thence to the Downs he is to be paid the same as Merrytt was 
formerly. Davies is given 2/. for his attendance to carry down the 
Londoft to Erith, which by her accident at launching was prevented, 
and 8/. for piloting the Mary and the William to Erith. The 
dispute between Sir Dudley Diggs and the Company is referred to 
Messrs. Ashwell and Middleton. Robert Bateman re-assigns and 
transfers to Thomas Smithwick, Senior, 1,600/. adventure and 
profit in the Third Joint Stock, upon which is ' accompted divided ' 
the principal, 1,600/.; also a further sum of 300/. on which the 
principal is likewise ' accompted to bee divided '. (3I pp.) 

A Court of Committees, January 29, 1641 {Court Booky 
vol. xvii, p. 398). 

Mr. Styles is desired to mediate with Mr. Holland, of the Navy, 
concerning payment for some timber. The Governor relates that, 
accompanied by the Deputy, Sir Henry Garway, and others, he 
waited on Mr. Secretary Vane at Whitehall, according to appoint- 
ment, to receive an answer to the Company's petition and remon- 



736 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

strance concerning the stay of Mr. Courteene's ships, and to 
understand the certainty of the advice from Holland of an agree- 
ment reported to have been concluded for satisfaction for the 
injuries done to the Company by the Dutch. Secretary Vane told 
them that according to the King's direction he had sent a copy of 
the petition and remonstrance to Mr. Courteene, from whom he 
expected a speedy answer ; he therefore requested that Mr. Sher- 
burne should come to him in two or three days, when he should be 
informed of it, he himself having no doubt that upon Mr. Courteene 
and the Company conferring, some way would be found of com- 
posing their differences. Concerning the agreement or sum of 
money pretended to have been offered by the Dutch, Mr. Secretary 
seemed to know nothing, but was confident, from a letter lately 
received from Sir William Boswell, that no such offer had been 
made, but that the matter is still in dispute. Upon this the 
Governor and his colleagues set forth how advantageous the money 
would be to the Company, even if it fell far short of the losses 
sustained, if it could be paid in some reasonable time, as it would 
help to provision the ships intended for dispatch and also help to 
pay some part of the Company's debt ; but that if the agreement 
were made and the money not paid into the Company's handSj it 
would so dishearten the adventurers that they would draw home 
the estate from abroad and not seek to continue the trade by a new 
subscription, which would be a great loss to His Majesty and 
utterly ruin the trade itself This being a matter of no small con- 
sequence, the Governor and his colleagues doubted not but that the 
King and State would take it into consideration. Hereupon 
Secretary Vane asked whether in the time of the late Lord 
Treasurer, the Earl of Portland, the Company had not offered to 
accept 50,000/. from the Dutch in settlement of all differences ; 
this the Governor denied, but remembered some such proposition 
being made but not consented unto ; and observing what was 
intended and that Mr. Secretary was cautious on this point, and 
being confident that no such agreement as was reported was yet 
made, he entreated His Honour to be mindful of the Company in 
this particular and also as regards the petition and remonstrance, 
and departed. Upon this relation the Court thinks fit to ascertain 
whether the sum advised has been offered, and directs that 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 137 

Mr. Whittacres be desired to inquire and certify as to the amount, 
and that meanwhile no demands or ofifers of acceptance be made of 
any sum from the Dutch. The petition of Rice Williams to the 
Lords of the Council against the Company ^ is read ; the Court 
orders the account presented to their Lordships on Rice's former 
complaint to be shown to them again, it being the only answer the 
Company can make. George Oxenden being specially recommended 
in the general letters from Surat, and by Mr. Methwold for ' his 
civill carriage and expert knowledge in the Industan language ', is 
entertained as a factor for Surat at 25/. per annum, to be increased 
5/. yearly as long as he remains in the service. The estate of 
Anthony Ott is to be paid to John Pollen. Sir Henry Garway 
reports that he has been told of several parcels of pepper and cloves 
landed from the Caesar in the Downs, besides the goods allowed 
the master and men as private trade ; as this is prohibited by 
charterparty. Sir Henry desires the Court to take it into considera- 
tion. Edward Cottismore, who married John Willoughby's widow, 
is, on application, ordered to be paid the remainder of Willoughby's 
estate, 2^61. gs. yd., now in the Company's hands. (3^ p/>.) 

Richard Carmarden, Surveyor-General of Customs, 
TO Endymion Porter, January 29, 1641 {Public Record Office : 
Dom. Chas. /, vol. cccclxxvi. No. 96). 

The overture Clovell and Tindale have made you is of such 
consequence, being well understood and duly managed, as may make 
our Sovereign never to be in want of money, but rather to lend to his 
subjects. It is worth ten times the East India trade, for by that 
the King has but 30,000/. per annum, both inwards and outwards. 
I presume you need not be pressed to put it on foot, the benefit 
will be so great, (i /.) 

Warrant for Gunpowder, January 31, 1641 {Public Record 
Office : Dom. Chas. /, vol. cccclxxvi, No. 103). 

Warrant of the Commissioners for Gunpowder to Mountjoy, 
Earl of Newport, to issue 127 barrels of gunpowder at 5/. per barrel 
for the use of the East India Company. [\ p.) 

' See the calendar of House of Lords papers given in the Fourth Report of the Hist. 
MSS. Commission, p. 45. 



138 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, February 3, 1641 [Court Booh^ 
vol. xvii, p. 401). 

Mr. Acton's bill of 6/. 13J. /\d. for law causes to be paid. 
Mr. Rilston is directed to enter the Caesar (lately returned from 
Bantam) at the Custom-house, and to send lighters down to Erith 
by next Monday to receive her goods. Kerridge and Davies are 
desired to go aboard and see her break bulk ; and, to prevent the 
embezzlement of anything, three or four of the Company's porters 
are to be sent to guard her hold. John Spiller is appointed land- 
purser for her clearing. A question is raised as to whether Captain 
Jourdaine has performed the conditions of his charterparty, for 
though the ship arrived safely, yet it is thought that she ran great 
danger on the voyage, because through the ill stowing of her cargo 
the guns could not have been used in the event of an attack ; 
in order to be fully satisfied on this point the Court directs that 
three or four of the most able Trinity men shall be asked to board 
the Caesar at Erith, to examine the stowage of her goods and to 
report ; and Kerridge, Holloway, Captain Wills, and Captain Mynors 
are desired to accompany them. It is proposed to put off the 
Company's silk by division, viz. to take out one half upon stock, 
to be valued at \%l. \os. per hundred, and to bring in ready money 
for the other half at \']s. per lb. at six and six months to rebate 
within a fortnight ; this is approved of by all present, but left for 
further consideration. Mary, widow of Jeremy Lanken in the 
Jewel, who was drowned, and William Eldred, a mariner, maimed 
in the Company's service, are given los. each from the poor-box. 
(1 5 /A) 

A Court of Committees, February 5, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 408). 

Cordage to be provided for the ships. Dispute as to the manner 
of disposing of the silk and other commodities ; finally it is resolved 
to call a general court next Wednesday afternoon. Sir Bayneham 
Throgmorton and the executors of the late Lady Dale demand the 
remainder of Sir Thomas Dale's estate and adventure now in the 
Company's hands, and read a certificate made in Chancery by 
Samuel Aldersey and John Skinner regarding what is due. The 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 139 

Court, intending to consider the brokes charged upon the account, 
desires the executors to write down their requests, when, after 
examination, just satisfaction shall be made. The dividend 
of calicoes which they demand is directed to be delivered de bene 
esse} without prejudice to either party until the account and the 
executors' demands have been examined and agreed upon. Upon 
examination of the difference in question between the Company and 
the late Thomas Joyce, a factor, it is found by the accounts that 
Joyce, notwithstanding the pretences of his father and executor, 
is so indebted to the Company that little or nothing is due to him 
but certain jewels, rings, &c. [list given]. In order to settle this 
business the Court directs that all the jewels except the first on the 
list be delivered to the father and executor of Joyce, ' the faire 
amberchee ' ^ being thought no part of his estate, as it was received 
in return for a present given on behalf of the Company by Joyce 
to the King of Gulcondah,^ which cost the Company 4,00c/. 
Before delivery of the said jewels a general release is to be given by 
both parties. The wages at Blackwall for the week ending the 
3rd of February, amounting to 109/. 14^-. 9^., are ordered to be 
paid, {ilpp) 

A Court of Committees, February 10, 1641 {Court Booh, 
vol. xvii, p. 403). 

William Hurt, appointed purser in the Discovery, and John Perkyns, 
purser in the London, are ordered to change places. Notice to be 
given to all masters of ships and to the factors in India that hence- 
forth the Company's goods are to be stowed ' abaft the mast ' (as 
Captain Jourdayne did his in the Caesar) which place was kept 
formerly for private trade. Philip Bearden to be paid 10/., the 
remainder of the estate of his kinsman, Abraham Jones, whose 
executor he is. Consideration had of the manner in which the 
Company's goods are to be sold to-morrow at the court of sales. 

' An old law term. ' Provisionally ' expresses its meaning here. 

^ Described in the list as ' one faire amberchee [Hind, ambarcha, a neck ornament 
filled with amber] sett with dyamonds, rubyes, and emeralds on both sides, whereof one 
large crackt dyamond in the middest of it, all fastned to a small gold chayne hung with 
rubyes and eleven pearles, whereof four are loose '. 

' During the mission to Golconda which resulted in the grant known as ' the Golden 
Farman' (Feb. 1634). 



140 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

After much argument it is resolved to sell the silk by the candle, 
fifty bales a parcel, at i ']s. per lb. at six and six months from the 
last day of this month, and to discount by then one-half: cloves 
to be sold at ^s. per lb. sifted, twenty-five hogsheads in a parcel, 
at three six months from the last of this month : pepper, lOo bags 
in a parcel, at i8<^. per lb., sifted, at four six months from next 
Lady Day : saltpetre, of which there are about fifty or sixty tons, 
to be sold at 4/. los. per hundred at a year from the last of February, 
all together, not in parcels: dust of indigo at i^d. per lb. at three 
six months : and cotton wool at ^d. per lb. at six months from the 
aforesaid time. The Court, being told of the illness of Mr. Cappur, 
gives him 10/. ' as a token of their loves '. {i\pp.) 

A General Court, February 10, 1641 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 405). 

The Governor states that this court has been called principally 
to be informed of the safe arrival of the Caesar, the first ship 
freighted by the Company ; that she has made a quicker voyage 
than any of the Company's ships, having been less than eleven 
months ; for this all should return humble and hearty thanks to God 
in such a manner as to receive a continuance of His blessings upon 
their future labours. A second cause for thankfulness is the 
arrival of the seventy chests of coral and 30,000 rials of eight in 
the Rainbotv from Leghorn, the proceeds of the pepper sent there ; 
this comes most opportunely to furnish the ships ready to be dis- 
peeded to the Indies. The Governor then gives the prices and 
times arranged by the Committees at their last meeting for sale 
of the remaining goods, and desires the court to consider and 
speak freely if a more advantageous arrangement is thought of. 
After debate the prices and times are approved, and it is 
resolved to propose them at the court of sales to be held 
to-morrow. A proposal is made to acquaint Parliament with the 
discouragements caused by Mr. Courteene being allowed to trade 
to the Indies contrary to the Company's patent, and with the 
' aggrievances ' inflicted by the Dutch ; but the Governor replies 
that the Committees have already presented a petition and re- 
monstrance on these subjects, to which they must await a timely 
answer. Mr. Smithwick humbly requests that the brokes on his 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 141 

adventure in the Second and Third Voyages may be reduced from 
12/. to 8/. per cent., which will only cost the Company about 100/. 
The Court, for guidance, causes many orders to be read ; when one 
of the generality asks who is to pay if Smithwick's request be 
granted, as every one in these Voyages has received his money. 
To this no reply is made ; and as the Court is inclined to favour 
Smithwick, it is resolved that between this and the next general 
court the Accountant shall ascertain who else is in brokes upon 
these Voyages and for how much, and report, when Smithwick's 
request shall be further considered. (3//-) 

A General Court of Sales, February ii, 1641 {Court 
Book^ vol. xvii, p. 410). 

Sale of Jambi pepper, cotton wool, cloves, calicoes, Legee, Ardas, 
and Cannaree silk, with prices and names of purchasers, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees, February 12, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 411). 

William Middleton and Thomas Russell accepted as securities 
for silk bought by Middleton at the last court of sales. To pre- 
vent all disputes between buyers of the several lots of silk, it is 
agreed that each lot shall be drawn for ; and that the usual 
allowance shall be made for defective silk, but only if it be opened 
in the Company's warehouse. The William being ready to go to 
Gravesend and the Downs, her mariners are to be paid their imprest 
money. Defective calicoes bought by James Martyn to be de- 
livered, he promising to discount for them on receipt. Thomas 
Cooke, steward of the London, and James Johnson, steward of the 
Discovery, wishing to be excused from serving, William Netlam 
and John Sweete are appointed in their stead. John Robins, 
specially recommended by the Lord Mayor and several Com- 
mittees, is entertained as steward's mate's mate in the Mary 
at 10s. per month. Alderman Adams recommends his former 
servant, Thomas Hill, for entertainment as a factor at Surat. 
Some objection is raised on the ground that Hill is married ; that 
this employment is desired because of his insolvency ; and that the 
Court has already found the inconvenience of employing such 
persons, because of the importunities both of their wives and 



142 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

creditors for relief; but the Alderman replying that neither shall 
trouble the Company, Hill is entertained at 25/. per annum, to rise 
5/. yearly for seven years or for so long as he shall be employed. 
Mr. Fotherby is directed to pay the last week's wages of 170/. 
to the workmen at Blackwall. Roger Farly, entertained as a factor 
for Bantam, tenders as his security his uncle, Humphrey Farly. 
Owen Butt, executor to Robert Tanfield, who in his turn was 
executor to Sir Henry Robinson, transfers to William Cockayne 
62/. lOj". adventure and profits in the Third Joint Stock, the estate 
due to Tristram Escott in the name of Sir Henry Robinson. 
William Johnson, who has served the Company twenty years and 
is now in the London, to be paid 3/. due to him from Robert 
Richardson, who is in the Indies. izPP-) 

Robert Reade in Paris to Endymion Porter, February 
^, 1641 [Public Record Office: Dom. Chas. /, vol. cccclxxvii, 

No. 23). 

Since my coming into these parts I had advice that one of the 
ships was returned from India, where there was an adventure in my 
name. I desire you, whatever the benefit shall be, to preserve 
it till I shall have the happiness to wait on you myself, or till with 
your good advice it may be otherwise disposed of 

A Court of Committees, February 17, 1641 {Court Book. 
vol. xvii, p. 415). 

Upon information that Richard Wild, a former President at 
Surat, is willing to refer the difference between himself and the 
Company to certain Committees rather than petition Parliament, 
the Court, remembering that Wild has already given a general 
release, and that everything in this business has been done upon 
good grounds, resolves to leave him to take what course he thinks 
fit. Mr. Acton's bill of 9/. for law causes to be paid. The Governor 
relates what happened at the conference he, the Deputy, and some 
of the Committees had last Monday with Secretary Vane about 
Mr. Courteene's business, when the only answer they received was 
that as yet Courteene had given no reply, but had promised to do 
so by to-day ; and that he had complained of the remonstrance 
against him delivered in Parliament. Secretary Vane wished the 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 343 

Governor and the others to be at Whitehall on Wednesday after- 
noon to meet Mr. Courteene, when it is to be hoped some agree- 
ment may be made. The Deputy, Alderman Gayre, and others 
are desired to accompany the Governor to give their opinions 
on such propositions as shall be put to them either by Secretary 
Vane or Mr. Courteene. The Governor reports that some conver- 
sation was had about the composition and offer made by the Dutch, 
when it was asked whether the Company had resolved to fix upon 
a sum ; to this the Deputy replied that though he had no warrant 
or authority from the Company, yet he would be bold and ' adven- 
ture a chiding ' by saying that if through the King's favour the 
Company should receive 50,000/. from the Dutch and a ' reglement ' 
should be settled for the future, he thought it would be acceptable ; 
in which opinion the Governor and Committees concurred. Where- 
upon Mr. Secretary declared that understanding thus much he had 
some ground to go upon, and would speak to the King on this 
matter at the first fitting opportunity, and do his best for the Com- 
pany ; at the same time affirming that notwithstanding reports 
this business is not so advanced as is thought. It being now put 
to the meeting whether this sum should be accepted if it is to cover 
the depredations committed by Cobb and Ayres, reply is made that 
' the Company wilbee content to involve the same for soe much as 
is past ; but if by that occasion any new trouble or charge hath or 
shall arise (of which the Company hath yett noe knowledge) that 
then the Company . . . shall expect satisfaccion over and above the 
said somme for the damage they have or shall receive from such 
persons as have bin the cause and procurers thereof. The Court 
thinking that the reasons expressed in the remonstrance which the 
Company caused to be printed and dedicated to Parliament in i62(S 
would, if reprinted, be of great advantage, Mr. Muns (whose work 
it was) is entreated to revise the ' said booke ', make such alterations 
and additions as he shall thinkfit, considering theCompany'soccasions 
and the present state of its trade, and cause 400 or 500 copies to 
be printed and delivered to Parliament to show the reasons for up- 
holding the East India trade. Mr. Cotton is re-engaged as preacher 
in the London at the same salary as before, viz. 50/. per annum with 
10/. to buy books ; he is also granted remission of freight on some 
indigo he brought home as private trade, but at the same time 



144 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

reproved for dealing in this commodity, which should be the Com- 
pany's only ; he pleads ignorance and promises not to offend again. 
The account of Richard Swinglehurst, audited by Markham, is 
allowed, and an excess of ll. lOi-. 6d. is ordered to be paid ; also 
50/. more upon account, but the Court directs that henceforth 
no man is to receive money upon account, but is to be paid by the 
Treasurer. Jeremy Rawsterne, Edmund Harvy, Edmund Sleigh, 
Henry Rapier, William Cockayne, Richard Middleton, William 
Methwold, and John Langly accepted as securities for silk. Edmund 
Chambers to be paid 61. for carrying Committees to and from 
Erith. (3i//.) 

A Court of Committees, February 20, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 420). 

Mr. Pinson informs the Court that Thomas Ivy brought in the 
Thomas from Masulipatam to Bantam about 20,000 rials of eight as 
private trade in partnership for himself and Andrew Coggan, part 
of which Ivy invested at Bantam, and the remainder he took to 
Macassar. The lading of the Thomas for the Company's account 
was 11,000 rials of eight. Pinson is requested to write down this 
information, and 100/. is ordered to be paid him on account of his 
wages, and another 100/. when he delivers the written information. 

A Court of Committees, February 19, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 418). 

Henry, son of the late William Robinson, is admitted to the 
freedom of the Company by patrimony. A bill of exchange for 
250/. from William Newman from Ireland, payable to Francis Roe 
in Cheapside, is ordered to be paid. Richard and Robert Glover 
accepted as securities for pepper and cotton wool. The William 
being ready to go to Gravesend, her commander, Mr. Godfry, is 
desired to take her there at the first opportunity ; the services 
of Davies, the pilot, are requisitioned. John Stamford, entertained 
as a factor for Surat, tenders as his security Mr. George Longe, 
merchant. After some debate the Governor, Sir Henry Garway, 
and Mr. Methwold are desired to wait on the Lord Treasurer, 
Lord Cottington, and Secretary Vane concerning Mr. Courteene's 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 145 

business, and to answer all objections made by him as they shall 
think fit and advantageous to the Company. The petition of 
Thomas Collett, one of the legatees of Jeremy Harrison, who died 
in the Indies, is referred to Messrs. Francklyn and Massingbird. 
Mr. Fotherby is to receive 41/. los. to pay a week's wages at 
Blackwall. {i^ pp.) 

A Court of Committees, February 24, 1641 (Coi^rt Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 420). 

It is resolved to send three chests of rials in the William, three 
in the Mary, sixteen in the London, and eight in the Discovery. 
Captain Mynors is allowed ten tons of water more than is cus- 
tomary. The Governor reports that with Sir Henry Garway and 
Mr. Methwold he waited on the Lords last Friday afternoon accord- 
ing to direction. They met Mr, Courteene, who was asked by 
Their Lordships if he had made any answer to the Company's 
petition and remonstrance. He replied that he had not done so in 
writing, but that he was willing to confer with the Company about 
the difference in question ; he also intimated his ' forwardnesse ' to 
stay his intended ships, now being prepared, and to consent to 
a fitting accommodation. Their Lordships, after hearing from the 
Committees the prejudice and inconveniencies which have been and 
will be caused to the Company if Mr. Courteene's trading to the 
Indies be not speedily prevented, directed him to give a written 
answer to the petition and remonstrance ' betwixt this and Wed- 
nesday next ', and to propose what in his opinion would bring this 
business to a speedy conclusion ; which he promised to do. This 
being the appointed afternoon, the Governor desires the attendance 
of the Committees at the conference. He further relates that not- 
withstanding Their Lordships' directions and the seeming content 
of Mr. Courteene, yet he dispatched one of his ships, the Paradox, 
from the Downs a day or two ago. Captain Crane sends his 
solicitor, Mr. Bland, to demand his suit of tapestry hangings, offer- 
ing to refer the claims made by the Company to some indifferent 
arbitrator, but if this is refused he threatens to take some other 
course to obtain satisfaction. After consulting Mr. Methwold and 
Mr. Markham the Court proposes to Mr. Bland that a just account 
should be drawn up of what custom the Company has paid for the 



146 COURT MINUTES, ETC.. OF THE 

said hangings, which if Captain Crane will refund, order shall be 
given for delivery of the tapestry, and consideration had of the 
other differences in question. An order is read from the Court of 
Exchequer concerning the difference between Sir Nicholas Crispe 
and the executors of Abel Druce, a factor, in which the Company 
is enjoined to pay loo/. belonging to the estate of the said Druce ; 
direction is given to pay the same if it be found in the Company's 
keeping. Mr. Middleton offers to buy 700 bags of pepper at 
iSd. per lb. at five six months from the last of March next ; the 
Court, though considering it a fair offer, yet to avoid all complaints 
directs that a court of sales be held next Saturday morning, when 
Mr. Middleton's offer shall be put to the generality. The com- 
plaints which Richard Wild intends to present to Parliament having 
come accidentally into the hands of the Company's Secretary arc 
now read ; after consideration it is resolved that all the documents 
in this case shall be looked out by next Friday. The request 
of Mr. Cotton that he may have 12/. gratification as at his last 
entertainment and that 5/. may, as before, be advanced quarterly 
out of his salary to his wife, beginning from Michaelmas, is granted. 
(3 /A) 

'A Meeting with Mr. Courteene and other his 
Freinds,' February 24, 1641 (Cairt Book, vol. xvii, p. 423). 

Mr. Governor relates the proceedings which have led up to the 
present meeting, and desires Mr. Courteene to bring forward his 
proposals. Mr. Courteene replies that he was never averse from 
' conjoyning ' with the Company ; about three years ago a pro- 
position to that effect was made by Sir Paul Pindar, but the 
Company refused to listen to it ; and since then he has prosecuted 
the business, the necessity of his affairs forcing him. The Governor 
replies that he knows not what was done then, but since that time 
Mr. Courteene has had good returns and in all probability his two 
ships now in the East could bring home the most part of his estate ; 
therefore if the Company and he can agree to bring home what 
remains, there would be no need for him to dispatch any more 
ships ; yet during this treaty he has sent out a pinnace, which is 
prejudicial and disheartening to the adventurers; also his com- 
manders and agents have infringed their commission and entrenched 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 147 

upon the Company's privileges in settling a factory at Rajahpore, 
and by going to other prohibited places. This Captain Hall, who 
performed that service, seems to excuse ; and it not being thought 
part of the present business, the dispute is stopped. With regard 
to the Paradox^ Mr. Courteene affirms that he meant no ill to any 
man, but everyone must make the best of his own ; he does not 
intend to perpetuate the trade ; and the pinnace was sent specially 
to seek Captain Weddall and his consort, of whom there is some 
question. Mr. Deputy remarks that either Mr. Courteene or the 
Company must give up the trade, and asks the former to state his 
demands. Thereupon Mr. Courteene replies that if the Company 
will give him his principal money laid out, with interest for the 
same, and his charges, then he will show his books, resign, and 
leave all to the Company, and freely refer himself to them for all 
his pains in this business. Alderman Gayre and other Committees 
reply that if this is his proposal the treaty is ended ; but if on the 
other hand he will deliver to the Company's factors and servants 
in India all his estate there, it shall be brought home by freight, 
or else he shall be allowed for it by the dollar ; and the Company 
will also take over his ship and all he is sending in her upon 
valuable consideration. These proposals Mr. Courteene promises 
to consider. {2 pp.) 

A Court of Committees, February 26, 1641 (Coiirt Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 425). 

At the request of Sir Nicholas Crispe, his son-in-law, Thomas 
Fownes, is admitted to the freedom of the Company. Rowland, 
son of Rowland Wilson, is also admitted by patrimony. John 
Holmes, cordwainer and citizen of London, is accepted as security 
for Thomas Maulthus, purser in the Williajn. An order from the 
Exchequer made in the cause in dispute between Mr. Abraham 
Chamberleyne and the legatees of the late Mr. Askew is read, 
in which the Company is ordered to pay to the legatees the legacies 
left to them by the said Askew ; but, no particular sum being 
mentioned, Mr. Cole, one of the legatees, is advised to confer with 
Mr. Acton, the Company's solicitor, and to procure an order 
naming the particular sums due, when the Company will be ready 
and willing to pay the same. Thomas Muffett to be paid 57/. for 

L 3 



148 COURT MINUTES, ETC, OF THE 

30,000 reeds at 38^. per thousand. Motion is made that as 
Mr. Courteene has again dispeeded a ship to the Indies and is likely 
to send another, notwithstanding the Company's endeavours to stop 
him, that the King and State shall be moved to require him to give 
' good caution ' to the Company that none of his ships shall 
commit such depredations as they did formerly. John Wriothesly, 
recommended by Mr. Sergeant Clarke for entertainment for the 
Indies, is rejected as too young. A sum of 93/. 2s. from 
Skibbowe's estate is ordered to be paid to Mr. Methwold on 
behalf of ' Tapidas Chaune, Sheraffe V to whom it has been 
assigned by Gobull Gee, the original creditor. On hearing from 
Mr. Methwold of the many favours and good offices done to the 
Company by Signor Josepho Pinto Perrera, and of his request to be 
allowed a passage to England in one of the ships, he intending 
to lay in his own provisions, the Court desires Mr. Bowen to signify 
to Mr. Fremlyn in the general letters the Company's consent to the 
Signor's request. Francis Travell, ' a silkeman in Lumberstreete ', 
is accepted as security for John Stanford. On information that 
some of the buyers' bills are many months overdue, the Court 
orders that for the future ' noe man shalbee capeable to buy any 
of the Companies comodities that either doth or shall owe the 
Company mony after it is due two months, until their former bills 
are first satisfied and discharged '. A sum of 300/. to be given 
to Mr. Younge to pay wages, &c., at Blackwall and on board the 
ships. (3 pp.) 

A Court of Committees, February 27, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 427). 

William, son of John Willyams, is admitted to the freedom of the 
Company by patrimony. Andrew Riccard,- formerly apprenticed 
to Mr. John Watkins, is admitted by service. The Court being 
informed that the bales of Cannaree silk have not been delivered 
to the buyers in their due proportion, Messrs. Trott and Davies are 
desired to rectify this error. A court of sales is appointed for 
this afternoon. It is resolved by erection of hands to sell the 

^ Tapi Das Khan, a sarrdf (moneychanger or broker). The other name is probably 
meant for GopaljT. 

* Probably the future Sir Andrew Riccard, Governor of the East India and Turkey 
Companies. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 149 

pepper for transportation at idd. per lb., the impost to be reserved 
for the Company, at five six months from the ist of April next ; 
for the town it is to be sold at \M. per lb. garbled at two six 
months : cloves to be sold at 4^-. 6d. per lb. sifted, at four six months 
from the ist of April next, thirty barrels to a parcel, the Company 
to have the impost ; if garbled, at 6s. per lb. at three six months ; 
dust of indigo to be sold at \6d. per lb. at four six months from 
next Lady Day, ten barrels to a parcel : saltpetre at 4/. the cwt. 
at three six months from Lady Day. (i/.) 

A General Court of Sales, February 27, 1641 {Court 
Book^ vol. xvii, p. 428). 

Sale of pepper for transportation only, a forfeit of 5/. to be paid 
on every bag not transported. Price and names of purchasers, 

A Court of Committees, March i, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 430). 

On the death of John Cappur, who had charge of the canvas 
warehouse, John Spiller is appointed to his post and Markham 
is desired to examine Cappur's books and accounts. In order 
to make an end of the present Stock, it is unanimously agreed 
that all the Company's goods in the kingdom shall be sold to pay 
its debts ; and for what shall still be wanting the principal com- 
modities brought home in the expected ships shall be sold to satisfy 
all demands and leave an overplus to pay the interest for one year ; 
to send out no more stock upon this account, and to divide the 
remaining goods among the adventurers. This order having been 
formerly agreed to at a general court, it is resolved not to alter 
or revoke it ; yet if the Company has occasion to dispatch ships 
to fetch goods remaining in the Indies, as many freighted ships 
as shall be necessary can be sent out. Robert Manley is questioned 
concerning complaints against him received from Persia, and his 
demand for wages is referred for future consideration. On in- 
formation that Mr. Muschampe has been succeeded as President 
at Bantam by Aaron Baker, who is reported to be in 'a deepc 
consumption ', the Court, seeing that there is no one out there 
capable of filling his i^lacc, takes into consideration whom to send 



i5o COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

to act as second, and in the event of Mr. Baker's death to succeed 
as President. Mr. Pinson and Mr. Hunter are named ; but both 
excuse themselves on the ground of recent return after long absence 
from England, though Mr. Hunter offers to go in August or 
September by the next ships. Thereupon it is proposed that 
Ralph Cartwright, who has been long employed in the service and 
is specially recommended as an able man and a good accountant, 
and one who has cleared himself satisfactorily from all complaints, 
shall be appointed and go in the William, now designed for Bantam. 
He is much pleased with the Court's proposal and offers himself 
freely for this or any other employment. After debate his salary 
is settled at 1 20/. per annum ; on hearing this he asks that it may 
be made 200 marks, and in case Mr. Baker is dead on his arrival 
that he may succeed him as President. Both these requests are 
granted, and he is assured that if his services answer expectation 
he shall receive the same respect as other Presidents have had. At 
his desire it is agreed that his wife shall be given 40/. yearly from 
his salary for her maintenance. (3 pp.) 

A Court of Committees, March 3, 1641 (Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 433)- 

John Diggs, formerly apprenticed to Sir Henry Garway, Edwin 
Browne, formerly apprenticed to Mr. Humphrey Browne, and Henry 
Bernard, formerly apprenticed to Mr. William Bladwell, are all 
admitted to the freedom of the Company by service. Ferdinand 
Withers is accepted as security for his son Anthony, purser's mate 
in the Williavi ; and Edwin Chambers for his brother Thomas, 
purser's mate in the Mary. The William to be dispeeded to 
Gravesend next Monday ; meanwhile the chirurgion's chests and 
the three chests of rials are to be shipped aboard her. The Husband 
is directed to pay a bill of John Spiller's of 16/. loj-. \od., for diet 
supplied to the Committees who went to the unlading of the Caesar 
at Erith. At the request of John Pollen, master's mate in the 
William, Mr. Bowen is directed to write to the President at Bantam 
to permit Pollen to return in the said ship. Upon petition of 
William Johnson, boatswain's mate in the Discovery, his wife is 
ordered to be paid three months of his wages yearly during his 
absence, (i /.) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 151 

A Court of Committees, March 5, 1641 {Co^rt Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 435). 

William Honnywood, Robert Austen, John Langly, Richard 
Middleton, William Bateman, William Willyams, Andrew Riccard, 
William Cockayne, and Matthew Cradock are allowed as securities 
for pepper. A Portuguese gentleman,^ an inhabitant of ' Maccaw ' 
in China, who came to England with the Portuguese Ambassador, 
is allowed to take passage in the Mary for Bantam with three more 
of his countrymen and his two black servants, he to pay at the rate 
of 10/. each for diet. At the request of Sir John Wolstenholme 
Abraham Harrison is entertained as an attendant on Captain 
Mynors without wages. Mr. Governor relates that this morning he, 
Sir Henry Caraway, and Mr. Deputy waited on Sir Henry Vane, 
where they met Mr. Courteene, who had been summoned to appear. 
The latter still insisting upon his ' vast ' demands, he was told that 
the Company would have nothing to do with Captain Weddall's 
ships, his policy of assurance, his charge in setting out his ships, 
with anything that he has received by way of return, nor with his 
pretended estate in China ; but if he will treat about bringing home 
his remains by way of freight, or for the receipt of so much per 
dollar for what he shall deliver to the Company's factors, or for the 
Company's taking the Paradox and his ship and anything else he 
is now dispeeding, they will listen. Sir Henry Garraway advises 
that, as there is no hope of reconciliation nor of staying Mr. 
Courteene's ships, that he be let go his way, as it is not in the 
Company's power to struggle against him ; that the resolution to 
send out no more ships be adhered to ; that everything be wound 
up, and that they should not go to the Court any more. The 
Governor states that the remonstrance has been withdrawn for a 
time ; which though done without the consent of the Court, yet it is 
for the Company's good. This is agreed to. The Court directs that 
50/. be paid to Henry Oulton, who lately returned in the Caesar, 
and promises to hear the complaints against him next Monday. 
Joseph Gosson, minister in the Discovery, is granted remission of 
freight on calicoes and indigo. James Birkdale, late master's mate 

' His name is given in the Batavia Dagh Register for 1640-41 (pp. 432, 441) as 
" Anthonio Fialho Farera.' 



i5a COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

in the London, to be paid all wages and debts due to him, he to pay 
freight on any goods that he has. Laurence Cole, servant to James 
Younge, is admitted to the freedom of the Company by service. 
(2 pp) 

A Court of Committees, March 8, 1641 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 437)- 

John Stallon, who came home master in the Caesar under 
Captain Jourden, is proposed for chief master's mate in the London ; 
he accepts on condition that he receives 8/. per month, but the Court 
agrees to give him 6/. 13^. ^d. so long as he continues mate with 
Mr. Prowd, and on his becoming a master to give him more. Mr. 
Edward Cottismore accepted as security for Christopher Willoughby, 
now entertained as a factor for Bantam. {\p) 

A Court of Committees, March 10, 1641 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 437)- 

Mr. Samuel Vassal is accepted as security for Ralph Cartwright, 
and Mr. Thomas Barrow for George Oxenden. Robert Sainthill, 
William Garraway, Junior, Richard Davies, and Francis Roe 
accepted as securities for pepper. Mr. Francklin, having paid in 
1 ,000/. upon the 1 00 bags of pepper he bought, and promising to pay 
the remainder within eight days, is allowed to have the pepper. 

A Court of Committees, March 15, 1641 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 438). 

A warrant is ordered to be made out for the delivery of the 100 
bags of pepper bought by Mr. Methwold at the last court of sales, 
for which he paid in 1,185/. loj-. Upon petition, Silvester Grice, 
who has served the Company many years in India and only received 
1 7 J. per month, is given 10/. on his re-entertainment for the south- 
wards ; the Court agrees to allow his sister, Eliza Core, two months 
pay yearly from his wages, but advises him to leave a letter of 
attorney to this effect with Mr. Hurt. John Stanford, lately enter- 
tained as a factor at 35/. per annum ' standing wages ', is now to be 
allowed a yearly rise of 5/., as he has served the Company before, 
and is well recommended by the President and Council of Surat. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 153 

The following securities are accepted : Thomas Elkington, merchant, 
for John Syms, purser's mate in the Discovery ; Thomas Heynes, 
cutler, for his son Robert, purser's mate in the London \ Alderman 
Adams for his former servant, Thomas Hill, entertained as a factor ; 
and Valentine Markham, the Auditor, for his son Thomas, also 
entertained as a factor. Richard Swann, master's mate in the 
William, is granted leave to return in her, and the Secretary is 
directed to give him a note to that effect. Ralph Cartwright's bond 
is ordered to be cancelled, he having, as is usual, entered into a fresh 
bond on his re-entertainment. Stephen Bourman, George Long, 
John Hobson, James Gough, and William Barker are accepted as 
securities for pepper bought by Sir Christopher Clitherow. {i^pp-) 

A Court of Committees, March 17, 1641 [Court Book,vo\. 
xvii, p. 439). 

Forty bags of pepper to be delivered to William Robinson, he 
promising to satisfy the gentleman who wrote first for it, if the latter 
cannot be supplied. The following are accepted as securities for 
pepper : Nicholas Backhouse, Nicholas Penning, William Garraway, 
Junior, John Diggs, William Honnywood, Stephen Burton, Edward 
Prescott, Samuel Ellyott, Thomas Hodges, William Robinson, 
William Williams, and James and Robert Fenn. Richard Crane, 
executor to Sir Francis Crane, transfers to John Massingbird 250/. 
adventure in the Third Joint Stock, upon which is divided 25/. 
per hundred. Humphrey Atkins transfers to William Spurstowe 
154/. I'^s. 4d. adventure in the Third Joint Stock, upon which is 
divided 19/. 6s. 3<^. Benjamin Stone, cutler, is ordered to provide 
fifty swordblades for Surat at lOi'. per piece. At the request of 
Thomas Smithwick, a general court is to be summoned next 
Monday afternoon, (i p.) 

A Court of Committees, March 19, 1641 [Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 440). 

A petition is presented to the Court in the name of the mer- 
chants of London, signed by several Companies and intended for 
presentation to Parliament, to which the East India Company 
is desired to subscribe. The Court approving the petition, Messrs. 
Middleton and Mcthwold are desired to sign it in the name of the 



154 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Company. The Governor relates that Mr. Burlamachy told him 
this morning from Secretary Vane that the Company is to receive 
500,000 guilders from the Dutch. Mr. Burlamachy advised the 
Governor to attend Secretary Vane, accompanied by some other 
Committees, to conclude this business. After some consideration 
it is resolved, in regard to the present time and the condition of the 
Company's affairs, to accept this sum, although it is far short 
of what might justly be expected ; and the Governor, Sir Henry 
Garraway, Messrs. Ashwell, Kerridge, and Methwold are nominated 
to wait upon Secretary Vane and so to conclude this business that 
the Company may be assured of the aforesaid sum in retribution 
of the wrongs and injuries done by the Dutch : and because the 
exchange is now high they are to arrange for this money to ' bee 
paid them in bankes, from whence they may as they shall see 
cause and have occasion receive the same'. Mr. Sherborne is 
desired to acquaint Secretary Vane this afternoon with Mr. Burla- 
machy 's message and that the Governor and some other Committees 
will wait upon him when he shall appoint a time. The brother 
of the late William Gibson, a factor in Persia, desires an account 
of the latter's estate now in the Company's hands ; the Court, after 
telling him of the ill-service of the said William Gibson and of his 
debt to the Company at his death, directs that he be shown his 
brother's accounts, to which if any exception is made, good reason 
can be given to justify the Company. James Martin buys all the 
Company's dust of indigo at \6d. per lb. at three six months. 
Upon reading Mr. Smithwick's petition presented to Parliament 
against the Company,^ it is resolved to hold the general court 
appointed for next Monday on the following Wednesday in the 
afternoon. At the request of Edward Peirce, water-bailiff of 
London, the wages of his son Edward, a factor in India, who is well 
recommended in the general letters and by Mr. Methwold, are 
raised from 30/. to 60/. per annum for five years, to begin from the 
expiration of his contracted time, next Lady Day. The wages 
of William Jesson, another of the Company's servants in India, on 
the petition of his brother John are ordered to be increased 10/. 
yearly, until he receives 60/. (his present salary being 20/. per 
annum), if his services shall be required for so long. Captain 

'^ Not entered in the Commons' Journal. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 155 

Mynors is given 100 marks for bringing the Discovery into the 
Downs as her first port, and for freight paid for private trade 
brought home in the said ship. Francis Heath, haberdasher and 
citizen of London, is accepted as security for William Hurt, purser 
in the London. John, son of the late John Cappur, the Company's 
Remembrancer, petitions to be entertained and recommended to 
some of the factors at Bantam in order to be educated by them 
and so enabled to serve the Company better hereafter ; the Court, 
willing for his father's sake to employ him, orders that he be placed 
under Mr. Sambrooke in the countinghouse to gain experience, 
and next spring he shall be sent abroad ; he is allowed 10/. for diet 
meanwhile. {p-\pp') 

A General Court, March 24, 1641 {Cotirt Book, vol. xvii, 
P- 443)- 

Mr. Governor explains that this court is summoned at the request 
of Mr. Smithvvick ; but that before proceeding to this business he 
desires to inform the generality that the William left the Downs 
last Monday, and that the Mary, the London, and the Discovery 
are at Gravesend ready to proceed to their destined ports ; also 
that the negotiations with Mr. Courteene have failed. He further 
reports that the Committees have absolutely agreed to close this 
present Joint Stock, to which end an order of court has been made 
that no more shall be sent out upon it, and a section in the letter 
to Surat has been composed to the same effect. These are both 
read and the Governor desires the court to take them into con- 
sideration. Mr. Smithwick approves of sending the letter, but 
as to putting the close of this Stock to the question he declares 
that Lord Say desires to be heard on this business, and that when 
the Governor shall call a court to discuss this and other particulars 
Lord Say, the Earl of Bristol, and Lord Brooks will attend and 
deliver their opinions. Much dispute ensues ; and in the end 
it is decided to send the letter but to forbear the determination 
of the other question until the said Lords have been heard. 



156 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, March 24, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 475). 

Consideration had of the order received from the House of 
Commons under the hand of Sir Robert Harloe^ procured by- 
Mr. Smithwick upon his petition to Parliament against the Com- 
pany. By this order all books, letters, &c., concerning the manage- 
ment of the East India trade are to be brought into the ' Commons 
House of Parliament,' which will cause a great deal of trouble, 
especially now that the ships are about to be dispatched. It is 
thought fit, therefore, notwithstanding that the Court is ready 
and willing to show all obedience to the said order, to desire two 
or three of the Committees to wait upon Sir Robert Harloe and 
acquaint him with these inconveniencies and request that the House 
will make choice of any merchants upon the Exchange or Com- 
mittees of the House to examine all or so many of the Company's 
books as they shall think necessary for their information in the 
particulars complained of, without removing them from their 
respective offices ; and that Smithwick shall not be permitted 
to examine the said books at his pleasure, but that he be first 
enjoined to put in writing what he wishes to see, and then the 
Court will not object but ' in all dutifuU and respective manner' 
give due observance to the commands of the House, (i p.) 

A Court of Committees, March 26, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 476). 

The Court receiving information of the great amount of private 
trade put aboard the London by many, and particularly by the 
master's mate, John Stallon (Messrs. Robinson and Dighton, 
the King's searchers at Gravesend, having discovered and seized 
fifteen broadcloths belonging to him), Stallon is sent for. He 
confesses his fault and protests that the only reason why he so 
offended was that he had so little time to get things allowed by 
the Company, that unless he had bought the cloth he would have 
had nothing of advantage for himself. The Court blames him 
severely for trading to such an extent in a commodity peculiar 
to the Company, and thinks of dismissing him, but upon debate 

' Sir Robert Harley, grandfather of the statesman of the same name. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 157 

decides not to do so, on account of the value of his services ; more- 
over, Stallon freely offers the fifteen cloths, which he bought from 
Mr. GuUifer, to the Company at the price he paid for them, and 
promises to be careful in the future. His offence is therefore over- 
looked, and he is told that the Company will take the said cloths 
at the price he paid, which, as he pretends, is 190/. Nicholas 
Crispe, ironmonger, of Bread Street, is accepted as security for 
John Clutton, purser of the Mary. Daniel Andrews, James Fenn, 
Peter Richaut, and his eldest son are accepted as securities for 
pepper. Mr. Smithwick presses into the court in an uncivil and 
unmannerly fashion, and takes the seat of one of the Committees ; 
and being rebuked by the Governor and others and desired to 
withdraw, as business of great importance is being discussed, 
he replies that he will not stir (unless he is thrust out) until he has 
received an answer to the order brought from the House of Com- 
mons. Hereupon he is informed that on conclusion of the present 
business he shall be called in ; but not being satisfied he still keeps 
his seat. The Court being disturbed by his insolent and audacious 
behaviour (he having done the same many times before) and every- 
one being ready to depart, Alderman Gayre advises him ' in a faire 
language ' not to be thus refractory ; ' wherupon he returned these 
words: that hee would sitt in the Court of Committees when 
Mr, Alderman should not. And notwithstandinge all the intreaties 
and persuasions they could use, hee refused to leave his chayre or 
depart the court, untill by a generall consent their beadle was sent 
for and required to thrust him out ; which, in obedience to their 
commands, and by reason of the obstinacy of the said Smethwicke, 
hee performed accordingly. And for this cause the said Smeth- 
wicke hath entred two severall accions against him, the one of 100/. 
and the other of 20A' (i|//-) 

A Court of Committees, March 29, 1641 {Covert Minutes, 
vol. xvii, p. 477). 

Mr. Acton's bill of 6/. is. <Sc/. for law causes to be paid. John 
Younge to be directed to make an exact account of all the Com- 
pany's cables, anchors, boats, and other provisions remaining in the 
storehouses at Sandwich and Deal. Edward Rcynes, formerly 
apprentice to Mr. William Robinson, Senior, is admitted to the 



158 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

freedom of the Company by service, paying 20^. to the poor-box. 
Relation being made by Mr. Deputy, Messrs. Wilson and Kerridge 
of the direction given by Sir Robert Harloe concerning Mr. Smith- 
wick seeing the Company's ' bookes, acts of court, letters, consulta- 
tions &c.', according to an order from the House of Commons, and 
the Court not thinking it right that Smithwick should be allowed 
to see the said books in the presence of only one of the Company's 
officers, in case he should attempt to take away any papers, 
direction is given that when Smithwick comes to any office to 
search by virtue of the said order, John Spiller shall always be 
present with the other officers, not only to witness to any insolency 
but to hinder him from embezzling or violently taking away any 
records other than those required by Sir Robert Harloe's direction. 
James Gofife and Richard Cheverton accepted as securities for 
pepper. The Court disputes whether to suffer Mr. Smithwick, 
in accordance with a note written by him and delivered to Richard 
Swinglehurst, to see the treaties and other papers which have passed 
between the Company and the Dutch, and thinking it altogether 
unfit (these papers having no relation to Smithwick's complaints 
presented to Parliament, and the business with the Dutch having 
been taken up by the King and State, and being now so far 
advanced that there is great hope of an accommodation between 
both Companies), resolves that the Secretary shall attend Sir Robert 
Harloe and tell him of Smithwick's demand and entreat his advice 
whether to allow these papers to be shown or not. {}-\pP-) 

A Court of Committees, March 31, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 444). 

Upon information that John Stallon has left indebted to many, 
including his horsekeeper, and has carried away private trade 
belonging to other men to the value of 25/. or 30/., the Court 
at first resolves to send for and discharge him ; yet out of respect to 
Mr. Whittacres, on whose recommendation Stallon was entertained, 
it is decided to command him by letter to satisfy the horsekeeper 
and to send back the private trade he has ' coloured ', or order will 
be given for his dismissal. Being reminded of the good services 
rendered at sundry times by the Officers of the Navy in accommo- 
dating the Company with boats, cables, anchors, &c., at the 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 159 

departure and return of the ships, the Court in acknowledgement 
of these courtesies directs that twenty marks worth of spices be 
given to Sir Henry Palmer, Captain Batten, Surveyor of the Navy, 
and Captain Pett. Timber to be supplied for repair of the Mary's 
rudder, which has been broken by foul weather, and cordage from 
Sandwich for the Discovery and other ships wanting it. On reading 
an order from the Chancery, dated the 30th inst., between Constance 
Askwith, widow, plaintiff, and Abraham Chamberlaine and others, 
defendants, requiring the Company to pay 187/. loj-. in calicoes 
and 187/. IOJ-. in silks to Mrs. Sarah Edwards and 93/. 15^. in money 
to Mr. Cole, the same is ordered to be done, (i /.) 

Warrant from Charles I, March, 1641 {Public Record 
Office: Dom. Chas. /, vol. cccclxxviii, No. 83). 

Warrant of the King to the Clerk of the Signet attending. 
Francis Lord Cottington, about August last, by our special com- 
mand and for our service bought of the East India Company 2,310 
bags of pepper, which at %s. id. the lb. came to 63,283/. 11s. id., 
which was to be paid at four six months, viz. 29 March, 1641, 
14,000/.; 29 September, 1641, 14,000/.; 29 March, 1642, 14,000/.; 
29 September, 1642, 14,000/.; and 29 December,i64i, 7,283/. ijj-. 1^. ; 
and by our like directions Lord Cottington, for supply of our then 
pressing occasions for payment of our army in the North, sold the 
pepper at lod. per lb. for ready money, amounting to 50,626/. I'js. id., 
which was paid into our Exchequer in September and October last, 
by which sale for ready money about 12,656/. 14s. was lost. But 
by a calculation examined and subscribed by George Bingley, an 
auditor of our imprests, it appeared that the time of payment of the 
sum we received for the pepper being four six months before we 
were to pay for it, there was saved to us out of the loss of 
12,656/. I4J-. the sum of 6,075/. ^y- -^- ^^ ^^e rate of eight 
per cent, for interest, by the reason of the payment of that sum 
in ready money; so that the clear loss to us is but 6,581/. os. lod., 
which by our letters patent of January 15, 1641,^ for the reasons 
therein contained, we declared we were content to undergo by the 
sale of the pepper and to discharge Lord Cottington of the same. 

' These have not been traced. 



i6o COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Now as Lord Cottington desires to pass a formal account of the 
pepper before one of the auditors of the imprest for his more full 
discharge, and that 6,075/. ^3^- 2^- ^o saved to us will not be 
allowed upon the account for pepper without our warrant, our 
pleasure is that you forthwith prepare a bill for our signature 
containing a privy seal for the full discharging Lord Cottington 
as well for the sum so saved as the loss of 6,581/. o^. lod., and 
concerning his buying or sale of the said pepper. [Draff. 2 pp.) 

A Court of Committees, April 2, 1641 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 446). 

Boatswain Ingram is given 20/. in recognition of his services at 
the departure and return of the ships, but his request for increased 
wages is refused. Thomas Styles reports an offer made for the 
Company's defective ordnance at Deptford, and proposes that 
labourers shall be appointed to separate the serviceable from the 
rest ; whereupon Fotherby is directed to set men to this work, and 
to make a list of the nature and defects of the ordnance, that it may 
be proportioned for sale by the Governor and Committees, who 
intend shortly to go to Blackwall and survey all the stores there. 
Captain Matthew Wills's account of 122/. is ordered to be cleared ; 
but his request for the usual gratification for bringing his ship the 
London into the Downs as her first port is referred, there not being 
a full court. The accusation and complaint of John Barres, late 
master of the William., against the purser, Thomas Fenn, with the 
answer of the latter are read, and nothing being found to cause 
stay of Fenn's wages they are ordered to be paid and his account 
cleared. Edward, son of Alderman Prescott and apprentice to Mr. 
John Powell, is admitted to the freedom of the Company by service 
and pays 20j. to the poor-box. (li//-) 

A Court of Committees, April 7, 1641 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 447). 

Mr. Smithwick makes known that he is in want of money to fee 
his lawyers, and prays the Court to order payment of the sum he 
pretends is due to him for the brokes imposed on his adventure, or 
to allow him to offer for sale by the candle 200/. or 300/, of his said 
adventure. Accordingly a candle is set up and he offers 100/. at 



EAST INDIA COMPANY i6i 

35/., three-quarters being taken out; but although Smithwick 
brought Mr. Jacques Oyles with him, who it was supposed would 
buy the adventure, neither he nor any of the Committees bid for it. 
Whereupon he asks for another candle to be set up, and offers 200/. 
of his adventure, the principal being taken out, and values it at 15/. 
per cent. ; but this candle also goes out without a bid. However, 
Mr. Bludworth offers 30/. without the candle for the 200/., which 
Smithwick accepts, and the Court orders the same to be registered. 
It appearing from letters now read from Mr. Job Throgmorton that 
he has 7,000/. in rials of eight raised by the sale of the Company's 
pepper consigned to him, and wishes to know how to remit the same, 
Mr. Bowen is directed to write to Mr. Throgmorton and tell him to 
send the money, or the greater part of it, in the best ship or ships 
coming next from Leghorn to London, and to do his best to return 
it in ' rialls of Sivills [Seville] or other weighty rialls of eight ' ; and 
if he can procure able men to accept the remainder, to make it over 
by bills of exchange. The Court orders that 203/. ^s. 4^., due on 
account of the broadcloths transferred by John Stallon to their 
account, be paid to the latter's father, Timothy Hart, or his assigns. 
Examination had of the accusation brought against Robert Manly, 
lately one of the Company's factors in Persia ; but a decision is 
deferred. (i|//.) 

A Court of Committees, April 9, 1641 [Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 449). 

The examination of the complaints and accusations sent from 
Persia and India against Robert Manley is resumed. After long 
debate the Court agrees (notwithstanding that Manley by his own 
confession has been a very expensive and extravagant servant) to 
pay the 73/. 135-. 3^. due to him, on condition that before receiving 
it articles are drawn up by Mr. Acton, and signed and sealed 
between Manley and the Company, whereby in the event of it 
appearing on the arrival of the next ships that he is indebted to the 
Company that he shall pay the same, while if there is more owing 
to him than what he is now to receive it shall be made good ; to all 
which Manley agrees. Captain Wills is given 100 marks as a grati- 
fication for bringing the London into the Downs as her first port. 
Mrs. Muschampe, widow of the late President at Bantam, petitions 

S.C.M. II M 



i63 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

for what is due upon her husband's salary of 300/. per annum, for 
repayment of the 200/. taken from him for private trade, and for 
consideration for his sufferings by the Dutch. The Court is wilHng 
to express its love and affection for her in remembrance of her 
husband, but as by reason of his short life he had received almost 
all his due, and because the amount of private trade cannot be 
ascertained until the arrival of the ships from Bantam (which are 
expected within two months), she is desired to wait patiently till 
then ; meanwhile Mr. Methwold is entreated to assure her of the 
Company's respect and good affection. Upon the petition of 
E!dward Mathews, assignee of Mary, widow and executrix of the late 
William Hall, one of the Company's factors in Persia, whose account 
is now presented by Sambrooke, the Court resolves that as the 
accounts are expected by the next ships Mathews must wait until 
they arrive, when what is due shall be paid ; but if in the meantime 
the executrix has occasion for 100/., it shall be paid to her on security 
being given. Robert Gale and William Christmas accepted as 
securities for pepper. Mr. Acton's bill of 4/. 4^". ()d. for law causes 
to be paid by Mr. Rilston, The Court, wishing to settle the com- 
plaints and accusations brought against Messrs. Pinson, Olton, and 
Hudson, orders a copy of the several accusations to be given to them 
that they may prepare their answers by next Wednesday, {p.^pp ) 

A Court of Committees, April 16, 1641 (Cot^rt Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 451). 

Thomas Griffin is given 40^. from the poor-box and promised 
entertainment next year. Two cables to be sent to Sandwich to 
supply the expected ships. The Court, understanding that the 
Officers of the Navy cannot receive money for things lent to the 
Company, orders Mr. Stephens to make two boats and send them 
with all speed ; and because the like timber cannot be returned, the 
Secretary is desired to consult Captain Batten and entreat him to 
accept some other kind, which shall be delivered forthwith to the 
King's stores. Richard Davies, with whom an agreement was made 
that he should be paid 4/. for pilotage of any of the Company's ships 
from Blackwall to Erith or Gravesend, is now to be allowed an 
additional 4^. for any vessel that shall anchor at Erith and stay 
there a week or more. (| /.) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 163 

A Court of Committees, April 21, 1641 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 452). 

Consideration had of the complaints and accusations brought 
against Henry Oulton ; but, there not being time to go through all 
the papers, determination herein is deferred until Friday come sen- 
night. The account of Richard Swinglehurst for disbursements in 
the Exchange Cellar, amounting to 107/. ijj-. 9^, (100/. of which he 
has already received), is presented ; the balance is ordered to be paid 
to him and 50/. more, for which he is to account. (^ p.) 

A Court of Committees, May 5, 1641 (Court Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 452). 

Richard Walcott, Marmaduke Peckett, William Robinson, and 
William Williams are accepted as securities for pepper. Mr. Stone's 
request for extension of time for the dust of pepper he bought, on 
account of the fall in price, is refused, the Court fearing to create 
a bad precedent. Captain Jordane applies for payment for pro- 
visions he delivered to the Company's servants at Bantam, and to 
have the account of the tonnage of his ship made up by next Friday; 
whereupon Messrs. Francklyn and Ashwell are entreated to perfect 
the said account by Wednesday. Ordered that no goods henceforth 
be delivered until those who have been accepted as security have 
signed the book of contracts. Fifty bales of cotton yarn to be 
delivered to Mr. Methwold, behaving paid in 1,000/. upon discount. 

(I A) 
A Court of Committees, May 7, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 

P- 453)- 

Thirty bales of cotton yarn from Mr. Langham's parcel to be 
delivered to Mr. Methwold, who has promised to tender security for 
it. The widow of Richard Gilson, who came home master in the 
London, is granted remission of the freight her late husband was 
ordered to pay on 9 cwt. of drugs. (^ p.) 

A Court of Committees, May 14, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 

P- 453)- 

The request of Captain Jourden for remission of freight on goods 
brought home in the Caesar, and for payment for provisions left at 
Bantam, is referred to Messrs. Francklyn and Ashwell. Mr. 

M 2 



i64 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Margett's desire that all moneys due to him may be made over to 
his creditors is referred to next Wednesday, there not being a full 
court. Mr. Smithwick reports that he has come from ' divers 
Lords ' who intend to give a meeting at a court on Monday, Tues- 
day, or Wednesday next. He shows a paper ' without hands ', and is 
told that when the Court sees the Lords' signatures a day shall be 
fixed. John Milward transfers to John Langham, William 
Cockayne, Humphrey Browne, and his son, Thomas Milward, his 
adventure and profits in the Third Joint Stock, being 12,093/. i^s., 
from which he has taken out dividends amounting to 9,069/. 16s. gd., 
leaving 3,023/. 18s. $d. Mr. Chauncy's request is debated, but 
nothing resolved concerning it. (i/.) 

A Court of Committees, May 19, 1641 {Co?irt Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 455). 

A general court is appointed for Friday come sennight in the 
afternoon. The wife of Nicholas Gove to have her pearls, on giving 
a receipt and paying what is due. Mr. Deputy and certain Com- 
mittees are entreated to attend the Lords about the Portuguese 
propositions. Ordered that no goods be delivered nor warrant made 
for their delivery until the buyer and his sureties have signed the 
contract for them. The money now in the hands of Romulo 
Romuli Paulo del Sera in Venice is to be remitted to Messrs. Lionel 
Wake and John Corham in Antwerp, and Mr. Muns is desired to 
write accordingly. The Committees resolve to go to Blackwall 
next Thursday week to examine the yard and stores. (^ p) 

A Court of Committees, May 21, 1641 (Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 455). 

Mr. Harris desiring to buy seven or eight tons of the Company's 
saltpetre for about 500/., he is asked 4/. loj. per hundred at six 
months ; but, wishing first to examine the saltpetre, he decides to 
give his answer at the next court. The petition of Alice, widow 
of Robert Bell, for remission of 1,275/. underwritten by her late 
husband in the Third Joint Stock but not paid in, together with 
the brokes due upon it for non-payment, is referred to the general 
court, (^/.) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 165 

A Court of Committees, May 26, 1641 {Court Book, vol. 
xvii, p. 456)- 

Thomas Harris, late apprentice to Mr. James Fenn, is ' sworne 
a free brother ' by service. Mr. Governor intimates that a general 
court is to be held next Friday at which divers of the Lords will be 
present ; he therefore desires to know what to propound to the 
generality. The last general court and the order of the Court of 
Committees of the first of March last touching the close of this 
Joint Stock being read, it is resolved to keep to that resolution, and 
to acquaint the generality with the reasons for doing so, viz., the 
continual running at interest and the great danger this Stock is 
likely to suffer if it is carried on ; also that an estimate has been 
drawn up of the Company's estate by which it is shown that 
the Company is indebted 50,000/. or 60,000/. more than it has 
in the country to pay. Mr. Margetts desires the favour of the 
Court for payment of 1,577/. due to Mr. Fletcher and himself for 
cordage, but after consideration it is resolved to keep the said money 
until it shall be due. Ordered that the money belonging to the 
estate of Abel Druce be paid into the Exchequer for payment to 
John Spiller, notwithstanding the warrant formerly given ; also that 
the 40/. remaining in the Company's hands belonging to John Smith, 
a factor deceased in India, be paid to Mr. Hanwell, his executor. 

(I A) 

'A Meeting at Blackwall,' May 27, 1641 [Court Book, \o\. 
xvii, p. 457)- 

Mr. Hayman and other inhabitants of Blackwall move the 
Governor and Committees for repair of the sluice or trough in 
the East Marsh. The order made by the Commissioners of Sewers 
at Great Ilford, the 15th of April last, is read, and Mr. Governor 
and the others on examining the sluice see the necessity of this work 
being done, and that now is the best time to do it. After conference 
with Richard Hall, the Marsh bailiff, and other workmen, the charges 
for material and labour being estimated, the Governor and Com- 
mittees, understanding that they have only ten acres of the said 
Marsh, offer their proportion of payment to Mr. Hayman and Mr. 
Fuller, the ' sworne expcnditor ', holding it fitting that Sir William 



i65 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Portman, Messrs. Middleton, Hayman, and Raylton, and Mrs. 
Dethicke, the other owners of the forty-eight acres of the Marsh, 
should pay their share. Mr. Hayman desires to have all the 
necessary timber from the Company's yard on paying the due value. 
Mr. Governor promises to acquaint the Court of Committees to- 
morrow with this request, and Mr. Hayman likewise promises to 
inform Sir William Portman about the defective sluice and the par- 
ticulars agreed to. Mr. Governor and the Committees, on viewing 
the stores and provisions in the yard and storehouses, order Mr. 
Fotherby to draw up a more detailed list. It is resolved to inform 
the Court of the need of repairing the wharf at the west corner of 
the yard towards the water ; and also of Mr. Fotherby 's proposal 
to set the coopers at work to make the casks, the Company not 
paying for these until they are used. Mr. Steevens moves that the 
' broken wayes ' in the easternmost dock may be replaced by sub- 
stantial ones with planks under to keep them from breaking, and 
that two of the gates in want of repair may be seen to ; all this is 
left to the consideration of the Court of Committees, (i^//.) 

A Court of Committees, May 28, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 
p- 459). 

Mr. Hayman to be paid 300/. upon account for the Company's 
proportion of the ten acres for repair of the sluice or trough in the 
East Marsh at Blackwall. He promises to give an account of this 
sum and to be answerable for all timber, ironwork, and other materials 
belonging to the Company to be used in this work. Mr. Fotherby 
is directed to afford every accommodation, as well with the Com- 
pany's horses as otherwise. Mr. Newman presents his account for 
pipestaves, but is desired to wait until they have been received, 
when a more reasonable demand for his pains will be expected from 
him. (I/.) 

A Quarterly General Court,i May 28, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xvii, p. 459). 

One of the generality calls attention to the fact that about eight 
or nine years ago a committee of the principal adventurers was 

* Among those present were the Earl of Dover, the Earl of V^'arwick, Lord Brooke, 
and Lord Coventry. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 167 

appointed to consider the book of standing orders, and that in the 
alteration of those orders one was that no man should be Governor 
above one year, but that a new Governor should be chosen at the 
election, and the old one not even nominated ; this order he now 
desires confirmed. An honourable Lord present ^ asserts that he 
was one of the said committee, and that as it was thought fitting 
then, so it is his opinion now that the Governor should be changed 
each year so that no man should be a ' perpetuall dictator ' to the 
Company ; not only will this do away with all jealousies, but if there 
is honour or profit to be derived from the office, all should in turn 
participate ; but in saying this he intends nothing to the prejudice 
of the present Governor, having always heard very worthily of him. 
The Governor returns thanks for this good opinion and desires the 
Court not to favour him, there being men far worthier and abler than 
himself to take his place, yet he requests that if any can tax him 
with wrong done to the Company they shall not hesitate to do so. 
Much dispute ensues, one thinking this business could be better 
debated on the election day (about a month hence) while another 
avers that by a clause in the Company's charter (now read) they 
have liberty to choose whom they please, and he sees no reason 
why they should lose their liberty. On this an honourable Lord 
observes that even if this Court decrees that the present Governor 
shall not be nominated on the election day, yet the next General 
Court, if it sees fit, will be at liberty to alter this or any other order. 
Finally it is resolved to put two questions to the meeting. The 
first, viz. whether the Company by its charter can choose the same 
Governor again or another, is assented to by a general erection of 
hands. Sir Henry Garraway (the Governor having been desired to 
withdraw ' into the parlour ') frames the second question, viz., 
whether for the good of the Company at the next election 'you will 
binde upp your hands ' not to nominate the present Governor ; this 
is denied with only one exception. This discussion being concluded, 
the Governor takes his chair again and represents that as Their 
Lordships have consented to grace the Company with their presence, 
it is fit to consider what the grievances complained of are ; and for 
their better information he commands that the petition and remon- 

' Probably Lord Brooke. For the proceedings of the special committee of 1632 see the 
Calendar 0/ Stale Papers, East Indies, 1630-34, p. 264. 



i68 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

strance presented to the King on the 37th of October, 1639, be 
read. This having been done, the Governor implores Their Lord- 
ships' aid in getting redress from the King and from the Parliament ; 
upon which they declare their willingness and promise every assis- 
tance in their power, advising that the grievances be expressed in 
writing and exhibited either to His Majesty or to the Parliament. 
The Governor then relates that the Court of Committees has lately 
considered the shutting up of this Third Joint Stock and ordered 
that no more shipping or stock be sent out, and that the goods 
returned shall first pay the Company's debts, and what remains be 
divided between the true proprietors. In order that Their Lordships 
may better understand this, the order of the Court of Committees of 
the first of March last is read, and Mr. Governor intimates that it 
was presented to the last general court for confirmation, but on it 
being made known that ' some honourable Lords ' would be present 
at this general court, resolution was deferred until now ; he there- 
fore entreats that any wishing to argue this matter will do so at once. 
Silence ensues, and then the Governor by desire puts it to the 
question, and by a general erection of hands the said order of the 
Court of Committees for closing this Third Joint Stock is ratified 
and confirmed. Mr. Smithwick moves for a select committee of the 
generality to be appointed with power to meet as often as they please 
to ' ripen ' things for the general court. One of the generality 
remarks that they have heard the Company's grievances, which are 
many and great, and that he himself, because of his public appoint- 
ment abroad, could enlarge upon many particulars, having been 
formerly commanded by the King to negotiate the same; he thinks 
it very fitting that these grievances should be represented to the 
King and Parliament, for doubtless their redress is the only hope of 
raising a new Stock. After much dispute a select committee is 
appointed to join with the standing committee to consider all 
grievances fitting to be presented to the King and Parliament, and 
to consider some way of raising a new Stock to support the trade. 
Those appointed on the select committee are : Messrs. Jarvis Elwayes, 
John Elwayes, Jeremy Elwayes, Edward Misselden, Stephen Burton, 
Thomas Keightly, Daniel Harvey ,William Garra way, Junior, Thomas 
Burnell, John Beadle, Gilbert Morewood, James Fenn, Thomas 
Smithwicke, James Martin, Nathaniel Deards, Richard Wild, and 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 169 

any other adventurer in the Company, if he please, provided he is 
not a ' stranger '. (3^- //>.) 

Sir Thomas Roe, at Arnhem, to Secretary Vane, 
May 28, 1641 {Public Record Office: Dom. Chas. I, vol. cccclxxx, 
No. 74). 

I have had some conference here about the depending contro- 
versies between the East India Companies, and have been bold to 
write my opinion to His Majesty thereupon, which is, that in the 
first place it is necessary to compose them, to keep up the trade, 
and to encourage our merchants, lest it fall wholly into the Dutch 
hands ; secondly, that I am confident the States will go no higher, 
and that, Sir William Boswell being shut up by a late and strict 
commission, these here are glad it may lie asleep. Therefore 
it will be more advantage both to the King and State to abate 
a little present money, which will soon be repaid by the customs if 
the trade renew, than to hazard both the one and the other by 
delay.... {% p.) 

A Court of Committees, June 4, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 

P- 4^3)- 

On reading the last general court, it is decided that the newly 
appointed committee shall meet weekly on Wednesdays, and the 
' constant ' Court of Committees on Fridays only. The Court next 
considers how far to ' wade ' in the Company's grievances, especially 
concerning Cobb and Ayres, when the King takes that business 
upon himself; Sir John Wolstenholme advises that the opinions of 
the Earl of Bristol, the Earl of Warwick, and Lord Say be taken 
and their directions followed. Henry Oulton appears, and on 
referring himself entirely to the Committees is advised to come 
when there is a full court. Mr. Chiverton desiring the 500/. due to 
Messrs. Fletcher and Margetts, or interest on the same, is told that 
when it appears who is the true proprietor the Company will do 
what is fitting, but so few being now present nothing can be done. 

(I /•) 



I70 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

' A Meeting of the Court of Committees with the 
MiXT Committee,' June 9, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xvii, p. 464}. 

Mr. Governor represents that by reading the last general court 
all can see the reason of this meeting, which is grounded upon 
a resolution taken by the generality for the conclusion of this Third 
Joint Stock, and they have met to consider how to raise a new one. 
Since this meeting was appointed it has pleased God to send home 
the Crispian (for which they are all bound to give thanks) with 
a very fair ' caraghoone ' ^ ; and yesterday the letters brought by 
her were read, but they are too long to be read now. However, 
the principal heads are given by a Committee, and from these it 
plainly appears that the Company's trade stands upon very good 
terms, and that if there were means to pursue it, there was never 
a better time. As this meeting is appointed to consider how to 
perform this, the first work is to remove all obstacles, for all incon- 
veniencies proceed from the languishing condition of the present 
Stock. One of the generality thinks that a book of subscription 
should be opened, with a preamble setting forth the present 
encouragements, and that for this the principal inducement would 
be a reglement with the Dutch, ' for the contencion betweene them 
hath hindred this Company thousand pounds yearly.' Another 
replies that the Company is not ready for a preamble; it is not 
the arrival of this ship or of another that can ' doe the deed,' but 
the encouragement must come from the King and State, in which 
case there would be a new Stock. A Committee then propounds 
that the work to be done is to ground themselves upon some par- 
ticulars how to raise a new Stock. The principal motive is to have 
protection from the State and not to be injured by the Dutch; 
secondly, to have no competitors in the trade ; thirdly, to consider 
whether it will be best to go on a Joint Stock, or as the Turkey 
trade is carried on ; fourthly, whether this trade is beneficial to the 
kingdom or not ; and lastly, whether it will be good for the adven- 
turers. Mr. Governor being desired to put the three last proposi- 
tions to the question, he asks, whether all present think it best to 
carry on this trade by a Joint Stock ; this is unanimously agreed 
to. The second question, viz. whether the trade is good for the 

^ ' Cargazoon ' (cargo) is meant. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 171 

kingdom if the Company be supported by the King's favour, a new 
charter confirmed by Parliament, and a good reglement arrived at 
with the Dutch, is also agreed to by all present. Thereupon it is 
moved that a committee of five or six be appointed to consider the 
foregoing particulars privately, and to report their opinions at one 
of these mixed courts ; but the day being far spent the court 
breaks up. (i| //.) 

A Court of Committees, June ii, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 466). 

Understanding by letters received from Mr. Fremlyn, President 
at Surat, that he has sent home twenty ' suckles ' ^ of mace in the 
Crispian on his own account and consigned it to Mr. Methvvold, the 
Court orders the mace to be weighed and delivered, intending to 
consider the freight later. John Spiller is appointed land-purser 
aboard the Crispiaji, and the Husband is directed to provide him 
with an assistant. Forty-seven of the hundred bags of pepper 
bought by Mr. Gearing to be delivered to Alderman Soame. After 
serious debate the Court orders that Monsieur Regamount be 
released upon such discharge as Dr. Ducke and Mr. Budd, the 
Company's proctor, shall advise. Messrs. Ashwell, Kerridge, and 
Methvvold are desired to attend the treaty between the Portuguese 
Ambassador and the Company. John Younge to be paid 18/. i8j-. 
for disbursements at Blackwall the last three weeks. Morees sold 
to James Martin at 12J-. and 20^. per piece, at six and six months 
upon discount, and saltpetre to Mr. Methwold, to be sent to the 
Duke of Holsteyn, at 4/. per hundred at two six months' time. 
Mr. Francklyn having sent to France for canvas to make pepper 
bags, and requesting that some one may be appointed to examine 
the same, Mr. Wilson is desired to do so. Mr. Acton's bill of 
4/. ^s. 2d. for law charges to be paid ; also the bill of Mr. Budd, 
the Proctor, for 17/. \os. Mr. Newman demands payment for pipe- 
staves bought by him in Ireland for the Company, and is told that 
when the staves are received his demand shall be considered ; 
meanwhile he is to be given 25/. on account, and is asked what he 
will take for freight to bring over the staves. He replies 3/. per 

^ A Malay measure, by which mace was bought. It seems to have been equivalent to 
about 120 lbs. 



172 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

thousand for the pipestaves and 40^-. per thousand for hogshead 
staves, which being the same as was demanded by Mr. Monnox, 
Newman is desired to procure a freight as cheap as possible and 
bring them over with all convenient speed, and a warrant is ordered 
to be procured from the Lords Commissioners for this purpose,^ 
Captain Styles is entreated to survey the Company's defective 
ordnance. (i| //.) 

A Court of Committees, June 16, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 467). 

The Court orders 1,100/., due to the King for impost on cloves 
and indigo brought home in the Caesar, to be paid to Sir Henry 
Garraway. Messrs. Throgmorton and Collyer at Leghorn are to 
be commissioned to provide coral to the value of 2,000 rials of 
eight. The Crispian having arrived at Gravesend, her ordnance 
and lumber are to be taken out at Erith, and she brought to 
Woolwich if the master and pilot think fit. John Hawkins, who is 
making two boats for the Company, is given 10/. on account. A 
petition is ordered to be drawn up for presentation to the House of 
Commons in the name of the Company to entreat for liberty to 
enter the goods returned in the Crispian ' at sight,' to pay such 
custom for them as shall be declared by the next book of rates, and 
to be allowed six and six months' time for payment, as is granted 
by the Company's charter. (| /.) 

A Court of Committees, June 18, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 46H). 

William Garraway transfers to his son William 4,000/. adventure 
and profits in the Third Joint Stock, upon which is divided 75/. per 
hundred. Charles Denne, an almsman at Poplar, is given 20s. for 
reading prayers morning and evening. Certain Committees are 
entreated to hear and report their opinions on the dispute between 
Thomas Clarke and Richard Hudson. Mr. Methwold intimates 
that he has bought 100 bags of pepper and sent it to Leghorn on 
purpose to have the proceed returned in coral, but seeing that the 
Company has also advised for coral he offers his at cost price ; the 

^ The warrant was issued on August 3 ; see the Privy Council Registers of that date. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 173 

Court thanks him but thinks that two buyers in the market may 
be prejudicial and advance the price ; whereupon Methwold 
promises to w ithdraw his advice and commission * by this night's 
post '. Mr. Markham's motion that some one may be entertained 
to perfect the Husband's books, as Seager and Chapman did 
formerly, is agreed to, but resolution herein is deferred until the 
Husband has been consulted and inquiry made for a capable 
person. Henry Oulton desires that his differences with the 
Company may be ended ; it is resolved to settle his business at 
a full court, and meanwhile to give him 50/. on account of his 
wages. (li pp) 

Propositions to be made to the Portuguese Ambassa- 
dors FOR IMPROVEMENT OF THE EaST INDIA COMPANY'S TRADE 
[June, 1641] {Public Record Office : East Indies, vol. ivB, No. 80). 

For liberty of conscience and free exercise of religion, notwith- 
standing the jurisdiction of the Inquisition. Admission to a free 
trade in all ports and places where the Portuguese reside beyond 
the Cape Bone Esperanza. That no more customs or duties be 
demanded than are paid by the natives at the several ports, the 
said customs not to be raised beyond what they are now. For 
a habitable and defensible magazine in some port or place of the 
Portuguese dominions where ships can conveniently resort, which, 
in regard of the Malabars being the common enemies of both 
nations and of all commerce, should be fortified. {\ p.) 

A Court of Committees, June 25, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 47°)- 

The Governor reports that, accompanied by the Deputy and 
Messrs. Ashwell and Methwold, he attended the Council on Wed- 
nesday and yesterday about the treaty with the Portuguese 
Ambassador ; but, the latter not appearing, the hearing of the 
propositions on both sides was deferred until yesterday. When 
the Ambassador came, the articles concerning this nation in 
general were read and then the particular propositions made by 
the Company. The Ambassador would not agree to any settled 
peace, as he had no commission to do so, but only to the truce 
being continued twenty-four months, instead of six as formerly 



174 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

agreed ; that for this purpose commissioners should be appointed 
on both sides to conclude the same truce in the East Indies ; and 
that, when the articles are agreed upon, the Company shall hear 
further. Information is given of the proceedings in the Admiralty 
Court concerning Monsieur Regimount, the French captain, who, 
upon the advice of Dr. Ducke and Mr. Budd, the Company's 
proctor, was discharged in court last Monday by an act of that 
court, and set his hand to confirm the truth of his allegation. 
A copy of the latter is read, but the Committees decide that for 
their better satisfaction it shall be authentically exemplified under 
the seal of the Admiralty. The Governor states that a general 
court is to be held this afternoon, and desires to know what is to 
be submitted to it. After debate it is decided to acquaint the 
generality with the arrival of the Crispian and the encouragement 
brought by her for continuance of the trade ; to ask whether, as it 
has been resolved to send out no more upon this stock, it is the 
intention to proceed this year by a Particular Voyage or by a Joint 
Stock. This Court thinks the latter would be the better way and 
that 600,000/. should be underwritten for six years, as less than 
ioo,coo/. yearly will not suffice ; and that 200,000/. in quick stock 
and small shipping should be sent out the first year. A General 
Court of Election is appointed to be held on the 2nd of July in the 
afternoon. The mariners in the Crispian to be paid their wages if 
there is nothing against them. The Court again considers the 
affairs of Henry Oulton, and after some argument orders his wages 
to be paid from the time they were allotted to the time of his 
arrival in England, at the rate of 50/. per annum, provided that 
before receiving them he gives a general release to the Company. 
All the money due for cordage to Mr. Fletcher above 1,000/. to be 
paid to Mr. Margetts at sight of Fletcher's hand and seal for the 
same ; and for as long as the 1,000/. shall be detained, interest is to 
be allowed at the rate of seven per cent, from last Midsummer. 
Mr. Sherborne is given a gratification of 200 marks for his extra- 
ordinary care and pains. John Younge to be paid 18/. 8j. 8^. for 
payments due at Blackwall for three weeks ; and the Husband to 
pay Chambers, the Company's barge master, 3/. \os. for taking the 
Committees to Erith for discharge of the Crispian. (2 pp) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 175 

A General Court, June 25, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xvii, 
p. 472). 

Mr. Governor expresses sorrow at seeing so few of the adven- 
turers, and presumes that the reason is the Common Council held 
this afternoon at the Guild Hall. He relates that it has pleased 
God to send home the Crispian, for which thanks ought to be 
returned not only here but ' in God's owne house publikely ', 
according to the admonition lately given them by the worthy 
gentleman who performed that service last. Mr. Governor inti- 
mates that the Jotias and the Szvan are expected to arrive shortly, 
and that the Committees will do their best to sell the goods 
returned in them ; that all things go prosperously in the Indies, 
' indeed never better ' ; and that there is no doubt but that good 
encouragement will be received from the King to revive the 
languishing trade. He further declares that, as the year ' spends 
apace,' if some speedy course be not taken to send a ship to the 
Coromandel Coast, it will be a great loss to the Company; and if 
the trade there is not kept up this year it may be lost altogether. 
If it is resolved not to continue this Joint Stock, yet something 
will be done ; therefore the Governor desires the generality to take 
this into consideration by the next meeting. On the petition of 
Captain John Milward, and at the request of Thomas Smithwicke, 
it is resolved to reduce all brokes in the Third Persia Voyage from 
1 2/. to 8/. per cent, (i p.) 

A Court of Committees, June 30, 1641 {Court Book, vol xvii, 

P- 473)- 

Mr. Rawsterne, Mr. William Middleton, and Mr, Russell granted 
allowance on silk bought of the Company. John Edwards and 
Richard Glover, administrators of the late Richard Edwards, 
draper, transfer to John Massingbird 1,000/. adventure and profits 
in the Third Joint Stock, upon which is divided 751/. i6s. ^d. 
Mr. Elwood of Sandwich to be desired to send a particular account 
of all the Company's stores and provisions at Deal or Sandwich. 
Mr. Langham to have 33/. tare on every bale of the cotton yarn 
lately bought by Alderman Abdy. The estate of William Osman, 



176 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

who died in the Crispian, to be paid to his executor, notwith- 
standing the will was proved in the Bishop of London's court. 

A Court of Committees, July 2, 1641 {Cow- 1 Book, vol. xvii, 

P- 474). 

The Court orders the Crispian to be put into one of the 
docks at Blackwall, to save the charge of her lying afloat. The 
packs of canvas from France sent for by Mr. Francklyn are to be 
received into the Exchange Cellar to make pepper bags, and 10^ 
\sic\ per ell to be paid for the canvas at Christmas. After much 
dispute Mr. Langham is allowed 33/. for tare on each bale of cotton 
3'arn he bought and consigned to Mr. Methwold. Mr. Acton's bill 
of 10/. \s, for law charges to be paid, and 13/. 7^-. to be given to 
John Younge for wages at Blackwall. {\p-) 

A General Court of Election, July 2, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 1). 

Sir Christopher Clitherow, the Governor, reminds the court of 
a former order made, viz. that the book-keeper should about this 
time present a balance of the Company's estate ; this balance has 
been drawn up, and shows that when all debts are paid (20,000/. 
being allowed for twelve months' interest until these are settled) 
there is 80,000/, or 90,000/. remaining towards a division of twenty- 
five per cent., and when it shall please God to send home the Jonas 
(which is shortly expected), such a division may be given to each 
adventurer. The Governor then thanks all for their love and good 
opinion in choosing him for his present post ; and declares that, 
though he may have performed their business weakly, yet he has 
striven to do it honestly and faithfully, and now willingly resigns, 
with best wishes for the Company's welfare, but no desire to be 
nominated for re-election. He is requested to withdraw to the 
parlour; when he is nominated with Sir Henry Garraway, Sir John 
Wolstenholme, and Alderman Gayre, and by a general erection of 
hands re-elected Governor. On being told, he returns thanks to 
the court and takes the accustomed oath. Mr. William Cockayne 
desires that the court will choose some abler man to fill his post 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 177 

of Deputy, at the same time observing that there is so much dis- 
turbance in the Company's business, caused mainly by one adven- 
turer, ' that a man will not bee hired thereunto.' Nevertheless he 
is nominated, with John Langham, Rowland Wilson, and William 
Methwold, and by general consent again elected Deputy. Robert 
Bateman, notwithstanding his protest on account of advanced years, 
is re-elected Treasurer, and the following six Committees are chosen 
in place of those resigning according to custom : Alderman Garrett, 
Sheriff Reynardson, Thomas Hodges, William Garraway, Junior, 
Richard Bateman, and Gilbert Moorewood. The vacancy caused 
by the death of Alderman Abdy was filled by the election of Sir 
John Wolstenholme last December, and Matthew Cradockc having 
died and his place not being supplied, the following five Com- 
mittees resign : Sir Morris Abbott and Messrs. Spurstow, Trott, 
Francklyn, and Bludworth. So the Committees for the ensuing 
year are : Sir John Wolstenholme, Sir Henry Garraway, Aldermen 
Highlord, Cordwell, Soame, Gayre, and Garret, Sheriff Reynardson, 
and Messrs. HoUoway, Stiles, Langham, Wilson, Clarke, Mun, 
Ashwell, Middleton, Davies, Kerridge, Massingbird, Methwold, 
Hodges, Garraway, Bateman, and Moorewood. (2^ />/>.) 

A Court of Committees, July 7, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, 
P-3)- 

The Court being doubtful of the safety of the Jewel, as nothing 
is heard of her from the Dutch or the Company's ships just re- 
turned, orders Mr. Hurt to notify that no more month's pay is to 
be distributed to the wives of mariners or others employed in her. 
Certain Committees are desired to hear and report on the dispute 
between Richard Hudson and Thomas Clarke ; others to settle the 
difference depending between the Company and Captain Jourden ; 
and others to examine the private trade brought home in the Cris- 
pian. The Governor having related what passed between himself. 
Sir Henry Vane, and some of the Committees concerning the offer 
made by the Dutch of 500,000 guilders in settlement of all differ- 
ences between the two companies, and the money not being yet 
paid, he desires the court to consider and resolve on what shall be 
done in this matter, as a report is abroad that if the Company 
obtains no restitution from the Dutch there can be no expectation 

S.C.M. II N 



178 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

of a subscription either for a Joint Stock or for a Particular Voyage. 
Much dispute ensues. Some advise that a book for subscription 
to a Joint Stock should remain open for three weeks, and if this is 
not successful then a book for a Particular Voyage ; if neither take 
effect then the State must be acquainted. Others think that the 
King should be told of the discouragements of the Company, that 
it is not permitted to take ' the benefitt of this Parliament ' against 
the employers of Cobb and Ayres, and has had no satisfaction 
from the Dutch ; for, if the book for subscriptions is tried first, the 
year will be too far advanced for a ship to be dispatched to Masuli- 
patam this season, which will so distract the Company's business 
that the trade will in all probability fall into the hands of the Dutch 
and never be recovered again. Another proposes that a division 
of twenty- five per cent, be made to the adventurers ; and this being 
discussed, it is decided that the goods fittest to be so divided are 
silk, calicoes, and cloves, and should this division bring the Com- 
pany into a debt of 10,000/. or 20,000/., then a policy of assurance 
may be made for the amount, there being seven or eight ships 
abroad and the return of one would redeem the said debt. On this 
motion, the order made the ist of March last, wherein it was re- 
solved to pay all debts first and then divide the remainder, is read, 
with the balance of the Company's estate as it now stands, drawn 
up by Sambrooke. These are considered, and as it is seen that 
there is sufficient ' in the land ' to pay all debts by selling the 
pepper and indigo, and that 20,000/. is allowed in the said balance 
for payment of interest, it is generally agreed that a division of 
twenty-five per cent, shall be made, notwithstanding the former 
order. The Court next resolves on the prices of the goods to be 
thus divided, and orders that every man shall take out this division 
in the goods proposed, and none be permitted to have a warrant 
for this until he has cleared the two former divisions of silk and 
calicoes. A court of sales is appointed to be held this day week 
for disposal of the other goods. Resuming consideration of the 
restitution to be made by the Dutch, and the withdrawal from Par- 
liament of the petition about Cobb and Ayres, the Court resolves 
that a petition shall be drawn up by next Friday declaring the 
discontent of the adventurers and the causes of their disheartening, 
which when agreed upon shall be forthwith presented to the King. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 179 

Elizabeth Porter, widow and executrix of the late James Porter, 
transfers to John Massingbird 75/. adventure and profits in the 
Third Joint Stock, upon which is divided "[fil. \s. 4d. Martyn 
Peterson, a Dutchman, who came home in the Crispian^ is given 
50^. for services performed in the said ship. Mr. Acton's bill of 
8/. 7 J. 6d. for law causes to be paid. {'^\pp-) 

A Court of Committees, July 9, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 6). 

The last court concerning the opinion of the Governor and Com- 
mittees then present on the intended division of twenty-five per 
cent, is read and discussed at large, and a general court is ordered 
to be summoned for next Wednesday for confirmation or alteration 
of the said opinion. Captain Jourden to be given 400/. for pro- 
vision and stores left by him at Bantam. Mr. Margetts desires to 
be paid 1,000/. due to him for cordage supplied to the Company, 
and promises to give good security in case any statute of bank- 
ruptcy should be put forth against Mr. Fletcher ; he is desired 
first to consult Mr. Acton, Serjeant Pheasant, and Mr. Recorder. 

(!/•) 

A General Court of Sales and a General Court, 
July 14, 1641 {Court Book^ vol. xviii, p. 7). 

Sale of pintado quilts, rice, wet and dry pepper and dust of 
pepper, olibanum, myrrh, gum-lac, indigo and dust of indigo, 
nutmegs, dust of cloves, and cotton yarn, with prices and names 
of purchasers. At the conclusion of the sale the Governor asks all 
who are not free of the Company to withdraw, as he has something 
to impart about the Company's general affairs. This being done, 
he remarks that, as they have just seen, the Committees have taken 
care to sell the goods to enable the debts at interest to be cleared, 
these lying heavy upon the Company ; they have also considered 
the making of a division of twenty-five per cent, to the adventurers 
in silk, calicoes, and cloves, in which he thinks something might 
fall short of what is ' in the land ', but it will be no considerable 
matter, the debts and interest being paid. It is thought fit that 
as the Stock is ncaring an end each adventurer shall take out his 
division in the goods proposed, and none be permitted to have his 

N 2 



i8o COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

warrant until he shall have cleared the two former divisions of silk 
and calicoes. These particulars being made known to the gene- 
rality, after some silence Mr. Governor is desired to put the making 
of this division to the question, which he does, and by a general 
erection of hands it is consented to. The Governor further acquaints 
the generality that the Committees have framed a petition to the 
King concerning the present state of the Company, which he desires 
them to hear and alter as they please, or to order its delivery to 
the King ; the petition is read and the Court agrees to the latter 
course being pursued. John Cooke desires to be excused for non- 
payment of 200/., which he subscribed by way of addition to his 
remains of 1,100/, in the Second Joint Stock ; and also requests the 
remission of 61/. i6s. charged upon his said adventure for non- 
shipment of calicoes. The Court agrees to help him as regards the 
first part of his request, but refers him to the Court of Committees 
concerning his brokes. ( 2^ pp) 

A Court of Committees, July 23, 1641 {Court Book, vol xviii, 
p. 10). 

Nicholas Heme transfers to William Geere 625/. adventure and 
all profits in the Third Joint Stock, upon which is divided 
455/- 17^. 7^. John Mucknell, Richard Cogan, Henry Tyrell, 
John Gayton, and Felix Wombwell, master's mates in the Crispmu, 
to be paid their wages, if there is nothing against them. The 
Governor relates that he, with Mr. Deputy, and Messrs. Holloway, 
Ashwell, Middleton, and Garraway, waited last Wednesday on the 
King and delivered the Company's petition. His Majesty asking 
the gist thereof, Mr. Governor explained that it concerned the 
40,000 guilders^ offered by the Dutch in satisfaction of former 
wrongs and injuries done to the Company. The King replied that 
he had commanded Sir Henry Vane to write to Sir William Boswell, 
and he now promised to second this command. The Governor 
then moved that the King would by his grace and favour have the 
Company's charter confirmed by Act of Parliament, to which His 
Majesty replied that, if a petition to this effect were drawn up, he 
would recommend it to both Houses. On hearing this, the Court 
orders such a petition to be forthwith drawn up for His Majesty's 

^ Probably ' pounds' is intended. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY i8i 

recommendation. Francis Day, a factor lately returned in the 
Crispian, desires to be paid some part of his salary for maintenance ; 
there being above 500/. due to him, he is to be given 200/. Sabian 
Stayresmore and Robert Stone accepted as securities for cloves ; and 
Thomas Hanson and Thomas Thatcher for myrrh and oHbanum. 
Upon the petition of John Carter, who was sent home a prisoner in 
the Crispiati, certain Committees are entreated to hear and report 
on the accusations brought against him, William Garraway reports 
that Sir Henry Garway is indebted to the King 7,073/. is. 2d. for 
impost on the Caesar s goods, only 5,000/. being deducted from 
that account by the goods shipped, so that Sir Henry is still 
indebted 2,073/. is. 2d. besides 4,095/. for impost on the Crispians 
goods ; William Garraway moves, on behalf of Sir Henry, whose 
account with His Majesty is to be perfected, that the Court will 
take some course for clearing these two debts ; whereupon Messrs. 
Holloway and Garway are directed to confer with the Farmers and 
settle some suitable arrangement. Edwin Browne and William 
Williams accepted by the balloting-box as securities for pepper. 

A Court of Committees, July 28, 1641 {Court Book, vol. -xxmi 
p. 11). 

An estimate of 550/. for repairing the Crispian is presented by 
Steevens, whereupon it is agreed that she shall be repaired ' by the 
day ' and that a separate account shall be kept of her voyage. All 
goods and money due to the late George Sephton, who died in 
India, to be paid to his brother and executor, except 87/. ' lett out' 
in the Jewel. Thomas Tutchin and William Crosse accepted as 
securities for cotton yarn. Messrs. Margetts and Fletcher to be 
paid 1,000/. for cordage, on Acton's report that the Recorder and 
Sergeant Phesant are of opinion that this payment may be made 
with safety, even though there should be a statute of bankruptcy 
issued against Fletcher. Mr. Acton's bill of 5/. o^. dd. for law 
causes to be paid. Motion is made on behalf of Kcnclm Wil- 
loughby's employment to perfect the Husband's books ; Willoughby 
desires a yearly salary, but the Court refuses to entertain any new 
officer, and only consents to consider his appointment if he will 
take a certain sum on completion of the work, for which purpose he 



i8a COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

is directed to ascertain what there is to be done before making any 
demand. The casks required for the ships this year to be prepared, 
and the necessary amount of billets to be provided. Mr. Rilston is 
directed to pay Boatswain Ingram's bill of 7/. ijs. 6d., and Steevens 
to provide timber and plank, {i^ pp.) 

The King to the Commissioners of the Treasury, 
[July?] 1641 {Pjihlic Record Office: Dotn. Chas. /, vol. cccclxxxii, 
No. 121). 

Amongst the many great straits I am in for want of money, none 
so much afflicteth me as the consideration of my late Farmers [of 
the Customs], who, for my service, lie under the pressure of so great 
a debt. I desire that you make use of the first opportunity, either 
by money or any other means, by which you may shorten their 
great debt. In respect of the great consequence of the East India 
trade to this kingdom, there being so great a debt owing to them 
by us, it is our pleasure that the first [money] you can procure, 
either out of the Forest of Dean, concerning which we understand 
you are in treaty with Sir Bainham Throgmorton and others, or 
any other way, may be paid in for the satisfaction of the East India 
Company's debt. {Draft, i p.) 

The King to the late Farmers of the Customs, [July ?] 
1 641 {Public Record Office : Dom. Chas. I, vol. cccclxxxii. No. 121). 

We take notice by your letters of the great danger of ruin you 
are in by the debt of the East India Company, of which we are 
very sensible, resolving to make use of the first opportunity, either 
by the customs being settled, or any other way, for your discharge. 
{Draft. \p) 

Balance Sheet of the Third Joint Stock ^ [?July, 1641] 
{Home Miscellaneous^ vol. xxxix, p. i6a). 

On the credit side are : sums due by bills, bonds, &c., 260,624/. ; 
stock in cash and goods, 70,570/. ; cargo of the Crispiaii, 
127,507/. \'3^s. \d.\ total, 458,701/. I3J-. 4^. The debits include: 
money owing at interest on April 30, 267,152/. ; six months' interest 

* 'Taken to the fine of Aprill, 1641 ; cor.tinewed and encluding the Crispiana^ 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 183 

thereon at 7 per cent., 9,345/. ; amount required to complete the 
division of 75 per cent., 56,^6^1. ; subsidy, impost, freight, and pro- 
visions, 20,998/. ; due to the adventurers in the Second Joint Stock 
and Voyages, 4,606/. ; subsidy and impost on the Crispian, 10,000/. ; 
sundry other expenses, 5,650/. ; fourteen months' discount of 120,000/. 
at 8 per cent., 12,300/.; total, 386,516/,; leaving towards a fourth 
division, 72,185/. 13^". A,d. In addition to this there is 9,000/. at 
Venice, &c. {2 pp.) 

A Court of Committees, August 4, 1641 {Co7irt Booh, 
vol. xviii, p. 12). 

Nathaniel Havves transfers to Robert Freeman 942/. lOj-. adven- 
ture and profits in the Third Joint Stock, 'the principall being 
divided '. The Court, understanding that 438 bales of Legee silk, 
50 bales of Ardas, and 39 of Mazadran were returned in the 
Crispian, directs that each adventurer shall receive for his division 
five-sixths in Legee and one-sixth in Ardas or Mazandran, and 
desires three Committees to oversee the delivery of the said 
divisions. Captain Stiles is desired to go aboard the Hopewell and 
give directions for all her lumber, guns, and ordnance to be put 
ashore, all private trade to be sent up to the Custom-house, and 
nothing more to be unladen until further order. The Governor 
opines that, as the year is passing, the generality should be called 
together about a new subscription for a Particular Voyage for this 
year ; after some debate it is resolved to await the King's recom- 
mendation upon the Company's petition to Parliament for renewal 
of its charter. The Court decides to present Sir Henry Vane, who 
is and always has been ready to assist the Company on all occa- 
sions, with ' fifty peeces '. Mr. Ash well to be paid for the looking- 
glass he sent to Bantam. Mr. Stiles reports that he has been 
offered 4/. \os. per ton for the defective ordnance, loj-. per ton 
more than the last was sold for; and is told to use his own judge- 
ment in this matter. John Gearing, his son John, and Richard 
Crawly are accepted as securities for cloves. The estate of the 
late William Fall, a factor in Persia, to be paid to his executrix. 
Certain Committees are desired to hear the difference between 
Mrs. Powell and Thomas Clarke, who lately returned from India. 



i84 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, August 6, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 14). 

The Court consents to Mr. Diggs's motion that his father's 
business may be referred to two merchants, independent of the 
Company. John Brett, Stephen Bolton, Richard Piggott, and 
Samuel Crispe accepted as securities for indigo. Motion is made 
for a petition to be drawn up and presented to Parliament ' that 
the impost which should bee returned might not bee limited as 
formerly unto 13 monthes tyme, but that it might at all times bee 
free to export their goods and receive their impost '. Mr. Williams 
is called in about certain pepper bought by him, but the matter 
is referred until Richard Swinglehurst is present. Mr. Garway 
reports that ' the Romulo Romuly ' in Venice have sold all the 
pepper but twenty-three bags, and intend to keep the 25,000 or 
30,000 'duckats' to supply 'Livoarne' [Leghorn]. It is sug- 
gested that the 400 bags of pepper now in the warehouse should be 
sent to ' Livorne ' ; but resolution herein is deferred until the 
general court to be held next Thursday, on which day there is to 
be a court of sales also. Mr. Chauncy's letter is read, wherein he 
desires that his account may be settled and his adventures passed 
over for his maintenance; but nothing is decided. Mr. Hamwell, 
executor to Thomas Smith, demands certain money remaining in 
the Company's hands and his own legacy of about 7/. ; the Court 
offers to pay all the account if he will give a general discharge for 
it. (I/.) 

A Court of Committees, August 12, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 15). 

The Court orders the Hopeivell to be entered and unladen and 
her mariners to be paid their wages. Mr. Sambrooke having 
refused to give Mrs. Roberts, widow of Lewis Roberts, a warrant 
for the dividends due upon her late husband's adventure, as he 
was bound with Sir Morris and Mr. Edward Abbott to the Com- 
pany for payment of 623/. u. \d., the matter is considered, and 
it is resolved that on payment of half the debt she shall be given 
a warrant to receive the dividend of calicoes. William Vaughan, 
Robert Dycer, John Langely, and Richard Middleton accepted as 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 185 

securities for dust of indigo. The Court, on hearing what passed 
before the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury concerning the 
money due for the pepper sold to Lord Cottington, thinks that 
some of the securities should be prosecuted upon the first bond ; 
but no resolution is come to. Consideration is had of the private 
trade brought home in the Crispian by her master, Thomas 
Steevens; the Court notes the value of the Company's goods 
returned in the said ship, that Steevens has been careful and 
diligent, that he came home in good season and made the Downs 
his first port, and sent up a list of all private trade on arriving ; 
therefore he is granted remission of freight on his goods and given 
a gratification of 50/. Mr. Deputy ^ proposes that, as it has been 
resolved that nothing more shall be sent out upon this Joint Stock, 
it is high time to provide for a Particular Voyage, for until it is 
seen what the Parliament will do upon the Company's petition 
there is no likelihood of a Joint Stock being underwritten for ; he 
therefore suggests that a book for subscriptions for a Particular 
Voyage for this year shall remain open, by which if 120,000/. can 
be raised it will sufifice. This is generally approved and the 
Deputy is desired to propound it to the general court this 
afternoon. {}hpp-) 

A General Court of Sales and a General Court, 
August 12, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 17). 

Richard Middleton buys thirty barrels of rich indigo at 7.^. 6^. 
per lb. at three six months from ' Bartholmew day next '. Some 
more indigo and fifty bags of pepper are offered at the same price 
and time, also ten tons of saltpetre at 4/. per hundred ; but many 
candles go out without a bid. Mr. Deputy next entreats all who 
are not free of the Company to leave, as he has some business to 
communicate. He then repeats his former proposition for a 
Particular Voyage, as it has been resolved to send out no more 
upon the Third Joint Stock ; and again expresses his opinion 
that there will be no subscription for a Fourth Joint Stock until 
something be done by Parliament for the Company's encourage- 

1 Cokayne was in the chair. Clitherow was either ill or away from London at this time, 
for he did not reappear until October 6. 



i86 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

ment upon its petition, which had been presented to the King and 
by him recommended to both Houses, as is shown by the said 
petition and reference, which are now read. He further intimates 
that if they are not willing to accede to this, there are others so 
well affected to the trade that 120,000/. will doubtless be under- 
written to set forth two or three ships on a Particular Voyage. 
Some dispute ensues concerning the charge of factors and the 
management of the Voyage, to which reply is made that when 
the subscribers' names are known these and other particulars 
will be considered. One of the generality moves that a week 
be given for consideration ; whereupon a general court is 
appointed to be held next Wednesday ; in the meantime a 
preamble is to be drawn up and a book to remain open for any 
who please to underwrite. Mr. Deputy acquaints the Court that, 
as the pepper will not sell, the Committees think it best for the 
Company to send it into Italy on its own account. This is 
objected to by some, who think it is not good for the Company 
to have a double adventure, but they are told that a small matter 
will insure the loss, should there be any : that former parcels sent 
have been profitable : also that private men send it, and so there 
is no reason why the Company should not do the same. Mr. 
Deputy puts it to the question, and it is generally consented to. 
The sale of the indigo, aloes, and saltpetre is referred to the Court 
of Committees, (a //>.) 

A Court of Committees, August 18, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 19). 

Upon petition the wives of the sailors in the Jewel are ordered 
to be paid any money due to them up to November i, 1639. Messrs. 
Vaughan and Dicer offer ']s. 6d. per lb. for thirty barrels of indigo 
at four six months, or 6s. Sd. per lb. for the whole parcel ; Messrs. 
Brett and Boulton also make offers ; but, the price being thought 
too low, no agreement is reached. Twenty-three barrels of the 
said indigo are sold to Mr. Pooly at ys. 6d. per lb. at three six 
months. The Court resolves to forbear deciding what to do about 
recovering the money due from Lord Cottington for pepper until 
the second bond shall become due, which will be about Michaelmas. 
Francis, son of Thomas Smithwicke, is made free of the Company 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 187 

by patrimony and takes the accustomed oath. Thomas Smith- 
wicke transfers to his said son 300/. in the Third Joint Stock ; 
the principal being divided, the profits only are transferred, but 
Francis is to receive the proceeds when the divisions are declared, 
but is not to sell without his father's consent. Pepper to be sold 
to Thomas Bowyer at iSd. per lb. at three six months, he to pay 
for the same upon discount, as he intends to ship it for Barbary. 
Matthew, son of the late Richard Archdeale, to be paid all such 
divisions as are due upon his father's adventure. Richard Moorer 
desiring to be paid all divisions due upon his adventure, he is told 
that this cannot be done now, but Mr. Massingbird is directed to 
lend him 100/. upon his Stock. Richard Middleton, William Bate- 
man, Thomas Jennings, Robert Sainthill, William Cockayne, and 
William Corderay accepted as securities for indigo. Steevens' bill 
of 72/. to be settled. Messrs. Middleton and Massingbird are 
entreated to hear and report on the difference between William 
Cary and the Company. Richard Swinglehurst to be given 
50/. on account of disbursements at the Exchange Cellar, and 
28/. i6s. lid. which he has paid over and above what he 
received. (2^.) 

A General Court, August 18, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 21). 

Mr. Deputy declares that since the last court only some indigo 
has been sold ; that the business for which they have met is to 
make known their intentions with regard to the Particular Voyage 
proposed for this year. He hopes that before Christmas some- 
thing will be done in Parliament for the encouragement of the 
Company, but the present resolution will not admit of delay. The 
preamble to the intended subscription is then read twice and con- 
firmed by a general erection of hands ; and in like manner a Par- 
ticular Voyage for this year is agreed upon, for which any man 
free of the Company may underwrite. When the subscribers are 
known a mixed committee shall be appointed of ten or more of the 
old Stock and ten or more of the new who are not connected with 
the old ; and these shall arrange that this Particular Voyage shall 
not wrong the old Stock nor the old Stock wrong this Particular 
Voyage. Some dispute arises concerning the resolution passed at 



i88 COURT MINUTES, ETC, OF THE 

the last court to send the unsold pepper to Italy, it being thought 
that this will prove disadvantageous to the Company, and an offer 
is made to buy the said pepper by the candle next Wednesday 
before the Holland post arrives ; but on being put to the question, 
it is generally agreed to adhere to the former resolution to send 
the pepper to Leghorn, {^hpp-) 

A Court of Committees, August 25, 1641 (Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 22). 

Old ordnance and other unserviceable stores at Blackwall 
ordered to be sold. Mr. Methwold desires permission to under- 
write for 2,000/. in this Particular Voyage on behalf of Mr. 
Fremlyn, President at Surat, to be paid in India at 5^, the rial of 
eight, and engages his own adventure to make good the subscrip- 
tion ; he also wishes to underwrite for a like sum for himself. The 
Court approves and directs him to do so. Messrs. Ashwell and 
Methwold are desired to confer with Sir Morris Abbott about the 
debt for which the late Captain Lewis Roberts stands bound with 
Sir Morris for Edward Abbott, for, if Sir Morris will be security 
for the same, then the Captain's widow can be paid the divisions 
due upon her late husband's adventure. Roger Calcott, adminis- 
trator of the late Robert Coulson, who died at Bantam, petitions 
for 30/. from Coulson's estate; the Court, understanding that John 
Coulson desires stay to be made of payment of the said estate, 
orders that, unless he appears at next Friday's court to show cause 
for this, the 30/. is to be paid, (i p.) 

A Court of Committees, August 27, 1641 (Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 23). 

A remonstrance is presented on behalf of Sir Morris Abbott, 
concerning some ballast rubies and emeralds he sent to India about 
twenty years ago for which he received no satisfaction ; but the 
Governor being absent and only a few Committees present, no 
resolution is come to. Messrs. Ashwell and Methwold report 
that they have conferred with Sir Morris Abbott about his son 
Edward's debt to the Company, for which the late Captain Lewis 
Roberts stood bound with Sir Morris, and the latter is willing to 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 189 

clear the Captain ; whereupon the Court orders that Mrs. Roberts 
be paid all divisions due unto her upon her late husband's adven- 
ture. Giles Pooly, Mathias Datsell, Thomas Canham, and John 
Dingly accepted as securities for indigo, Pooly to pay 500/. before 
it is delivered. All wages and estate due unto the late Robert 
Coulson to be paid to his administrator, Roger Calcott. Sir John 
Wolstenholme, Alderman Gayre, and Mr. Deputy are entreated to 
confer with the Earl of Cleveland's steward about making the 
fine certain on the houses and grounds at Blackwall. Andrew 
Trumball, late master of the Hopewell, is directed to present an 
account of the cost of his private trade and what he took out with 
him. (i p.) 

A Court of Committees, September 3, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 24). 

Andrew Trumball requests remission of freight on goods he 
brought home as private trade ; many of the said goods having 
been damaged by water, the Court orders the longcloth, green 
ginger, and sugar to be delivered to him, his wages to be paid, and 
an account of the quantity and quality of all his goods to be given 
in at the next court. James Coxe desires that 500/. of his adven- 
ture may be passed over to Isaac Van Payne, but is told that as he 
has not paid his subscription of 1,600/. this cannot be done. The 
estate of the late Nicholas Gove (who died in Persia), amount- 
ing to 114/. I J-., to be paid to his wife and administratrix, she 
giving a general release. Resolved that no more coral be bought 
at Leghorn. Mr. Whittaker at Amsterdam to be given 50/. as a 
gratification for corresponding with and writing weekly letters to 
the Company ; this sum to be paid to Samuel Crispe according to 
Mr. Whittaker's order, and to be received in full of all services up 
to Christmas. The dispute between Thomas Clarke and Richard 
Hudson is heard. Clarke declares that Hudson seized him and 
his estate, containing 1,800 rials of eight belonging to the Company ; 
and he being ill and deprived of his senses and memory, the said 
rials were put upon his estate and he made liable for them. Hudson 
denies all this, pleads for an examination, and offers to refer himself 
to Clarke's books of accounts. The dispute having lasted so long 
the Court will hear no more, and refers the two men to the Com- 



I90 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

mittees formerly appointed to examine the matter ; but on request 
Clarke is ordered to be advanced 5/. (i^//-) 

A Court of Committees/ September 10, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 26). 

Mr. Deputy reports that last Wednesday, with the consent of 
two or three Committees, he sold on the Exchange fifty bags of 
the Crispians pepper, for transport, to Francis West at 17^. per lb. 
at three six months, William Kendall being tendered as security ; 
the Court approves. Steevens is directed to survey the Hopewell 
and give an estimate of the cost of her repair this day sennight. 
The account of Trumball's goods amounts to five tons ; but he is 
allowed to pay freight on three tons only, as many of the said 
goods are damaged. John Hawkins to be paid 14/. for making 
two boats, he having already received 10/. Mr. Fotherby presents 
an estimate for repair of the wharf of the storehouse for mooring- 
cables, and is told to follow the directions of Alderman Gayre or 
of any Committee who shall be next at Blackwall. Mr. Biggs is 
complainedof for trenching on the Company's land by building, and 
permitting carts and carriages through the gate to the damage of 
the causeway, which is maintained at the Company's charge ; for 
redress of this, Fotherby is to give notice when a Court Baron is 
appointed to be held for the manor of Stepney. (i^/A) 

A Court of Committees, September 17, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 27). 

Steevens presents a valuation of the Hopewell and an estimate of 
the charge of her repair, made by John Suthin and Peter Pett, 
amounting to 492/., including 160/. for her hull and masts. It is 
decided to offer her for hire to the adventurers in the new voyage ; 
meanwhile Steevens is directed to repair and have the said ship 
launched within a month or five weeks, which he promises to do. 
Robert Dycer buys indigo at 7^. dd. per lb. at three six months, 
and offers Zachary Worth and Christopher Jenny as securities. 

^ This and the subsequent courts up to October i were held at Mr. Middleton's house. 
Probably this was due to the sickness (followed by death) at the Governor's house 
mentioned on September 17. The plague was prevalent at the time. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 191 

Mr. Deputy states that, because of the death of one of the Com- 
pany's servants at Sir Christopher Clitherow's house, the subscrip- 
tions have not come up to what was expected, for many who would 
have underwritten could not tell where to find the book ; he thinks 
therefore that it would be well to call a general court, tell them of 
this, and extend the time for subscriptions ; this being approved, 
a general court is appointed to be held next Thursday afternoon 
at Mr, Middleton's house. All the Company's pepper, including 
what was shipped in the Margaret Constance (master, Nicholas 
Read) and Hopewell, is sold to Alderman Clarke and Mr. Richard 
Middleton, to be disposed of as they please. Sir John Wolsten- 
holme is entreated to wait on the Lord Keeper when he comes to 
town (which he is expected to do about next Tuesday), concern- 
ing the letter he received from the King with regard to the expor- 
tation of foreign commodities. {^\pp) 

A General Court, September 23, 1641 {Conrt Book, vol. 
xviii, p. 29). 

Mr. Deputy states that this court has been called to consider the 
Particular Voyage intended this year, as the time allotted for sub- 
scriptions has passed, and many affirm that they knew not where to 
find the book in which to underwrite, it having been removed from 
Sir Christopher Clitherow's house, and others have underwritten 
since the said time has expired ; therefore the generality are called 
together to decide whether such subscriptions shall hold good, and 
the limited time be extended, so that any wishing to adventure in 
this Voyage may do so. Both these questions are unanimously 
replied to in the affirmative, and it is agreed that the time shall be 
extended to the evening of the 4th of October, after which date no 
one is to be permitted to underwrite ; the book for subscriptions to 
remain until then at Mr. Sambrooke's house in Coleman Street. 
Mr. Deputy intimates that some exception has been taken to the 
sale of all the pepper and an offer made to give \d. per lb. more 
than was given for 150 bags. The buyers, Alderman Clarke and 
Mr. Middleton hereupon offer to relinquish their bargain ; but by 
a general erection of hands it is agreed to and confirmed. {'^\pp-) 



192 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, October i, 1641 {Court Book, vol. 
xviii, p. 31). 

Mr. Williams requesting extension of time for the pepper he 
bought last February, he is told that the purchase having been 
made at a general court such a court alone can give the desired 
permission, but that doubtless at their next meeting they will do 
so ; meanwhile a warrant is made out for delivery of the pepper. 
The Court, observing that the subscriptions for the Particular 
Voyage are not large enough to perform the work in the manner 
desired, thinks fit to call the new adventurers together and propose 
an enlargement of their subscriptions, to which end a Court of 
Committees is appointed to be held next Wednesday morning, and 
in the afternoon a court of the new adventurers, both at Sir Chris- 
topher Clitherow's house ; bills to this effect are ordered to be set 
up at the Exchange. Mr. Deputy desires liberty to sell to a friend 
some of the Company's indigo at the same price and time as that 
he bought at the last court of sales. As many who have under- 
written for this Particular Voyage are not free of the Company, 
and so by its charter not allowed to trade to the Indies, and seeing 
that none will be desirous at this time to pay for this freedom at the 
accustomed rate, it is resolved that all in this position who have 
underwritten for 500/. and upwards shall be made free on giving 
some small acknowledgement. Messrs. Markham and Sambrooke 
are desired to examine the books and what is remaining at Bantam 
and Surat upon the Joint Stock, and report next Wednesday if 
possible. All the stony pepper is sold to Mr. Benjamin Charke at 
6^. per lb. {%\pp) 

Sir William Boswell at the Hague to Sir Thomas Roe, 
October ^, 1641 {Public Record Office: Dom. Chas. /, vol. 
cccclxxxiv. No. 59). 

Nothing is yet done here in the Merchant Adventurers' cause ; 
as little in the East India business, these standing upon our 
quitting Polorung — thinking perhaps they may have anything if 
they stand upon it — and I neither having power to relinquish the 
right thereof, nor holding it fit that we should ever be so mean- 
hearted as to leave our first footing in those parts, and so entirely 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 193 

ours hy jure et facto, delivered to our merchants on His Majesty's 
behalf by the inhabitants, secundum mores patrios et majorum, 
before the Hollanders had footing thereabouts. Would we were 
once more upon our right legs at home, as I hope we shall be. 

(3//-) 

A Court of Committees, October 6, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 33). 

The Court orders that those mariners belonging to the pinnace 
Comfort (' taken by the Mallabars ') who have not already been 
paid are to receive their wages. Mr, Deputy is granted per- 
mission to sell thirty barrels of the Company's indigo to a friend. 
Consideration had of the renewal of the Company's charter ; the 
Court directs that those privileges already granted, with those 
desired, shall, with the advice of the Recorder and Serjeant 
Pheasant, be drawn up in the form of a bill for presentation to 
Parliament, with a short petition to entreat favour for furtherance 
of the said bill. An offer having been made for the defective 
ordnance, certain of the Committees are desired to see that it is 
sold to the best advantage. Anne, wife of William Pearse, a 
factor at Jambi, presents a letter of attorney from her husband to 
Mr. Franklyn, one of the warders of the Tower ; the Court orders 
her to be paid 50/. upon account of her husband's wages, on 
condition that a bond is given for repayment if it shall be found 
upon return of the accounts that Pearse is in the Company's debt. 
It is resolved to send the Hopeiucll to the Coast, Steevens promising 
to have her ready within the month. He is directed to try the 
experiment of mingling ground or beaten glass with ' the stuffe 
that brimms the shippe',^ in order to preserve her from the worm. 
William Batt to be given 15/. for recovering one of the Company's 
anchors which was lost at ' Gore end '. After some debate it is 
resolved to abandon the idea of freighting ships for the intended 
Voyage to the northwards and southwards, notwithstanding the 
opinion of some that doing so would save about 600/. yearly ; for it 
is thought better to use the Company's own ships rather than let 
them rot or sell them to disadvantage, as although freighted ships 

^ To ' brim ' or ' brime ' a ship was to bum off an old coating of pitch ; but here tlie 
term is evidently extended to the subsequent process of re-coating ihe surface. 



194 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

receiving their lading on arrival at the several ports would be best 
and cheapest, yet, on the other hand, should they not do so but 
have to go from port to port and wait for it, then the charge for 
demurrage would be as great if not greater than the charge of 
the Company's own ships. It is also resolved that a factor shall 
be sent in each ship, who shall return and give account of all 
particular passages in the voyage. {l\pp-) 

A General Court of the New Adventurers in a 
Particular Voyage for this present Year, October 6, 
1 641 {Cotirt Book, vol. xviii, p. 37). 

Mr. Governor expresses a wish that the assembly were larger, 
as the business of the day is of very great importance, for the book 
for subscriptions to raise stock for the Particular Voyage to the East 
Indies this year has been open a good while but the time for 
underwriting expired last Monday evening. About 67,500/. has 
been underwritten for by ninety persons ; so this meeting has been 
called to obtain advice in the ordering and management of the 
business. The preamble to the book of subscriptions having been 
read, a question is asked whether any sum has been underwritten 
for not in accordance therewith ; whereupon it appears that Mr. 
Methwold has, with the consent of the Court of Committees, under- 
written for 2,000/. on behalf of William Fremlyn, President of 
Surat ; this subscription the court will not allow, and so to avoid 
all dispute Mr. Methwold vacates it. It is also found that Richard 
"Wild has underwritten for 500/. with a proviso ; the proviso is read 
and Mr. Wild told that if he will omit it he may adventure, but not 
unless ; this he consents to do, whereupon by general consent it is 
decided that all subscriptions must be agreeable to the tenor of the 
preamble. The Governor desires to know who is to be appointed 
Treasurer, where the money is to be received, and how disposed of. 
Sir Nicholas Crispe remarks that he does not know whose fault it 
is, but something has been done to make this trade less profitable 
than others ; he does not wish to lay the blame on the Governor, 
the Deputy, or the Committees, all of whom he regards as worthy 
men ; he himself has been a Committee for many years and knows 
that they are not favoured any more than the least adventurer ; it 
may be the number of managers (why should not six do as much 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 195 

as twenty?) or the charge ; if the latter, it should be lessened ; in 
his opinion they have nothing to do with Blackwall, and his advice 
is ' not to looke after magnificence, but proffitt ', and to choose 
six men to do all things concerning this present business. The 
Governor is of opinion that the example of the three Persia Voyages 
may be of use ; these were managed by the Governor, the Deputy, 
and twenty-four Committees at a charge of one and one and a half 
per cent. ; so that if 60,000/. can be sent out for 600/. (which is but 
one per cent.) it is so small a matter that none can cavil at it. This 
proposal of one per cent, causes much dispute, and after a long 
debate the Governor by desire puts it to the question whether the 
Old Stock shall be allowed one per cent, upon the quick stock to 
be sent out for managing this Particular Voyage, instead of all 
standing charges at home, as gratification to the managers of this 
business, house-rent, use of the yard at Blackwall, and all ofificers' 
wages; and by a general erection of hands the said allowance is 
consented to. The Court thinks fit to elect eight of the new sub- 
scribers to be 'as Comittees at large', to join with the standing 
committee and to meet every Friday morning, or as often as shall 
be necessary, to consult concerning this Particular Voyage. From 
those nominated the following are chosen : Sir Nicholas Crispe, 
Messrs. George Francklyn, Thomas Burnell, Nathan Wright, Robert 
Sainthill, Roger Vivian, Robert Gardner, and Robert Abdy. Robert 
Bateman is appointed Treasurer, and it is ordered that the time for 
the first payment shall be between to-day and Monday fortnight ; 
the other three according to the preamble ; and that no money 
shall be paid in upon discount for this Voyage without further 
order. (4//.) 

'A Generall Court of the Adventurers in the Third 
JOYNT Stocke/ October 7, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 41). 

Mr. Governor relates what was decided yesterday at a general 
court held by the underwriters in the Particular Voyage, including 
the allowance of one per cent, to the Old Stock for home expenses. 
The Governor puts the acceptance of these terms to the court and 
they are generally consented to. It is further resolved, in case of 
any difference arising between the Committees and the eight 
elected by the subscribers to the Particular Voyage, that eight 

O 2, 



196 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

more men be chosen who are interested equally in the Third 
Joint Stock and in this new venture, and to these sixteen 'or to 
the major part of each side' all such differences shall be referred. 
The following are nominated : — Sir John Wolstenholme, Aldermen 
Gay re and Reynardson, Messrs. Wilson, Langham, Ash well, Meth- 
wold, and Massingbird. (i| pp) 

' A Court of Committees and of the Mixt Committees 
FOR the Perticular Voyage,' October 8, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 44). 

Robert, Nicholas, Roger, and John, sons of the late Alderman 
Abdy, are admitted by patrimony^to the freedom of the Company ; 
also William Cockayne, son of the Deputy Governor, and Nathaniel, 
son of Richard Wich. William Corderoy, formerly an apprentice 
to the Deputy, is admitted by service, and Ozias Churchman, 
Cordwell Hamond, and Jeffery Rowland, having each underwritten 
500/. in this Particular Voyage, are admitted on payment of 5/. 
apiece. Mr. Methwold being entreated, in respect of his experience, 
to give his opinion as to the best way of managing the stock newly 
subscribed, says that upon the resolution of the Company to send 
out no more stock he had often thought how this East India trade 
might be upheld and had conceived a model both as to a stock and 
a voyage, and told Sir Henry Garway, Mr. Langham, and Mr. 
Kerridge, and they approving he set it forth in a letter and sent it to 
Surat, knowing the President there to be a man of experience and 
ability. But as the stock now underwritten for falls far short of his 
expectation, he proposes that a ship be sent forthwith to the Coast 
of Coromandel with a stock of 15,000/. or 20,000/., and that notice 
be sent by her to the President of Surat what stock is to be 
dispatched there next spring ; in his opinion a ship of about 
400 tons with stock to the value of 30,000/. would suffice, and 
15,000/. worth would be enough for Bantam. This proposal is 
variously received ; some suggest that it would be well, if the stock 
is too little, to consider how it may be enlarged ; while another 
raises the question of freighting ships ; but finally it is agreed to 
consider the design of the voyage and not to think about freighting 
ships until the spring, for as a vessel must be dispatched speedily, 
it will be best to send one of the Company's. Dispute ensues 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 197 

whether to send the Hopeivell; and on Andrew Trumball giving 
a good account of her and offering to serve again as master, and 
the report of her survey and cost for reparation being approved, 
it is decided to send her to the Coast for this Voyage, with sixty 
men and provisions for eighteen months. Thereupon some of the 
Committees are desired to see to the provision of beer, bread, beef, 
pork, wine, &c., and to survey the said ship when they are at 
leisure to go to Blackvvall, that she may be prepared with all 
convenient speed. Andrew Trumball is re-entertained as master at 
7/. per month, with liberty to carry private trade to the value of 
100/., on condition that he does not invest in any of the Company's 
commodities and gives in an account of what he takes out and the 
profit he makes on it ; and if at the end of the voyage he is found 
to have behaved well and made the Downs his first port, he shall 
be remembered ; and now as a token of respect he is made a free 
brother of the Company by service. The Court resuming con- 
sideration of the smallness of the recent subscriptions, it is agreed 
that any subscriber in this Particular Voyage may add up to half 
as much again to his original sum, and it is resolved that decisions 
herein be declared by next Thursday evening. A general court 
of the underwriters in this Particular Voyage to confirm the above 
is appointed to be held this afternoon. (4^ //.) 

A General Court of the New Adventurers, October 8, 
1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 48}. 

Mr. Governor relates how the Standing and the Mixed Com- 
mittees met this morning to settle important business concerning 
this Particular Voyage, when it was debated whether to enlarge the 
Stock underwritten for (it being only 65,000/.), and allow all those 
free of the Company to subscribe, or only those who have already 
done so ; and it was thought that those who had ' broken the ice ' 
were entitled to enlarge their subscriptions if they pleased, for if 
there is any hope of benefit they should be the first to reap it. 
The resolution on this point, arrived at by this morning's court, 
that every one who has underwritten in this Particular Voyage may 
enlarge his adventure fifty per cent,, but no more, is read and put 
by the Governor to this court and by general consent agreed to. 
Sir Nicholas Crispe remarks that as it has been agreed to give to 



198 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

the Third Joint Stock one per cent, upon the quick stock sent from 
England, it is necessary to consider what shall be given to the 
factors in India, for, whether this Voyage proceeds or not, the 
charge lies on the Third Joint Stock. This causes much debate, 
some thinking that allowance should be made to the Old Stock in 
proportion to what is sent out to each place ; thus at Surat, where 
the employment might be equal, the charge should be equal, but at 
Bantam and Masulipatam, where there will be little to do for the 
Old Stock, more should be allowed by this Particular Voyage. 
Finally, this question is referred to the eight Committees chosen to 
join with the Standing Committees, to be by them considered and 
reported on as soon as possible. (2//.) 

A Court of Committees, October 13, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 50), 

Alderman Thomas Atkins is admitted to the freedom of the 
Company by redemption, paying 5/. Sir John Wolstenholme, 
Alderman Gayre, Captain Stiles, Messrs. Ashwell, Methwold, and 
Massingbird, with any other of the Committees, are desired to 
meet and consider the alteration of the Company's charter and 
prepare the same for presentation to Parliament. Thomas Clarke, 
late a factor at Masulipatam, to be given 5/. on account. Thomas 
Mooreton and Elizabeth his wife, formerly widow and admini- 
stratrix of Nicholas Gove, to be paid 114/. is. in full of all wages 
and debts due to the said Gove on giving a general release to the 
Company, though if anything more from this estate shall come 
into the Company's hands it shall be paid to the said administra- 
trix, (i /.) 

'A Court of Committees and of the Mixt Committees 
FOR this Perticular Voyage,' October 15, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 51). 

Aldermen Wollaston and Adams, Messrs. Richard Bogan and 
Richard Glover admitted to the freedom of the Company by 
redemption, paying 5/. each ; Edward Lewes and Thomas Corbet, 
formerly apprentices to the late Matthew Cradocke, admitted by 
service ; and the like freedom bestowed upon Thomas Rilston, the 
Husband, who has served the Company about sixteen years. The 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 199 

Court, finding that the addition agreed upon at the last general 
court does not bring the subscription up to above 8o,oco/., and 
thinking this too small a stock with which to prosecute this year's 
trade, takes into consideration the best way to advance this sum to 
100,000/. It is suggested that, as many who are free of the Com- 
pany take exception at not being permitted to underwrite for this 
Voyage, everyone be allowed to do so, provided he announces his 
intention by a fixed date, ' for the Parliament they aime at liberty 
of trade/ and it is but justice to admit every free brother. It is 
also observed that as the book for subscriptions has remained open 
so long, and notices to this effect have been set up at the Exchange 
for many days, naming the date fixed for closing the list, no man 
has cause of complaint, and the addition wanted should be left to 
those who have already subscribed, for if all are admitted the 
stock may exceed 100,000/. To this it is answered that it would 
be better to have 30,000/. too much than 5,000/. too little ; and 
finally it is agreed that the present subscribers may enlarge their 
subscriptions as much as they please, and on the result being made 
known, if the amount does not come up to 100,000/. then all who 
have given in their names shall be permitted to underwrite for the 
sums they propose, and if the desired total is not reached then, 
every free brother shall be allowed to underwrite, but the total 
subscription not to exceed 100,000/. ; 'hee that comes first to bee 
first served.' It is decided that the Beadle shall summon a court 
of the adventurers in this Voyage to meet to-morrow morning at 
8 o'clock, in order to inform them of the foregoing and to hear 
their resolution on the same. It is next considered what ships to 
send out upon this Voyage besides the Hopezvell, and it is thought 
fit that two of 400 and 300 tons respectively should be sent to 
Surat. The Crispian, belonging to the Third Joint Stock, is pro- 
posed, and as ships suitable to be freighted the Caesar, Lofidon, 
Unicorn, Endeavour, ExeJiange, and Aleppo Merchant are named. 
It is agreed to send one of these next spring to Surat ; and as this 
will admit of no delay Mr. Deputy and certain Committees are 
desired to treat with the masters or owners of the said vessels, or 
of any others offered for freighting, and make such agreement 
as they think fit for the dispatch of one ship this year to Surat. 
Steevens, the Company's shipwright, is to be directed to look out 



200 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

for a vessel of 200 or 220 tons which may be fitted for Bantam 
by the middle of November, and three of the Committees are 
desired to provide canvas for sails. The mixed committee is 
desired to meet the standing committee this and Wednesday after- 
noon to confer about the alteration of the Company's charter ; 
meanwhile Messrs. Bowen and Sambrooke are directed to peruse 
the letters and accounts in order to see what factors are at each 
factory and what stock there is remaining in India. (3 //.) 

*A Generall Court of the Adventurers in this Per- 
TicuLER Voyage,' October 16, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, 
P- 54). 

The Governor states that this court has been called in order to 
be made acquainted with some passages in this Particular Voyage 
now in agitation. The amount at first subscribed was not above 
65,000/. ; which being thought too little, the time for subscribing 
was extended, but only to those who had already done so. By 
this means about 15,000/. was added, making a total of 80,450/. ; 
but this sum was also considered too small to prosecute this year's 
trade, and at yesterday's court it was debated how best to raise it 
to 100,000/, The Governor refers this point to the consideration of 
this present court, adding that if none are willing to subscribe 
more, there are many free of the Company who have been left out, 
though they have sent in their names with the sums they are 
willing to adventure, amounting in all to 1 2,000/., but the Court of 
Committees and the Mixed Committees would do nothing without 
the consent of this court. The Governor adds that yesterday, when 
this matter was in dispute, there was thought to be too much stock 
to carry on part of the trade this year, but too little to undertake 
the whole to the northwards and southwards ; therefore it was 
thought expedient to enlarge it, as the larger the stock the greater 
will be the profit, and it is better to have too much than too little. 
For these reasons it was thought fit to extend the time of subscrip- 
tion a few days in order to advance it to 100,000/. After much 
debate it is resolved that liberty shall be given until next Wed- 
nesday to the present subscribers to enlarge their subscriptions; 
and if they do not bring up the amount to 100,000/., then all free 
of the Company, including those who have already sent in their 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 201 

names, shall be allowed to underwrite for what they please, if they 
give notice of the same by Thursday evening ; but the total is not 
to exceed 100,000/., when the book is to be closed. Any one 
underwriting for another must make good the sum in case of 
default. The time for the first payment of the subscriptions shall 
be Thursday come sennight and the three other payments to be 
according to the preamble ; and if any one fails to make his first 
payment on the appointed day, his name shall be crossed out and 
he shall not be admitted to adventure in this Voyage. (2//.) 

A Court of Committees, October 20, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 57). 

Edward and Thomas Steevens and Andrew Trumball are desired 
to view the Ulysses, or any ship suitable to be sent to Bantam, and 
report to the court next Friday. Francis Day to be paid all wages 
and debts due unto him, on sealing a bond, with Mr. Methwold as 
his security, to save the Company harmless from 1,500 rials of 
eight, a supposed error in his accounts, which he is to make good 
if it shall justly appear to be in his accounts since his departure 
from the Coast, [^ p-) 

A General Court of Sales, October 21, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 58). 

Sale of stony, long, and light pepper, dust of wet and dry 
pepper, gum-lac, sugar, 'aloes succatrina', cubebs, dust of cloves, 
and cotton wool, with prices and names of purchasers, (i /,) 

'A Court of Committees and of the Mixt Committees,' 
October 22, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 59), 

Certain of the Committees are desired to hire mariners for this 
Particular Voyage. Thomas Handson and Thomas Thatcher are 
accepted as securities for long pepper and dust of cloves. Mr, Man's 
parcel of coral to be examined with the help of Francis Day, and 
if found suitable and the price reasonable to be bought for the 
Company, Robert Smith, John Brett, Thomas Princcps, and 
Richard Hunt, having underwritten for 500/. in this Particular 
Voyage, are admitted to the freedom of the Company by redcmp- 



203 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

tlon, each paying 5/. ; Henry, son of Robert Bowyer, is admitted by 
patrimony ; Francis Day, who has served the Company as a factor 
seven years, and Edward Browne, formerly an apprentice to Sir 
James Cambell, are admitted by service. Certain Committees are 
desired to endeavour to settle the difference between James Cox 
and the Company. Francis Day, being well experienced in the 
trade on the Coast, and having underwritten for 500/. in this 
Voyage, is nominated to go as factor in the Hopewell, to take 
account of the voyage and return in her ; he is asked what salary 
he would expect for this service, and replies 200/. a year, with 
liberty to carry out private trade to the value of 100/. Being 
requested to withdraw, consideration is had of the great wrong 
done to the Company by this practice of private trade, especially 
when indulged in by factors, and it is unanimously resolved that 
henceforth no factor shall be permitted any private trade either in 
the outward or homeward voyage or when in the Indies. It is 
further resolved to give Day 400/., should this voyage be con- 
cluded in eighteen, nineteen, or twenty months ; and in the event 
of it continuing more than two years, at the expiration of that time 
to allow him 200/. per annum, on condition that if he indulges in 
private trade either directly or indirectly he shall not only forfeit 
his wages but his adventure of 500/. also. The Governor acquaints 
Mr. Day with these resolutions, and he willingly accepts the salary 
and promises faithfully to obey all commands and directions, but 
requests permission to take out a pipe or two of wine and a butt or 
two of beer to give to some friends at the Coast, and asks the Com- 
pany to take some cloths off his hands, which he knows will sell 
very well there ; the Court promises that the cloths shall be viewed 
and answer given him concerning them, but with regard to the 
wine and beer no resolution is arrived at. On Day's departure 
Andrew Trumball is called in and told of the entertainment of the 
former with the accompanying conditions ; he is enjoined to be 
very circumspect and hinder all attempts at private trade as much 
as possible, more especially as he is favoured by being allowed to 
take out some to the value of 100/. Trumball declares that, if he 
does not act up to these injunctions, it will be just for him to 
forfeit his adventure also. After much debate it is generally 
agreed that a ship of between 200 tons and 330 tons shall be 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 203 

bought to be dispeeded to Bantam ; and some of the Committees 
are entreated to look out for such a vessel, and that no time may 
be lost others are desired to see that all necessary provisions are 
speedily prepared for her. (3I//.) 

'A Court of Committees and of the Mixt Committees,' 
October 27, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p, 62). 

At the request of Mr. John Diggs that the differences in question 
between his father, the late Sir Dudley Diggs, and the Company 
may be settled, Alderman Reynardson, William Ashwell, and 
William Garvvay are directed to do this if possible, and if not to 
report concerning the matter. Mr. Pinson desiring that his accounts 
with the Company may be cleared, he is told that when he gives 
a written answer to the objections made against him this shall be 
done ; whereupon he promises that the same shall be ready by 
this day sennight. Stephen Bolton and Thomas Bromfeild, having 
each underwritten for 500/. in this Particular Voyage, are admitted 
to the freedom of the Company on payment of 5/. apiece ; Ben- 
jamin De La Noy, formerly apprentice to Derricke Host, is 
admitted by service ; and Samuel, son of Francis Manning, by 
patrimony. Richard and Thomas Allen and William Shower 
accepted as securities for pepper. A letter is read from Richard 
Wild, expressing his readiness to end the differences by submitting 
himself to the judgement of the Court ; the Committees, inclined 
to favour him as much as possible without waiving the general 
release already given by him, order a warrant to be made out for 
his first division according to his subscription ; and as some of 
the points in dispute can only be settled by a general court, 
certain Committees are desired to prepare this business by the 
next general court. Mr. Garvvay 's question, whether the coral 
bought at Leghorn shall be brought to England as the adventure 
of the Third Joint Stock or of this Particular Voyage, is referred 
to the consideration of the Standing and Mixed Committees, who 
arc to meet this afternoon. There being so much business in 
agitation, it is resolved that courts be held three times a week, 
on Mondays, Wednesdays and P'ridays.and the Mixed Committees 
are to attend all until the Hopewell is dispeeded. The buying or 
freighting of a ship to be sent to Bantam is left to the discretion 



304 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

of the Committees appointed to consider this matter at the last 
court, {ipp-) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
October 30, 1641 [Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 6-^). 

The Court considers a motion made on behalf of Lord Say and 
Seale, who desires to underwrite for 2,000/. in this Particular 
Voyage, he having been out of town and not knowing of the book 
which had been kept open for subscriptions. The Committees 
present incline to concede His Lordship's request, as he is always 
ready to perform any good office for the Company, but there not 
being a full court decision herein is deferred. A letter is read 
from Edward Misselden, desiring the favour of the Company with 
respect to the brokes incurred on his adventure during his absence 
abroad, and stating his readiness to serve the Company at all 
times, and that for some such services he has incurred the ill will 
of great men, both at home and abroad. Mr. Sambrooke reports 
that the said brokes only amount to 17/. or 18/., and Sir John 
Wolstenholme promises to inform Misselden of this and hear 
what he has to say. (i p.) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
November i, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 66). 

After much debate it is resolved that the cost of the coral 
bought at Leghorn shall be borne by this Particular Voyage and 
not by the Old Stock, the court taking into consideration the good 
to be reaped by having such a commodity ready bought, which 
never yields less than eighty per cent, profit, sometimes even 
a hundred ; therefore it is decided to pay the Third Joint Stock 
for it out of the second payment due next Christmas at the rate 
of 4^-. 6d. per dollar, all charges included, when the coral is shipped. 
Certain Committees are desired to provide forty or fifty broad- 
cloths to be sent in the Hopewell to the Coast, and to examine 
and buy those offered by Francis Day, if they are suitable ; others 
are desired to buy quicksilver, vermilion, and elephants' teeth for 
dispatch in the same vessel ; and Mr. Bowen and the Husband, 
with the advice of Mr. Day, to provide looking-glass, 'ammell' 
[enamel], amber, and knives. {}\pp-) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 305 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
November 3, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 68). 

Peter, son of Giles Vandepitt, and Edward Ford, who have 
underwritten for 500/. in this Particular Voyage, are admitted to 
the freedom of the Company on payment of 5/. each. The Court 
resolves to send 15,000/. quick stock in the Hopewell to the Coast. 
Francis Day is permitted to pay in his subscription of 500/. to this 
Particular Voyage upon discount. {\ p) 

' A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
November 6, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 69). 

Mr. Ashwell reports that he with Messrs. Methwold and Vivian 
treated this morning with Messrs. Fownes, Yard, and Man about 
buying the ship John and Thomas, now in St. Saviour's dock, 
agreeing to give for her 2,800/., half to be paid within a week after 
she has been viewed, the remainder about the middle of next 
January. The Court approves and orders the said ship to be 
examined next Monday by Steevens, the shipwright, John Muck- 
nell (whom it is proposed to elect as her master for the voyage to 
Bantam), and Boatswain Ingram ; if she is found fit for the Com- 
pany's service, they are to sail her down to Blackwall ; she shall 
be allowed sixty-five men and be provisioned for eighteen months. 
Ordered that the proportion of men for the Hopeivcll be fifty-five. 
Certain Committees are entreated to read the Company's letters 
and report on the quantity of cordage and other stores sent for 
Bantam in the Reformation, William^ and Mary, and the number 
of men remaining after the sailing of the ships ; while Messrs. Sam- 
brooke and Markham are requested to give an account of the 
stock remaining at Surat and Bantam after the departure from 
thence of the last ships, and of the tonnage at both places to bring 
away the said stock. Roger Calcott, administrator to Robert 
Coulson, to be paid 20/., part of the said Coulson's estate, and given 
the rings in custody of the Company. The accusations from the 
Black Book against Gerald Pinson, with his written answers to 
each, are read ; and since the Court wishes to settle with him, 
as he has served the Company sixteen years in India and has now 
been home seventeen months, Sambrooke is directed to prepare an 



2o6 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

account of his salary by next Monday, and Markham to read the 
account of the expenses at the Coast during his agency there, with 
the letter from the President and Council at Bantam on his return, 
that this matter may be determined. Ten tons of lead, at lo/. i6s. 
per ton, bought frdm Gilbert Moorewood to be shipped in the 
Hopewell. {2 pp.) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
November 8, 1641 [Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 71). 

Upon the minutes of the court at which Lord Say desired to 
underwrite for 2,000/. in this Particular Voyage being read, in- 
formation is given that Lord Brookes is also desirous of subscribing 
1,000/. to the same Voyage, he too having been out of town at the 
time the book for subscriptions was open and not knowing of it ; 
whereupon Sir Nicholas Crispe and Mr, Deputy are requested to 
wait on Lord Say and ask him to underwrite for the 3,000/, viz., 
2,000/. for himself and 1,000/ for Lord Brookes. Consideration is 
then had of what ships are fitting to be sent out this year for this 
Particular Voyage besides the Hopetuell designed for the Coast and 
the vessel bought from Mr. Man and intended for Bantam. After 
much dispute it is resolved to send two ships to Surat, one to be 
set out by the Company and the other to be freighted, both to 
be about 400 tons burden. It is proposed that the Company shall 
send the Crispian, as she has been valued and is now in dock being 
repaired ; but the Court, not wishing to prejudice either the Old 
Stock or this Particular Voyage, desires that the Mixed Com- 
mittees appointed for the latter and the eight appointed by the 
adventurers in the Third Joint Stock, or as many of them as can, 
should go to-morrow to Blackwall, view the said ship, and report 
their opinions next Wednesday. A debate follows concerning the 
ship to be freighted, when the London, the Unicorn, the Efideavour, 
the Aleppo Merchant, the Freeman and the Caesar are named ; to 
avoid loss of time all the Committees are requested to endeavour 
to arrive at some agreement with the master or owner of one 
of these ships, or of any vessel of about 400 tons burden, that one 
may be freighted for Surat. The Court also resolves to have the 
principal care of whosoever goes as master in this ship, as also 
the approving of two of his mates, and decides that for every 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 207 

hundred tons burden twenty men shall be allowed and so in pro- 
portion, and that none shall be left in the country ; and that in case 
it is necessary to freight a ship for Bantam then twenty-two men 
shall be allowed for every hundred tons ; but this is left for future 
discussion. The tonnage for Surat is considered, and in particular 
the number of calicoes to be reckoned as a ton, and it is decided 
that 600 pieces, one with another, fine, coarse, broad or narrow, 
shall be accounted as one ton, and that the rest of the goods shall 
be reckoned according to the Turkey tonnage. Certain Com- 
mittees are requested to buy sixty cloths to be sent this year to 
Surat, of the colours specified in the last advices, and these 
Mr. Bowen is to write out ; and Gilbert Moorewood is desired 
to provide 600 pigs of lead. All applicants for the place of purser 
or steward in the Hopewell to attend the court next Wednesday, 
the day appointed for election. Mr. Holloway moves for a ship of 
400 or 500 tons to be prepared for dispatch to Bantam, he sup- 
posing that there will be more goods ready at that place than the 
ships there will be able to bring away, and promising that, if his 
supposition is wrong, and the ships return with dead freight, he will 
make good the damage ; the Court approves and promises to con- 
sider this matter. Mr. Deputy reports that a friend of his has 
offered 4^. per lb. for the Company's cloves and to pay for them 
before Christmas ; he is desired to try to induce his friend to raise 
the price and told that this business shall be concluded at the next 
court. (3^//.) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
November 10, 1641 {Coiu't Book, vol. xviii, p. 75). 

The Court, understanding that the Hopeivell is launched, orders 
that her mariners be paid their imprest money next Monday. 
Arthur Bulkly, well recommended by Robert and Richard Bate- 
man, is entertained as purser for the Hopeivell, and Henry Bassano, 
late steward's mate in the Crispian^ as steward, on condition that 
they do all in their power to hinder private trade (which if they 
indulge in themselves they forfeit their wages), and enter into 
a bond with security to this effect ; they willingly agree and accept 
the places. Bulkley is told to take an inventory of all stores and 



2o8 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

provisions in the ship ; so that at his return home he may be able 
to render an account of everything taken from or put into the 
Hopewell, to the end that this Voyage may not wrong the Third 
Joint Stock or vice versa. Messrs. Wright and Vivian are desired 
to take whom they please of the Committees or shipwrights and 
go to Blackwall to view the Crispiaji, and report by next Friday as 
to her suitability for dispatch to Surat upon this Particular Voyage, 
and if they do not think her fit for this purpose to seek for some 
other vessel. Upon notice that the Blessing, bought from Messrs. 
Fownes and Yard, is, in the opinion of Steevens and others, fit for 
the Company's service, John Mucknell is ordered, with the assist- 
ance of Boatswain Ingram, to take her at the first opportunity to 
one of the large docks at Blackwall. The Court considers Mr. IIol- 
loway's proposition made at the last court to send a ship to Bantam 
upon the Third Joint Stock's account, when he promised to make 
good all loss should she return with a dead freight, which promise 
he now withdraws unless the Company will agree to send 5,000/. 
stock in the ship towards procuring her lading for Europe ; after 
some debate Mr. Deputy puts it to the question whether in the 
opinion of those present there will be stock at Bantam more than 
sufficient to lade the 1,600 tons of shipping now there, and the 
majority reply in the negative. Henry Fetherstone, who has 
underwritten for 500/. in this Particular Voyage, is admitted to the 
freedom of the Company by redemption on paying 5/. Francis 
Day to be refunded 427/. i8i-., paid by him for cloth. Resolved 
that the following conditions be agreed upon between the Company 
and the masters or owners of ships to be freighted, viz., for Surat 
twenty men to every hundred tons : the ship to sail from Gravesend 
the first of March and be laden from Surat the last of January, if 
not sooner : the tonnage to be reckoned after the Turkey tonnage : 
the ship to be furnished with money for supply of provisions in the 
country at ^s. per dollar : no primage to be given : two mates to 
be approved by the Company and no private trade permitted. For 
Bantam twenty-two men for every hundred tons ; all other con- 
ditions to be the same as those for Surat, except as regards the 
time for departure and return of the ship. (3^ pp.) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 209 

A Court of Committees, November 12, 1641 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 78). 

An application regarding the estate of the late Robert Coulson 
is referred to Messrs. Ashwell and Middleton, who before examined 
these accounts. Certain Committees, two to be adventurers in the 
Old Stock and two in this Particular Voyage, are directed to treat 
with Captain John Steevens, commander of the London, or with 
any other owner of shipping, about freighting a ship for Surat, and 
if no agreement is come to, to see about buying a vessel for the 
purpose. Mr. Blunt, on behalf of one who wishes to remain anony- 
mous, offers to buy all the Company's cloves at 4^'. ^\d. per lb. on 
condition of being made a free brother gratis ; but this price is 
considered too low. As none of the Mixed Committees are present, 
the Court directs that they be asked to attend next Monday, in order 
that the allowance to be made to the Old Stock for their factors and 
other assistance in this Particular Voyage may be resolved on. The 
motion made to appoint Gerald Pinson to go in this voyage in the 
John and Thomas to Bantam, thence to Surat and back to Bantam 
and return home in the same ship, is approved but not resolved 
on. The Court orders the John and Thomas [the ' Blessing ' in the 
margin] to be brimmed with broken glass ; and certain rumoured 
misbehaviour of Andrew Coggan to be examined into. (2//.) 

' A Court of Committees and of the Mixt Committees,' 
November 15, 1641 (Coro^t Book, vol. xviii, p. 80). 

Bread and beer to be allowed to the men employed in the Hope- 
zvell, to obviate the necessity of their going ashore for dinner. 
Mr. Wright reports that he and Mr. Vivian with some 'seamen' 
have viewed the Crisp ian and find that she may be serviceable 
for a voyage of thirty-three months, but he desires that two adven- 
turers in the Third Joint Stock and two in this Particular Voyage 
may be nominated to make a new valuation of her hull and of all 
her provisions. This being approved of, Peter Pett and John 
Southam are appointed for the Third Joint Stock and Captain 
Jourden and Captain Crawly for the Particular Voyage ; and certain 
other Committees are requested to go with them to Blackwall 
when this valuation is to be made. To prevent loss of time in 



aio COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

dispatch of this ship, the remaining Committees are desired to see 
that beef and pork be provided for ninety men for eighteen months. 
Mr. Vivian is directed to come prepared next Wednesday with his 
proposition to freight the Aleppo Merchajit for Surat, and Mr. Bate- 
man, one of the owners of the Endeavour, with his for freighting 
that ship, she being expected hourly from Hamburg. Francis Day 
is given leave to take with him in the Hopewell two butts of beer 
and one pipe of Canary wine free of freight, to be examined by one 
of the Committees before being shipped. The Court considers 
what allowance is to be made by this Particular Voyage to the 
Third Joint Stock for the assistance of its factors in the Indies, 
the use of its small shipping, warehouses, and all other helps ; and 
after long debate resolves that for all goods laden for Europe, a cer- 
tain sum, so much per cent., shall be paid in the Indies at the last 
port as the goods cost ' first penny ' ; but the exact amount not 
being agreed upon, Sir John Wolstenholme and the Committees nomi- 
nated by the general court are entreated to join with Sir Nicholas 
Crispe and the Committees appointed by the adventurers in this 
Particular Voyage to consider and resolve on this matter next 
Wednesday morning. {^\ pp-) 

* A Court of Committees and of the Mixt Committees,' 
November 17, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 82). 

Permission is given to a Persian and his servant to go in the 
Hopewell to the Coast of Coromandel, they to provide all their own 
food. James Woodcot to be paid 61. i^s. ^d. for salvage of cloves 
which were cast away in the Palsgrave at Plymouth, and for freight 
of sixteen pieces of linen from ' Rhone ' [Rouen ?] to London, which 
were bartered for the said cloves. William Boulton and William 
Christmas, having each underwritten for 500/. in this Particular 
Voyage, are admitted to the freedom of the Company by redemp- 
tion on payment of 5/. apiece. Debate is resumed as to what 
allowance shall be made to the Third Joint Stock by this Particular 
Voyage in return for the use of factors, warehouses, and all other 
accommodations in the Indies ; much diversity of opinion is ex- 
pressed, and it is proposed that the Mixed Committees, appointed 
by this Particular Voyage, now present should join with as many 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 211 

of the eight Standing Committees appointed by the Third Joint 
Stock as are in court, and withdraw to consider this point amongst 
themselves. This is done, and after much dispute it is agreed 
that this Particular Voyage shall allow six per cent, by way of 
* provision ' to the Third Joint Stock upon all goods laden for 
Europe as they cost first penny in the Indies, to be paid to the 
factors at the ports where the goods are laden, in return for the use 
of factors, warehouses, and all other accommodations belonging to 
the Third Joint Stock, together with the use of all small shipping, 
men, stores, and provisions in the ships or on shore, with all 
ammunition, cables, &c. ; but in case the said ships shall be in 
want of men, ammunition, and stores at the time this Particular 
Voyage has occasion to use them, these shall be supplyed by this 
Particular Voyage, which when completed may claim all things 
remaining so provided by it. Mr. Millett, master of the Aleppo 
Merchant, offers his ship upon freight for Surat, but the Court 
comes to no decision. {'2< pp) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
November 19, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 84). 

Francis Day is granted permission to take with him in the 
Hopewell as his servant Francis Day, Junior, a good writer and 
accountant, who is entertained at 20s. per month on condition that 
Mr. Day, Senior, stands security for his not indulging in private 
trade and for his returning in the same ship. A general court to be 
summoned for next Friday afternoon for the election of a Governor. 
Sir John Wolstenholme and Mr. Saynthill are desired to confer 
with Mr. Whitlocke and Mr. Maynard, members of the House of 
Commons, about the Privy Seal which is ready drawn concerning 
the return of impost upon the exportation of FLast India goods, 
and other particulars, that the House may be acquainted with the 
Company's desire and the same passed in the next Act granted to 
the King for tonnage and poundage. Messrs. Kerridge and Meth- 
wold are desired to meet Mr. Millett, a member of the Exchange, 
at the Exchange this afternoon, to endeavour to settle with him 
about freighting his ship, the Aleppo Merchant, for Surat. (i/.) 



P 3 



212 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
November 32, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 86). 

Mr. Methvvold desires that Mr. Fremlyn, President at Surat, may- 
be permitted to adventure 2,000/. in this Particular Voyage ; after 
consideration the Court consents to this, on condition that 
Mr. Fremlyn pays into the Company's cash at Surat 8,000 rials 
of eight ' Civill money', which at the rate of ^s. per rial is 2,000/. 
Mr. Methwold undertakes to make good this sum in case of 
default ; but, as the matter cannot be concluded without the con- 
sent of the adventurers in this Particular Voyage, who before 
refused to allow it, Mr. Deputy is requested to put it to the general 
court next Friday. Sir Nicholas Crispe reporting that he has 
underwritten for Lord Say in this Voyage i,oco/., this subscription 
is allowed and confirmed. Andrew Trumball to be given 50/. for 
making the Downs his first port on returning from the last voyage, 
and to be allowed, as formerly, a quarter cask of canary for this 
voyage. Mr. Saynthill offers the Experience or the Harry Bon- 
adventure for freighting to Surat, at 30/. per ton for all goods 
except pepper, for which he asks 20/. per ton, 16 cwt. to the ton, 
and a warrant for sixty tons, or to be paid dead freight for as 
much as he shall want ; the master and mariners to be allowed the 
same amount of private trade as the Caesar s men were in pro- 
portion to the tonnage of the ship, and not to be responsible for 
any damage to the goods ; if these conditions are not agreeable 
then he is willing to sell either of the said ships ; hereupon Steevens 
is ordered to examine the Experience and the Harry Bonadventiire 
or any other vessel in the river, and report on them as soon as 
possible, and then Mr. Saynthill's proposals shall be further con- 
sidered. A sapphire ring given by the late Edward Falkoner, 
formerly purser in the Blessing, to Sir Nicholas Crispe, one seal 
ring given by the late John Bincks to his brother Thomas, a 
sheriffs officer, and a ruby ring given by the late John Smith to 
Thomas Browne, a gentleman living at Thorpewater in Northamp- 
tonshire, all three in a ' scrutore ' belonging to Thomas Clarke in 
the custody of the Company, are ordered to be delivered to their 
several owners. {p<\pp^ 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 213 

*A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
November 26, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 88). 

John Mucknell is chosen master of the ship bought from 
Messrs. Fownes and Yard for dispatch to Bantam \the ' Blessing ' 
in the inargiit] at a salary of 61. 13^. ^d. per month, with liberty to 
carry private trade to the value of 50/., provided that none of the 
Company's special commodities or those laden in the vessel be 
taken by him. A list of the goods Mucknell intends to take is 
presented and approved. All endeavours to procure a ship to 
freight having proved futile, certain Committees are desired either 
to provide such a ship to freight for Surat or to buy one suitable 
for that purpose. Thomas Skynner to be paid, according to a 
former agreement, 100/. from the salary due to Thomas Merry, 
Agent in Persia, (i/.) 

A General Court, November 26, 1641 {Court Book,vo\. xvIii, 
p. 89). 

Mr. Deputy intimates that the chief cause why this court has 
been called is to elect a Governor in the place of Sir Christopher 
Clitherowe, deceased ^ ; but before doing so there are one or two 
matters to be settled. The first is concerning the 2,000/. subscribed 
to this Particular Voyage on behalf of Mr. Fremlyn, which was 
vacated by a former general court but has since been considered 
by the Standing and Mixed Committees, who are in favour of 
it, for a great part of this Voyage will be upon the credit of 
Mr. Fremlyn, who has been in India fifteen years and acquired 
some estate, and it is thought wiser to favour him by letting him 
adventure this sum rather than that he should bring home his 
estate in private trade. On being put to the question, this sub- 
scription is agreed to by a general erection of hands. Mr. Deputy 
further intimates that for many years there has been some dispute 
between the Company and Richard Wild, the late President at 
Surat, about a fine imposed on the latter on his return to England, 
whereupon he gave a general release, but has since petitioned m.any 
times for a mitigation of the same ; this being referred to six Com- 
mittees, five of them have given in a report dated the 15th inst. to 

^ Clitherow died on November ii, 1641 (Smyth's Obituary). The last meeting he 
attended was on the 6th of that month. 



214 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

the following effect : that Richard Wild having underwritten 
2,000/. in the Third Joint Stock and only paid in 1,250/., because of 
losses sustained and also on account of some difference depending 
between himself and the Company, the aforesaid Committees are 
of opinion that in respect of these losses and of the great charge 
of the fine imposed, the Company should make good Mr. Wild's 
former subscription of 2,000/., that he may receive all divisions due 
upon it, and that his bond for 230/, should be delivered up to be 
cancelled. Thereupon a Committee (not one of the five) remarks 
that Wild served the Company seven years in India, and received 
100/. the first year ; the second year he was made Accountant and 
continued so three years, but only received 100/. a year, where 
others had been paid 200/. for the same services ; afterwards he 
served as President for three years, and yet was only allowed 100/. 
per annum, while others had been paid at the rate of 500/. per 
annum ; that when he was abroad the stock was not worth above 
60 [sic], but by his industry in dispatching so many ships in one year 
he raised it to 112. The report is then put to the question and 
generally confirmed, and Mr. Wild returns his humble thanks for 
the love shown to him. Mr. Deputy desiring that some able men 
be nominated for election as Governor, Sir Henry Garway, Sir John 
Wolstenholme, Alderman Gayre, Sir Nicholas Crispe, and Alder- 
man Reynardson are named. The choice falls between Sir Henry 
Garway and Alderman Gayre ; and the Court resolving to decide 
by scrutiny it is found that Sir Henry Garway has forty-two hands 
in his favour to Alderman Gayre's twenty-five ; on which Sir John 
Wolstenholme is desired to go with three or four others and 
acquaint Sir Henry with his election and desire him to come and 
take the oath ; but on this being done, he desires leave to think 
over it and give answer next Wednesday.^ {'^hPP-) 

Commission and Instructions from the East India 
Company to Andrew Trumball, Master of the Hopewell, 
[November] 1641 {Marine Records^ Miscellaneotts, vol. iv, No. 19). 

Trumball is furnished with authority from the King to rule and 
govern in the Hopezvell, which has been completely provisioned and 

1 Evidently he consented, for at the next court (December i) he took his seat as 
Governor. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 215 

manned for the voyage. He is directed to make with all expe- 
dition for Masulipatam, but being ' a profest master ' in the art of 
navigation the course is left to his own discretion, except that on 
approaching the equator he is ordered ' to passe the circle betweene 
six and nine degrees to the west of the Lizard meridian ', and not 
to go into Saldania Bay [Table Bay], but to make for the Bay of 
Augustine, where better accommodation for watering, &c., is to be 
had. He is given directions for control of the mariners, and 
concerning the estates of any who shall die during the voyage ; 
concerning stores, provisions, and private trade shipped in his 
vessel ; and concerning the appointment of a commander in case of 
his own death. He is instructed to keep a true account of each 
day's navigation and of all material occurrences, and present these to 
the Company on his return. On the arrival of the Hopeivell at the 
Coast as many men as can be spared are to be allowed to assist in 
manning the ships there ; but on her departure for Bantam they 
are to be recalled to their original posts, together with all provisions 
remaining over from what has been lent. On arriving at Madras- 
patam, or wherever the Agent and Council are residing, Trumball 
and Francis Day are to use all possible diligence in landing at each 
several factory what the Agent there and Mr. Day shall think 
fitting, so that if necessary the ship may proceed to the Bay of 
Bengal to visit and supply the factors there and return with the 
first of the monsoon to the Coast. From thence to go to Persia, 
either with the Company's or freight goods, with all possible 
expedition that Gombroon may be ' timely ' reached and the ship 
return in reasonable time to the Coast. On the return from Persia 
to the Coast, which will be presumably in May, 1643, Trumball is 
to demand of the Agent and factors not only the goods designed 
for England but those also for Bantam and the southern factories, 
and to have all ready by the end of July, that by the first of August 
the ship may proceed to Bantam and there arrive through the 
guidance of God before the end of September, where pepper 
sufficient to fill up will doubtless be found, and so the voyage from 
thence to England may be undertaken by the beginning of 
December at the furthest. No one is to be taken aboard the ship 
or landed at any of the factories without the knowledge and consent 
of the Company. {Signed and sealed. 1 8 //,) 



2i6 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
December i, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 92). 

Francis Smethwicke transfers to Robert Lant the profits of 100/. 
adventure in the Third Joint Stock, of which the principal is taken 
out. Robert, son of Robert Fotherby, is chosen purser of the ship 
designed for Bantam. {\p.) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
December 3, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 92). 

Edward Abbott's adventure of 5,000/. in the Third Joint Stock, 
\blaitk'\ being taken out, is ordered to be transferred to his 
father, Sir Morris Abbott, with all profits, on the latter paying the 
Company the sum of 2,924/, 14s. 6d. owing by his son Edward. 
Sir Morris asks that the interest accruing for non-payment of this 
money may be remitted, but if not he will pay it ; the Court, 
though inclined to grant this request, comes to no decision. 
George, son of George Chaundler, is admitted to the freedom of 
the Company by patrimony. Mr. Ashwell reports the result of his 
consultation with Messrs. Middleton and Massingberd concerning 
the dispute between Gerald Pinson and Thomas Clarke, where- 
upon Pinson is directed to prepare his account by the next court, 
according to the opinion of the referees, and then an absolute 
conclusion shall be made with him. This day week appointed for 
election of a master and other officers for the Crispian, and for 
a steward for the ship for Bantam, {i^pp) 

Richard Browne, English Ambassador in Paris, to 
Secretary Vane, December ^^3, 1641 {Public Record Office: 
Dam. Chas. I, vol. cccclxxxvi, No. 18). 

Yesterday an advocate in the Admiralty of my acquaintance 
brought me word that the owners of a French ship worth 40,000 
crowns taken by the East India Company came to have him of their 
counsel in the suit they intended to commence in this Admiralty 
[Court], which he refused, in regard he was always retained for the 
English nation. He could not acquaint me with all the particu- 
lars, but, by what I heard from him, I fear it will prove an untoward 
business. (|/.) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 217 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
December 8, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 94). 

The ship bought from Messrs. Fownes and Yard, being ready to 
be launched, is named the Blessing. A gentleman appearing on 
behalf of the administrator of the late William Gibson desires an 
account of all that belongs to the said Gibson's estate ; he is told 
that he may, with any friend who is an accountant, see Gibson's 
account, and if he cannot settle this matter satisfactorily with 
Mr. Sambrooke the Court will endeavour to do so. (i/-) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
December 10, 1641 [Co2irt Book, vol. xviii, p. 95). 

James Cox to be paid 500/. upon account of his first and second 
divisions in the Third Joint Stock. Thomas Steevens entertained 
as master in the Crispian at a salary of 8/. per month, with liberty 
to spend 100/. in private trade, on condition that before departing 
he delivers in a note of what goods he is taking and another note 
to the same effect on his return, and agrees not to trade in any of 
the Company's goods, or in any that the Crispian is laden with. 
Thomas Thomblins chosen purser for the Crw/m;/, with Luke Pynn 
as his mate, and Thomas Fitch as steward. John, son of the late 
John Cappur, is entertained as a writer at a salary of 35^. per 
month, to go to Bantam in the Blessing under the merchant 
employed in that ship, and to return in her ; and John Mantell, 
formerly purser's mate in the Crispian, is entertained in a like 
capacity for Surat at the same salary. The owners and master of 
the Aleppo MercJiant, hired upon freight for Surat, to be allowed to 
bring her into the Company's dock at Blackwall, to make use 
of the slaughter-house, furnace, and all other accommodations, 
provided that an account be kept by Mr. Fotherby of all damage 
done, that satisfaction for the same may be had from the said 
owners, (i-l//.) 

Sir William Boswell at the Hague to Sir Thomas Roe, 
December ^|, 1641 {Public Record Office: Dom. Chas. /, vol. 
cccclxxxvi, No. ^'^. 

Monsieur Somerdyck is in great extremity and like to leave the 
world, which crosses my East India business still more and more. 



2i8 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Ambassador Joachimi is still here, and I believe will be till 
H. HenvHet's advice comes ; whose industry and circumspection 
never sleepeth. 

' A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
December 15, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 96). 

Henry Kedington, formerly employed as steward to Greenland, 
is chosen steward for the Blessmg, and William Cary, who has 
served the Company eighteen years, is entertained as steward's 
mate in the Crispian. Joseph Cocke transfers to Richard Davies, 
merchant, the profits of his adventure of 1,000/. in the Third Joint 
Stock, (i/.) 

' A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees/ 
December 17, 1641 [Cotirt Book, vol. xviii, p. 97). 

Sir John Wolstenholme and Messrs. Ashwell and Methwold are 
desired to deliver to Sir Edward Nicholas the petition to be exhi- 
bited to the King concerning the restitution of imposts and other 
favours now read, and entreat him to present it to His Majesty. 
Mr. Holloway is appointed a Committee for Blackwall Yard in the 
place of Mr. Mun, deceased.^ Mr. Pinson presenting several 
written exceptions to the account given him by Sambrooke, these 
are referred to the Committees before appointed to examine his 
affairs ; they withdraw, but return shortly and report that they 
have adjusted the account to Pinson's satisfaction, upon which the 
Court orders that he be paid all that is due to him. Mr. Pinson 
then represents his various services to the Company, for which he 
desires some consideration ; he is granted 200/. and is entertained 
to go to Bantam in the Blessing at a salary of 250/. per annum (on 
condition of abstaining from all private trade), and is granted per- 
mission to adventure what he can spare of his salary in this present 
Voyage. Hawkins, the boatmaker, not to be paid for the long- 
boat and skiff he made for the Hopezvell until further order. Ten 
pounds ordered to be distributed amongst the poor widows in the 
hamlets of Blackwall, Limehouse, and Ratcliffe, and another 10/. 
amongst the poor widows of East India men, as is customary at 
' this blessed time of Christmas '. (i| pp) 

* The date of Mun's death is not known, but he was buried on July 21, 1641. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 219 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
December 20, 1641 [Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 99). 

Two or more Committees are desired to examine and report on 
the difference between Thomas Clarke and Richard Hudson. 
Elizabeth, widow of Vincent Ascough, a servant to the Company, 
is given 10s. from the poor-box. The Court, noting the death of 
the Secretary, Edward Sherburne,^ nominates William Burgis, 
Henry Robinson, and Richard Swinglehurst to supply his place ; 
Swinglehurst is chosen at a salary of 100/. per annum for the secre- 
taryship, and to be allowed 40/. for keeping the warehouse under 
the Exchange, and 20/. towards the maintenance of a servant, these 
payments to begin at Christmas, (i /.) 

' A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
December 24, 1641 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 100). 

Cutler, the garbler, to be paid his bill of 69/. \s. ^d. Rebecca 
Watkins given 2o.y. from the poor-box. At the request of Roger 
Vivian, one of the owners of the Aleppo Merdiant, the Court gives 
permission for the master of the said ship to be supplied with such 
timber from Blackwall as he shall want for her speedy fitting ; 
Mr. Vivian promises either to pay for it or return an equal amount 
of the same quality. Mary, widow of George Muschampe, petitions 
for certain sums of money due unto her late husband ; the Court 
orders that she be paid what salary is due unto him, and advises her 
to apply to the general court for further satisfaction. {^\PP-) 

•A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,* 
December 29, 1641 (Court Book, vol. xviii, p. loi). 

Davies, the pilot, to be paid 4/. for taking the Hopewell {torn 
Blackwall to Gravesend. Mr. Deputy reports that he went last 
Monday with Sir John Wolstcnholme and Mr. Willson to Sir 
Edward Nicholas to hear what answer the King had given to the 
Company's petition concerning the restitution of impost on goods 

1 Richard Smyth in his contemporary Obituary (Brit. Mus. Sloane MS. 886, printed as 
vol. 44 of the Camden Society's publications) notes under date of December 21, 1641 : 
' Mr. Edward Sherborn, secretary to the East India Company and cleric of the ordinance 
at the Tower, a courteous gentleman, died.' The text makes it evident that this date is 
incorrect ; but it must be remembered that the Brit. Mus. MS. is only a transcript. 



220 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

shipped out between the 25th of last May and the 1st of December. 
Sir Edward told them that the King had referred the petition to 
the consideration of the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury. 
They then informed Sir Edward that, when Sir Henry Vane was 
Secretary, there had been many conferences about the injuries and 
wrongs done to this Company by the Dutch East India Company, 
which amounted to 6co,ooo/. or 700,000/. ; yet on the promise of 
500,000 guilders from the Dutch and of a good ' reglement ' for the 
future, this Company was content to accept the lesser sum, but as 
yet the Dutch have not fulfilled their promise. They entreated 
Sir Edward to call for the papers and letter Sir Henry Vane 
received from Sir William Boswell about this business, and to 
write to the latter concerning it. Sir Edward desired to be 
informed how far the matter had gone, that he might see where 
the stop was and give the Company the best assistance in his 
power. At the request of Henry Oulton, formerly a factor at 
Bantam, the Court orders that for all money of his brought into 
the Company's cash at Bantam he is to be allowed at the rate of 
5.f. the rial, on notice being received from the President and Council 
there of the receipt of the money, (i/-) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
January 5, 1642 [Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 102). 

A contract is made with John Wheldon to supply 400 pigs of 
Derbyshire lead. Richard Swinglchurst to be given 64/, to distribute 
at court in New Year's gifts according to an agreement made this 
day. {\p.) 

A Court of Committees, January 7, 1642 (Court Bool', vol. 
xviii, p. 103). 

John Sleeman is entertained as surgeon in the Blessing, but 
Nicholas Welch, who had been chosen as surgeon's mate in that 
ship, is discharged, Mr. Woodall reporting him to be ' a meere 
barbor'. The request of Captain Johnson, commander of the 
Unicorn, for permission to mend his ship in one of the Company's 
docks is refused, and it is ordered that henceforth only vessels 
belonging to the Company shall be repaired at the Blackwall docks. 
A letter is read from John Hunter, stating what he knows concerning 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 221 

'Keelings Islands';^ whereupon the Court orders that directions be 
given in the general letters to Bantam that a small pinnace be sent 
to discover these islands upon the arrival of the Blessing. Alexander 
Rose transfers by deed to Thomas Chauncy 266/. 13^. 4^. in the 
Third Joint Stock with all profits, (i p.) 

Sir Francis Windebank in Paris to his son Thomas, 
January {^, 1642 {Public Record Office: Doni. Chas. /, vol. 
cccclxxxviii, No. 34). 

According to your desire I send you a letter to Sir Henry Vane. 
The business of the East India merchants Mr. Burlamachi under- 
stands best of any, and can best direct you. (i^//-) 

' A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
January 12, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 104). 

Mr. Blyth, formerly povvdermaker to the Company, offers to buy 
its saltpetre at 3/. ^s. per hundred, to sell the Company powder at 
4/. per hundred, to build three mills at his own charge for making 
the powder, and desires to have the Company's horse-mill at Black- 
wall ; this is referred to Captain Styles and other Committees. 
Thomas Stevens, master of the Crispian, is allowed a supply of 
canvas, to make a new set of sails at sea. {^p.) 

' A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
January 14, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p, 105). 

Mr. Cordell to be paid o^d. per lb. for powder mended and returned 
to Blackwall. Twenty or thirty barrels of the Company's saltpetre 
to be delivered to Mr. Methwold, who is to pay for it at the current 
rate. Hugh Lockctt, servant of the late Edward Sherburne, is given 
25/. for services rendered since November, 1637. Gerald Pinson 
desires permission to adventure 500/. in the Particular Voyage, 40c/. 
of this to be placed in the Company's hands before setting out, and 
the other ico/. to be paid from his wages ; also that the money he 
shall pay into the Company's cash at Bantam may be added to his 

^ These islands, now known as the Cocos, lie about 600 miles SW. by W. of Java 
Head. It is generally accepted that they were discovered in 1609 by Captain William 
Keeling, on his homeward voyage from Bantam ; but I can find no actual account 
of tliis. The group was annexed by England in 1857, '"^"'^ '^ "°^ under the administra- 
tion of the Straits Government. 



222 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

adventure at the rate of ^s. the rial ; the Court resolves that, if he 
lives for six months, loo/. from his wages shall make up his adven- 
ture to 500/., that the money he shall pay within a year from this 
day into the cash at Bantam shall be added at the rate he desires, 
and that the freedom of the Company shall be bestowed upon him. 
Messrs. Wilson and Bateman are directed to treat with the Earl of 
Northampton about hiring Crosby Hall. At the request of David 
Otgar and William de Vischer, part-owners of the Blessings the 
Court orders the money still unpaid for that ship to be kept in the 
Company's hands until further order, (li//.) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
January 19, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 106). 

The Court approves the settlement made with Pinson by the 
Committees to whom the dispute was referred, and allows him 
interest on a sum of money paid in at Bantam by him. Mr. Muck- 
nell, master of the Blessing, to be provided with half a hogshead of 
canary for the great cabin, as is customary for ships of a like burden. 
John Young is directed to dispeed the Blessing to Gravesend and 
the Downs as soon as wind and weather will permit. Mr. Cordell 
contracts for 1,000/. worth of saltpetre at 3/. lOi". per hundred, at two 
six months upon rebate. {^\Pp) 

An Account of the Disposal of the Pepper bought 
Bv Lord Cottington of the East India Company, January 
20, 1642 {Public Record Office : East Indies, vol. iv B, No. 81 I). 

Giving the price fetched and the names of the purchasers ; the 
total amount sold being 2,310 bags, containing 607,522 lb., which 
at 20^. per lb. amounted to ,50,626/. \6s. ()d. For the purchase 
money four bonds of 14,000/. each were given, to be paid on the 29th 
of March and 29th of September, 1641, the 29th of March and 29th 
of September, 1642, and one bond of 10,000/. for payment of the 
remaining 7,283/. on the 29th of December, 1641. (2^//.) 

* A Court of Committees and of the Mixt Committees,' 
January 21, 1642 {Court Book,wo\. xviii, p. 108). 

Mr. Millett, master of the Aleppo Merchant, to be paid 40c/. in 
part of the 500/. he is to receive for freighting his ship to Surat. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 223 

The differences between Mr. Sambrooke and Mrs. Tynes are with 
their consent referred to Messrs. Methwold, Haggett, and Barker. 
A report is read from certain Committees concerning the differences 
in account between Richard Hudson and Thomas CIarke,who for mis- 
behaviour and embezzlement of large sums of the Company's money 
were sent back to England about seventeen months ago, and im- 
prisoned. It is found that Hudson, when Clarke was ill and deprived 
of all reason and memory, so that although Agent he was incapable 
of the least employment, caused him to be put in irons for many 
days and seized upon the warehouses and all the contents, without 
making any inventory or taking any one to assist him ; that he broke 
open all the trunks and ' screetores ' in Clarke's room and seized 
all books of accounts and all papers belonging both to Clarke and 
to the Company, also 1,800 rials of eight in cash (part of a larger 
sum received from Captain Weddall) without taking an inventory or 
any one as witness, though admonished to do so by Francis Day. 
The Committees therefore consider that Hudson should make satis- 
faction for the 1,800 rials ; that he is liable for the 1,047 pagodas, 
or 3,094 rials of eight, which he affirms he gave as a present to the 
Governor of Masulipatam in order to obtain release from prison, 
where he had been unjustly confined for twenty-five days, as he cannot 
tell of any offence committed by the Company's servants which 
might have been the cause of this imprisonment or have necessitated 
any reward for his release, but on the other hand Clark and the 
Agent and Council at Masulipatam testify that Hudson by his unjust 
trading in those parts might well have deserved such imprisonment ; 
and that when his account is made up by Sambrooke Hudson will 
be found much indebted to the Company. Clarke is also much 
indebted to the Company, but as he appears to have so little the 
Committees did not examine into anything more concerning him. 
The Court confirms this report, and directs the said sums to be 
charged to Hudson's account ; and as he is quite unable to pay them 
is inclined to prosecute him as an example to other delinquents, but 
nothing is resolved on. At the request of Richard Wild, Mr. Acton 
is directed to put in suit the bond entered into by Sir Bryan Janson, 
Messrs. Clobury and Page for calicoes, to enforce payment of the 
principal (160/.) and interest due on the said bond, the charge of the 
suit to be borne by Wild. Certain Committees are desired to pro- 



224 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

vide broadcloths to be sent in the Crispian for Surat ; also fifty- 
chests of silver and some more lead. {ZPP-) 

Lord Cottington at Fonthill to the King, January 
24, 1642 [Public Record Office : Dom. Chas.I,vo\. cccclxxxviii, No. 
86). 

I beseech you cast an eye on this enclosed letter, which I have 
received from those that were the Farmers of the Customs, wherein 
they call upon me for their indemnity concerning the money for the 
pepper which was bought of the East India Company, You will 
remember the great service that was therein done, and how season- 
ably ; and therefore I am very confident you will command that 
great care be had that the mischief with such eminent ruin fall not 
upon me ; and that your Commissioners of the Treasury so take it 
to heart as the East India Company be either satisfied or at least 
persuaded not to press the payment with speed and rigour, until 
they can find means to give them satisfaction. I should advise that 
you command some of your Commissioners, especially Sir John 
Bankes, the Lord Chief Justice, and Secretary Nicholas, in the first 
place to call to them those that have written this enclosed letter and 
fairly to consider with them what course may be taken with the 
East India Company, either for time or payment, and then to deal 
with the Governor and Company accordingly ; and by this means 
I do not doubt but some way may be found for a happy issue. 
I beseech you that this business be taken much to heart, as that 
which may else crush me, more than any enemy I have could wish; 
and I am sure it would much trouble you to see me ruined by the 
doing of so great and opportune a service, (I3-//.) 

Enclosure to Foregoing : — The Late Farmers of the 
Customs to Lord Cottington, January 20, 1642 {Public 
Record Office : East Indies, vol. iv B, No, 81). 

Reminding His Lordship that they are bound with him and others 
to the East India Company for 63,000/., whereof by the favour of 
the Lords Commissioners 13,000/. has been paid, having been 
deducted by the Company from the subsidy and impost on its goods. 
Informing him that they have this day received the enclosed note 
from the Company, by which it appears that there is 22,583/. 4^-. ^d. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 225 

more now due, and that in March next there will be another bond 
of 14,000/. due ; for all which satisfaction is urgently desired, the 
Company expressing its determination to sue the bonds and arrest 
the writers unless some speedy course is taken for payment of the 
said money. That as His Lordship is principally bound, the Com- 
pany alleging that he made a particular engagement in court when 
buying the comodities to sell all his lands rather than not pay the 
money, and that their security was brought in by his means, they 
having no indemnity for this great sum, only several tallies levied 
upon farms, which are now void by Acts of Parliament and so of no 
value, they conceive it their duty to acquaint him with the fore- 
going, that he may advise some way, suitable to the honour and 
justice which he has always professed, to secure himself and them. 
Pray for a speedy answer with which to acquaint the Company, it 
having stopped further proceedings until the return of the messenger 
with this letter. {^Signcdby Paul Pindar, John Jacob, Job Harbie, 
Nicholas Crispc, John N idles, and John Harrison. Endorsed: 
'' Pepper buisines\ Copy. 1% pp-) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
January 2(5, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. iii). 

Ordered that, in the event of a ship being freighted for Bantam, 
the surplus provisions provided for the Crispian shall be bought 
for her supply. John Langley, merchant, executor to his father, 
John Langley, transfers to Geoffrey Rowland the profits of 
589/. 3J-. i\,d. adventure in the Third Joint Stock, the principal 
being taken out. Lady Jane Fenn, widow and executrix of Sir 
Richard Fenn, transfers to William Clarke, merchant, 888/. 6j-. 8^, 
(a third part of her late husband's adventure in the Third Joint 
Stock) with all profits. The petition of Anthony, youngest son 
of Sir Christopher Clithcrow, to go as an under-factor to Surat is 
referred for consideration until the departure of the next ships, this 
being a Particular Voyage when no one is to be allowed to remain 
in the country. Mr. Acton is directed to take counsel's advice how 
to obtain satisfaction for the money owing by Edward Abbott 
to the Company ; also to prosecute William Clobury upon his bill 
for calicoes sold to him, Sir Bryan Janson,and Messrs. Wild and Page. 
Mrs. Wills, administratrix of Captain Matthew Wills, acquaints 



226 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

the Court that Charles Hart, nephew of the late Captain, has made 
stay of I, coo/, due to his uncle's estate, claiming part as next of kin, 
but that she desires it all to be paid to her as administratrix. As 
she is the only person who can give a discharge to the Company, 
the Court is willing to order payment of the money, but because 
of the said stay directs that it be detained until Hart can be com- 
municated with, (i^//.) 

'A Court of Committees witpi the Mixt Committees,' 
January 28, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 112). 

Certain Committees are desired to use their best endeavours for 
the timely dispatch of the ships to Surat. Mrs. Wills to be paid 
1,035/. due to the late Captain Wills, notwithstanding the stay 
made by Charles Hart. Adrian Beeton, administratrix of John 
Blackston, a cook who died at Bantam, to be paid 40/. from 
Blackston's wages to provide necessaries for his daughter Sarah, 
and to repair some houses belonging to her. A pipe of canary to 
be sent to the President and factors at Surat. Mr. Saynthill offers 
either to let the Caesar to the Company on freight for Bantam 
or to sell her ; whereupon he is desired to consider his offer and 
bring a list of the said ship's stores and provisions to the court next 
Friday. Mr. Bowen is directed to prepare a list of all factors in the 
Indies by the next court, when it shall be resolved whom to recall. 
With regard to the trade in general, it is moved that this be referred 
to four Committees to be privately debated and then reported on, 
or that a general court be called to ascertain the opinions of the 
generality in this matter ; but, as nothing is resolved, Mr. Deputy 
desires each Committee to consider this subject before the next 
meeting. Two iron ' cutts ' ^ to be provided for the Crispian. 
Susan, widow and administratrix of James Jones, who died in the 
Jewels to be paid 50/. upon account of her late husband's wages. 
Henry Wheately, formerly purser in the Great James and now 
imprisoned in the Compter, petitions for remission of a fine of 170/. 
imposed by the Company on two tons of goods, or for as much as 
will release him from prison ; the Court is inclined to favour him, 
on hearing that he is an able mariner, and carried himself like 
a ' stout ' man in the taking of Ormus Castle and in the fight in the 

* Short cannons, of various bores. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 227 

Persian Gulf against the eight Portugal ships forced into Larack, 
also that he is considered a fit man, on account of his judgement 
and experience, to be prime mate in the Aleppo Merchant ; there- 
fore the Secretary is desired to inquire and report why Wheately 
is imprisoned. A letter from Richard Boothby to the Governor 
and Deputy, dated the 26th instant and enclosing a petition for re- 
entertainment into the Company's service or for permission to go 
to India on payment of his own passage, is read, but, both being 
' fraught with ill language and full of malice ', they are not thought 
worthy of an answer, and the Court directs that they be put with 
other papers of Boothby's. {p-\ pp-) 

Laurence Squibb to Secretary Nicholas, February 3, 
1642 {Public Record Office-. Dom. Ckas. /, vol. cccclxxxix, No. 6). 

I beseech you to move His Majesty in this business of the pepper, 
which so deeply concerns Lord Cottington that, for aught I yet see, 
may prove to be most dangerous if not eminent ruin to His Lord- 
ship and his estate. I have been given to understand that the East 
India Company intend not only to prosecute their bonds with 
all the rigour and extremity that the law will allow, but will also 
petition the Parliament against My Lord for his manner of proceed- 
ing in obtaining the pepper, and how prejudicial this has been 
to the whole Company and to the very trade itself; wherein, to my 
knowledge, having been in most part of the proceedings an eye- 
witness, His Lordship took a most just and honourable course. 
Yet when this shall be preferred by a multitude, the matter 
aggravated or wrested, and, perhaps, not wanting back friends 
enough that shall affirm for His Lordship's disadvantage, I con- 
ceive My Lord must not expect any favour in this business coming 
there. And I have heard from one of the Farmers, that they, and 
also Mr. Maxwell, do intend to join with the India Company in 
petitioning against My Lord, and will allege that it was his work 
to draw them into it. All I can here learn that is to be done for 
relief herein is only that His Majesty will be pleased to send 
for the Governor and some principal [men] of the India Company, 
and to let them know his good intentions for the satisfying of the 
debt, with the interest, either by way of defalcation of their own 
customs, when the bill of tunnagc shall be settled, or by some 

Q 2 



228 COURT MINUTES, ETC, OF THE 

other more speedy way, out of some other parts of his revenue 
as soon as it shall be established. FS. — Whatever you may please 
to do herein, I conceive Mr. Comptroller^ will assist you in it, 
being engaged for the debt with my Lord [Cottington] and the 
Farmers of the [Customs]. {Draft, i^pp-) 

*A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
February 4, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 115). 

Kentledge allotted to the Aleppo Merchant and Crispian. 
Mr. Massingberd moves that the adventurers in this Particular 
Voyage be allowed to bring in their third and fourth payments 
upon discount, as he has not above 600/. in cash and is very 
unwilling to borrow money at interest for this purpose ; his request 
is agreed to, and a general court is ordered to be held next 
Wednesday morning to acquaint all the adventurers with this 
motion. The freighting of a ship for Bantam to be deferred until 
the arrival of the ships from thence, as they are expected about 
next May. Francis Smithwicke transfers to John Holloway the 
profits of 100/. adventure in the Third Joint Stock, the principal 
having been taken out. The Court, taking into consideration the 
lessening of charges at all factories to the southwards, orders 
a letter to be written to the President and Council at Bantam and 
sent by express to the Downs to the Blessing (still detained there 
by contrary winds), with directions to take a strict account of all 
factors, assistants, and dependants within the limits of Bantam and 
its dependencies, their number and employments, and dispatch 
to England by the first ship all who can be spared, so that the 
Third Joint Stock may be relieved of their charge, and only so 
many factors kept as shall be necessary to provide lading for the 
last ship for this Particular Voyage. What resolution to take with 
regard to the remains of the Third Joint Stock, though briefly 
considered, is not decided. Henry Wheately again petitioning for 
remission of freight on his private trade, he is lent 50/. and per- 
mission is given for his entertainment as prime mate to Mr. Millett 
in the Aleppo Merchant. Twenty barrels of powder to be bought 
iox ^^z Crispian. {i^ pp.) 

^ Sir Peter Wyche. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 229 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees/ 
February 7, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 116). 

The Governor proposes that a ship of 3,000 or 4,000 \sic\ tons be 
sent to fetch the stock from the southwards, there being about 
13,000/, quick stock, sufficient to lade her back with pepper ; and that 
10,000 or 12,000 rials of eight be sent to pay customs and other 
charges. But it is thought that nothing should be done without 
consent of the adventurers in the Third Particular Voyage \sic. 
? Third Joint Stock], and no ship sent until Michaelmas without 
consent of the adventurers in this Particular Voyage, for until then 
the dispatch of stock and ships is properly theirs. It is suggested 
that if a ship like the Caesar were dispeeded and the Third Joint 
Stock consented to take 400 tons by way of freight, the adventurers 
in this Particular Voyage would supply the rest ; this matter 
is referred for further consideration. Mr. Holloway to be given 
his warrants for the division of silk, calicoes, and cloves. {\ p.) 

A General Court of the Adventurers in the Particu- 
lar Voyage, February 9, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 117). 

Mr. Governor intimates that this court is called to be informed of 
the Treasurer's lack of money for setting out this Particular Voyage. 
There are fifty chests of money to be provided for the Surat ships, 
and he has only sixteen, and but 600/. in cash for payment of other 
provisions ; this money must either be supplied by the adventurers 
or taken up at interest, and the Treasurer is loth to adopt the latter 
course. The Court of Committees is of opinion that all who shall 
bring in their third and fourth payments upon discount should be 
allowed eight per cent, on the same for ten days after the quarter- 
day of payment ; and this being put to the question is agreed to by 
a general erection of hands. Mr. Governor further reports that 
there is 63,00c/. quick stock to the southwards, which is sufficient 
to lade home the Mary, the William, the Rcforviation, and the 
Szvan from Bantam, leaving a surplus of 13,000/. (which will lade 
a ship of about 400 tons), besides the six per cent, of what is gone 
in the Hopeivell and Blessing, and if there were only ii,ooc/. in 
stock it would serve ; therefore he desires to know if the court will 
grant permission to the adventurers in the Third Joint Stock to 



230 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

dispatch such a ship to fetch their remaining stock, sending in her 
2,000/. to pay customs and other charges. Much dispute ensues, 
some thinking that if such a ship or stock is dispeeded it may 
prejudice this Particular Voyage ; or that only 500/. should be 
sent to pay customs, &c. ; while another affirms that, as there 
are no customs there, no stock need be sent. Reply is made that 
as next Michaelmas the adventurers in the Third Joint Stock may 
send out what they please, it is but a small thing for them to ask 
to dispeed a ship four months before that time, for if she does not 
go in May it will be of no use ; that if the new adventurers will 
supply the Third Joint Stock with money in India none need 
be sent out, but some must be had, as there are customs to be paid 
at Jambi and other places to the south whence the pepper is to be 
fetched ; that there need be no fear of prejudice, for by God's 
blessing this ship may return in 1643 with pepper, when this 
Particular Voyage will have none. It is then moved that if the 
adventurers in this Particular Voyage wish it, a similar liberty 
shall be granted to them by the Third Joint Stock ; and the 
Governor putting it to the question, it is agreed to allow the Third 
Joint Stock to send out a ship of 400 tons with 2,000/. stock, on 
condition that a like favour is permitted the adventurers in this 
Particular Voyage if they desire it. As some adventurers are 
behindhand with their second payment, it is moved that some way 
be considered to enforce payment, as in the event of losses occurring 
they may refuse to make good their deficit, and so be in a better 
case than others who have paid up ; it is therefore proposed to 
impose a broke of 12/. or 18/. on them. As, however, only 2,000/, 
out of 25,000/. is unpaid, it is thought that others will advance 
their payments to make up this sum, and Mr. Massingberd asserting 
that the gentlemen who have not paid will doubtless do so, after 
some dispute it is agreed that, if the defaulters do not send in their 
third payment sooner, they shall be required to pay interest at the 
rate of eight per cent. The court generally agrees to a policy 
of assurance being taken out for all the coral (valued at 5,000/.) 
coming to England from Leghorn in the Mary Rose, and to 
another for the one-fifth part of the subscription in this Particular 
Voyage (valued at 20,000/.) now in the Blessing, to assure that ship 
to Bantam ; and that the adventurers in this Particular Voyage 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 231 

shall be the first to underwrite in these two policies, any one of 
them to be allowed to underwrite one-fifth part of his subscription. 
John Massingberd, merchant, transfers to Robert Bateman, Esq.,the 
profits of 16,907/. adventure in the Third Joint Stock, the principal 
being taken out. Oliver Laurence, administrator of the late Thomas 
Smithwicke, transfers to John Holloway the profits of 1,000/. 
adventure in the Third Joint Stock. Ann, wife of Thomas Lening, 
a factor now in the Jonas^ to be given 10/. on account of her 
husband's wages. (2^ pp^ 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
February 16, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 120). 

The Company's sakers to be sold at 12s. per hundred, and the 
brass shivers to be offered to Mr. Garway. The mariners enter- 
tained in the Crispian to be paid their imprest money. Steevens's 
bill of 72/. 12^. id. for boathire, &c., to be paid. Resolved 
not to buy any tin for dispatch this year, as no encouragement has 
been given for it in the advices received. Messrs. Burnell and 
Middletonto provide forty more cloths, as they can be obtained at 
a cheap rate. Mr. Methwold desires to know the decision of the 
Court concerning the factors, as the ships for Surat are shortly 
to be dispeeded and Messrs. Borneford, Robinson, and Wild will 
probably be in England this summer, and Mr. Fremlyn the follow- 
ing year, so that very few will be left to manage the Company's 
business ; he advises that some one be appointed in India or sent 
from England to take charge of the stock belonging to this Voyage. 
This matter is referred for a week, by which time it is thought that 
one who has been in India and is capable for this work will offer his 
services. Mr. Dycer desires to buy some of the Company's indigo ; 
but no agreement is come to, as his offer to take the whole parcel at 
75-. per lb. at seven six months is considered too mean, and he will 
not accept the Company's price of "js. per lb. at four six months. 
Some letters received last Monday from Persia are read, and 
Mr. Bowen is directed to answer one from the factors there, and 
to send a copy by way of Leghorn or Venice and another by 
Marseilles ; also to write to Mr. Barnard, Consul at Aleppo, and 
advise him that he has been awarded 20/. as a gratification for his 
care in delivering the Company's letters. {i\pp-) 



233 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

' A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
February i8, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 119). 

Mr. Cord well contracts for all the Company's saltpetre at 3/. \os. 
the hundred, one-third to be paid in ready money, the remainder 
upon discount at three six months. Upon a petition from the 
friends of John Brightwell, late master of the pinnace Hope, taken 
in the Persian Gulf by the Malabars, and from Margaret, wife 
of Thomas ^ Mosse, who was captured in the same ship and is 
detained with Brightwell and others in Burgaree and adjoining 
places and very badly treated, Mr. Bowen is directed to advise the 
President and Council at Surat in the general letters by the 
Crispian to take some speedy coarse for ransoming all the Com- 
pany's servants so detained. John Woodall to be paid 150/. upon 
his account. The Court, taking into consideration that the ships 
are about to be dispatched to Surat and that nothing has been 
decided concerning the trade in general or the recall of the factors, 
causes the petitions formerly shown to the King and Parliament to 
be read, and then orders a petition to be drawn up and sent to the 
House of Commons to entreat that the Company's grievances may 
be referred to a committee and something done before the departure 
of the ships, (i p) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
February 22, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 122). 

The Crispian and Aleppo Merchant ordered to sail for Gravesend 
and thence to the Downs as speedily as possible ; and as it is 
thought that the coral may not arrive as soon as expected, 
Mr, Bowen is directed to give several commissions to Messrs. 
Steevens and Millett that if the Mary Rose arrives before the said 
ships depart, or if they meet her in the Channel or elsewhere, the 
coral is to be removed from her into the said vessels. The petition 
drawn up for presentation to the House of Commons is read, 
approved, and ordered to be engrossed, and Sir Henry Vane to 
be desired to get it read in the House, (i/-) 

^ This should be ' John' (cf. p. 273). The Surat letter of January 27, 1642 {0,C. 1787) 
mentions John Mosse and Richard Husbands as having been captured by the Malabars 
while making a voyage in a vessel belonging to a Portuguese named Duarte Femandes Corea. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 233 

' A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
February 25, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 132), 

Mr. Boulton desiring to know at what price the Company will 
sell the indigo, is told the same price and time as Mr. Dycer was 
at a former court ; he requests time to consider, promising to 
acquaint the Governor and Deputy with his decision to-morrow on 
the Exchange. Edward Knipe, who formerly served the Company 
as a factor and has since been employed in a like capacity by 
Mr. Courteen, is entertained to go as a factor in the Crispiana 
[i. e. the Crispiat{\ to Surat for this Particular Voyage, and to 
return in her or in the Aleppo MercJiaut, whichever shall leave 
India last, at a salary of 200/. per annum, on condition of for- 
bearing all private trade (on pain of forfeiting such salary), and 
giving bond in the same manner as Pinson and Day have done. On 
reading a certificate from the Master, Wardens, and Assistants 
of the Trinity House, the Court orders that John Sydery, master 
of the Dolphin, be paid freight, according to an agreement made 
with him by charter-party, for 30,000 pipestaves brought from 
Ireland, on delivery of the same into the Company's yard at 
Blackwall. The dispute between the Company and Richard 
Hudson and between the latter and Thomas Clarke is again 
examined ; but, the day being far spent, no resolution is come 
to. {ip.) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
March 2, 1642 {Cotirt Book, vol. xviii, p. 123). 

The Company's indigo sold to Stephen Boulton and John Brett 
for ']s. per lb. at four six months. Davies to be paid 4/. for 
piloting the Crispian. The reference from Parliament on the Com- 
pany's petition is read, and in it the said petition is referred ^ to 
the committee for Suffolk cloth and the cloth of the kingdom, of 
which Sir Henry Vane is chairman. That this business may be 
better prepared for the said committee, the Governor, the Deputy, 
Sir John Wolstenholme, Sir Nicholas Crispe, Sir John Gayre, and 
others are desired to form a committee and meet on Friday morning 
at 7 o'clock. It is agreed to summon a general court of the 
* On March i : see the Journals of the House. 



234 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

adventurers in the Third Joint Stock to obtain consent for a ship to 
be freighted to Bantam to fetch what is remaining there, and 
to tell them of the great quantities of calicoes and silks ready 
for delivery upon their divisions, and desire them to take these 
away, as the Company will not be responsible for them. The 
Aleppo Merchant is ordered to sail for Gravesend at the first 
opportunity ; direction as to her keeping company with the 
Crispiana is to be given hereafter. James Mann, who has under- 
written for 500/. in this Particular Voyage, is admitted to the 
freedom of the Company on paying 5/. John Massingbird trans- 
fers to James Mann 500/. adventure in this Particular Voyage with 
all profits, and to Benjamin De La Noy 400/. adventure in the same 
with all profits. (li//.) 

A Meeting of the Special Committee to consider the 
Petition presented to Parliament, March 4, 164a {Court 
Book, vol. xviii, p. 125). 

The Company's petition, &c., having been read, the remonstrance 
formerly presented to the House of Commons and since withdrawn 
is commanded to be read also, when it appears that in the latter the 
Company stated that its trade was decaying because of the injuries 
received from the Dutch, the trading of Sir William Courteene 
during his lifetime and afterwards of his son and of Mr. Endymion 
Porter, and the great impost placed upon its exported and imported 
goods ; the remedies to keep the trade from utter ruin were also 
stated. Thereupon the assembled committee causes the general 
complaints against the Dutch to be read, and finding these ' too 
tedious for the Committee of the House of Parlyament ', orders an 
abstract of them to be drawn up and the proofs of each particular 
to be looked up and set forth. It is then moved that the Amboyna 
book be reprinted. Much dispute ensues ; and finally it is agreed 
to ask the opinion of the Court of Committees and of the General 
Court to be held next Wednesday, and if both approve, to have 
the said book reprinted, with such additions concerning Pollaroone 
and other wrongs received from the Dutch as shall be thought 
fitting. {\\pp.) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 235 

A Court of Committees, March 4, 1643 {Court Book, vol. 
xviii, p. 136), 

The Governor announces the motion made at the meeting of the 
Committees this morning for the reprinting of the Amboyna book, 
and desires to know the opinion of this court, in order to be able to 
inform the general court to be held next Wednesday ; whereupon 
it is unanimously agreed to have the said book reprinted. Abraham 
Chamberleyne moves, on behalf of the parish of St. Andrew Under- 
shaft, for some contribution towards relief of the poor distressed 
Irish who have fled there ; he is told that the matter shall be con- 
sidered. Forty cloths and twenty-five chests of silver ordered to be 
shipped aboard the Aleppo Merchant, and sixty cloths and the rest of 
the treasure aboard the Crispiana. Thomas Russell requests some 
allowance on defective silk, part of one of the lots bought by William 
Middleton, but no decision is come to. Mrs. Mary Muschampe 
petitions the Court to consider that her husband supplied the place 
of President in his second employment after the expiration of his 
covenanted time for 150/. per annum ; the great losses he sustained 
by the seizure of his estate on returning from that employment ; and 
the long and expensive suit he was forced into on the Company 
detaining 200/. from him by way of fine ; and to afford her and her 
five small children some relief, they being reduced to a miserable and 
comfortless state. She is told that general releases were exchanged 
between the Company and her husband, but since then he was 
employed by it again, and after his death she received all that 
appeared due to her ; therefore this court can do no more ; yet, if 
she likes to petition the general court, her case shall be recom- 
mended. On her departure the case is taken into consideration ; 
and though nothing is due to her yet it is conceived that it would 
be an act of charity for the general court to bestow upon her 200/., 
if on receipt of her husband's accounts everything appears straight. 
Mr. Wilson, master of the Ulysses (burden 350 tons), offers his ship 
upon freight for Bantam ; he is told that his stay there would be 
but sixty days, his demurrage 7/. per day, the like sum to be 
deducted daily for so many days as the ship is dispatched within 
the time before specified ; that he must take some beef and pork 
from the Company at the current price; that he must bring i5cwt. 



336 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

net of pepper to a ton, and 10 cwt. net of cloves, and have 21/. per 
ton freight. These conditions he is desired to consider by next 
Wednesday, when his offer shall be replied to. Stephen Boulton, 
John Brett, Samuel Crispe, and William Vaughan accepted as 
securities for indigo bought by Messrs. Boulton and Brett from the 
Company. Anthony Panton is entertained to go as minister in the 
Crispiana and return in her, or in the Aleppo Merchant, whichever 
leaves last, at a salary of 50/. per annum, and 10/. to buy books ; 
and should he require another 10/. or 30/. it shall be imprested to 
him on account of his wages. Some shirts and quilts, now in Mr. 
Bowen's custody, to be given to Thomas Clarke. (2 //.) 

' A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
March 9, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 138). 

Mr. Sidery, master of the Dolphin, who brought the pipestaves 
from Ireland, to be paid 80/. on account. Thomas Steevens's bill 
of i/. I4J-. for boathire, &c., to be paid. Sir Thomas Culpepper 
offering to sell the Company 1,500 load of timber now ready to be 
felled in Kent, Edward Steevens is directed to view and report on 
the same. John Millett, master of the Aleppo Merchant, is given 
30/. as a gratuity in lieu of primage and average. Henry Bayne- 
brigge, having underwritten for 3,000/. in this Particular Voyage, is 
admitted to the freedom of the Company on payment of 5/. 
William Peacocke and Rebecca his wife, administratrix of her late 
husband, George Morgan, who died in the Indies, petition for 300/. 
remaining in the Company's hands for the use of George Morgan, 
Rebecca's son, she being his guardian ; they are told that by an 
order from Sir Henry Martyn, the late judge of the Prerogative 
Court, this money has already been detained eleven or twelve years 
in the Company's hands for the use of the child, and interest allowed 
to them, and the Company intends to retain it until the said child 
is twenty-one, and only to pay them the interest for his maintenance. 
Certain Committees to treat with Mr. Willson, master of the Ulysses, 
or any other master or owner, for the purchase or freighting of a ship 
for Bantam about the middle of next month ; and to effect this 
more speedily, Steevens is ordered to scan the river for a suitable 
vessel of about 300 or 400 tons burden. {}\pp') 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 237 

A General Court of the Adventurers in the Third 
Joint Stock, March 9, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 130). 

The Governor observes that this meeting has been called because, 
on review of the accounts from India, it is found that when the 
Mary, William, Reformation, and Swan return laden from Bantam 
there will still remain there 11,000/. or 12,000/. of stock, sufficient to 
lade a ship of 300 or 400 tons burden with 2,000 bags of pepper, 
which by the blessing of God may yield 40,000/. ; and as they ought 
to advance the Third Joint Stock as much as possible, the Court of 
Committees think it advisable to send a ship of this size with 
sufficient quick stock to defray customs and other charges, more 
especially as if this is not done there may be no pepper next year. 
The Committees have gone so far as to treat with one ship to be 
freighted and are in quest of another, but it is not proposed that the 
Company shall pay anything before receiving the goods. One of 
the Committees remarks that in his opinion it would be better and 
more profitable for the Third Joint Stock to forbear sending a ship 
to Bantam until news is received from thence, for if one be dispeeded 
and no lading found for her, loss would be sustained by her lying 
so many days at demurrage. To this the Governor replies that the 
benefit to be gained is far greater than the loss to be feared can be, 
as the adventurers in this Particular Voyage expect no pepper next 
year ; therefore those in the Third Joint Stock can do no harm by 
providing for themselves. If a ship be sent in April (the safest and 
easiest way to save charge), she may be expected back within nine- 
teen months, when there will be no pepper in town ; and if the old 
adventurers want stock this Particular Voyage will supply it. This 
opinion is seconded by one who thinks that, if 2,000/. be paid for 
demurrage, still a gain of 30,00c/. or 40,000/ may be made. By 
desire the Governor puts it to the question and by a general erection 
of hands it is agreed to send a ship to Bantam as proposed ; and it 
is left to the Court of Committees to decide whether to freight or 
buy a vessel for this purpose. Mr. Governor reports that the Court 
of Committees has lately presented a petition in the Company's 
name to the House of Commons for removal of the obstructions and 
impediments to its trade, notably the great impost placed upon East 
Indian commodities, the disturbance caused to the said trade by 



338 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Sir William Courteene and on his death by his son and Endymion 
Porter, and the injuries offered by the Dutch, more particularly in 
the murder of the Company's factors at Amboyna. The Court of 
Committees thinks of having the Amboyna book reprinted, but 
before doing so desires to know the opinion of the generality herein. 
Thereupon it is unanimously agreed to have 1,000 copies forthwith 
printed, with such additions as the Court of Committees thinks 
fitting. Mrs. Mary Muschampe again presents her petition for relief, 
and is granted 25°^- The Governor observes that the Auditor and 
Accountant should deliver in a balance of the Company's estate by 
the end of May, but cannot do so, because six of the adventurers, 
viz. Robert Bell, John Cooke, Andrew Coggan, Richard Moorer, 
Isaac Van Paine, and Richard Harris, are in brokes ; Harris has 
underwritten for 300/. in the Third Joint Stock and paid in 75/., the 
other five have underwritten for several sums in the same Stock but 
paid nothing in, therefore the Court of Committees is inclined to sink 
their adventures, as all the subscriptions do not come to more than 
3,500/. ; by general consent this matter is referred to the decision 
of the said Court. The Governor reports that there are many 
parcels of silk, calicoes, and cloves, which the adventurers may 
receive upon divisions, for which the Company will not be respon- 
sible ; he also states that any adventurer in this Particular Voyage 
may underwrite one-twentieth part of his subscription in the policy 
of assurance for coral from Leghorn. (3!^ pp.) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
March 16, 1642 [Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 133). 

The wife of Francis Cotton, minister in the London, to be given 
3/. upon account of her husband's salary, over and above the 5/. due 
unto her quarterly. Upon receipt of a letter from Sir William 
Russell and the other Commissioners of His Majesty's Navy con- 
cerning timber lent to the Company about two years ago, Messrs. 
Fotherby and Steevens are directed to see that similar timber is 
returned into the King's yard, or that satisfaction is made for it in 
money. John Langley, merchant, executor to his father, Richard 
Langley, transfers to John Holloway, Esq., 1,145/. ^^^' ^^- adven- 
ture and profits in the Third Joint Stock, the principal of which is 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 239 

divided ; and Francis Smithwicke transfers to the said John Hollo- 
way 100/. adventure and profits in the same Stock, of which the 
principal is also divided. (| /.) 

A Court of Committees, March 19, 1642 ^ {Court Book, vol. 
xviii, p. 134). 

The Governor informs Mr. Courteene that, in accordance with an 
order from Sir Henry Vane and the Committee of Parliament, he 
has been sent an abstract of some injuries which the East India 
Company has received from his trading, that these may be avoided 
in the future ; and he desires Mr. Courteene to propose some 
method of settling this business. The Company is willing to take 
all his goods and moneys now provided at cost price, which will be 
no loss to him, also his shipping for ready money ; for his goods 
abroad or those expected home, it will be most to his advantage for 
these to stand upon his own adventure and for him to receive them 
himself, and not to send out any more, but to adventure what he 
pleases in the next subscription with the Company. Mr. Courteene 
desires time to consider these proposals and promises a speedy 
answer. Henry Robinson is permitted to send two cwt. of coarse 
' brutoora' ^ coral in the Aleppo Merchant on his own account, on 
condition that the proceeds are not returned in any commodity 
usually traded in by the Company, (i p.) 

A Court of Committees, March ai, 1642^ (Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 135). 

The Governor intimates that he presumes Mr. Courteene has 
come resolved to compose all differences without troubling Parlia- 
ment any more, and that the Company is willing to accept any 
reasonable offers ; whereupon Mr. Courteene proposes that he shall 
bring in all his stock, both abroad and at home, and be allowed to 
adventure it in this Particular Voyage. The Governor replies that 
Mr. Courteene can give in an account of his stock in England and 
that the Company will take it from him, but it will have nothing to 
do with his stock abroad, which he had much better have home 

^ Mr. Courteene and Mr. Gobert were also present. 
' An Italian trade term for a rough variety of coral. 
* Messrs. Courteene and Rushoult were also there. 



240 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

upon his own adventure ; that if after the return of his ships any 
debts of his are brought into the Company's cash, for these he 
shall be allowed at a reasonable rate per dollar ; or any goods of 
his remaining after the return of his ships the Company will bring 
home upon freight, or allow him to dispatch an empty ship to fetch 
them, or take them from him at a reasonable value, or in proportion 
as the next Stock shall allow for the said goods ; but Mr. Courteene 
cannot be permitted to adventure in this Particular Voyage, as the 
stock provided for it must not be mixed up with any other venture, 
but he may put what sum he pleases to the next subscription. The 
Company will take all the stock he has in England at its prime 
cost, in order to prevent his three ships interrupting its trade ; but 
all that returns in his five ships must come upon his own account, 
and when they arrive Mr. Courteene and the Company can arrange 
for the sale of the goods returned that no prejudice be done to 
either party. Mr. Governor represents what a loss it will be to the 
kingdom if, through Mr. Courteene rejecting these fair proposals, 
the trade should fall through, and advises him to consider who 
would have to answer for it, the Company having done its duty. 
Mr. Courteene and his friend Mr. Rushoult withdrawing, by desire, 
to consider all this, the Court then conceives some further proposi- 
tions and delivers a copy of them to Mr. Courteene, They are to 
the following effect : the Company is content to take all money and 
merchandise laden in Mr. Courteene's three ships now preparing at 
the prices they cost and pay him in money for all, or to permit 
him to adventure all, or such part as he pleases, in this Particular 
Voyage intended for this year only ; the ships Mr. Courteene has 
already abroad to be returned according to his directions and upon 
his own account, the Company to have nothing to do with them ; 
if Mr. Courteene can show that he has more goods abroad than he 
has ships to bring them home in, he can send out one or two of the 
ships now making ready to fetch the said goods, provided no new 
stock, either in money or goods, is sent in them ; if Mr. Courteene 
has more remaining, requiring a longer time to be recovered, the 
Company will allow for the same in England within three months 
after notice at the rate of ^s. per rial of eight for what shall be 
delivered into its cash there, or else bring it home on freight at 
a reasonable rate. An order is received from the House of 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 341 

Commons commanding the Company to forbear the further 
printing of the Amboyna books now in the press, and that they 
be taken to Sir Henry Vane, chairman of the committee for the 
Company's business ; the Court directs the Secretary to see that 
this order is obeyed, and expressly commands that the books be 
sealed up this night and taken in the morning to Sir Henry Vane. 
(2| //•) 

A Court of Committees, March 22, 1642' {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 138). 

The Governor desires to know what propositions Mr. Courteene 
has to make in answer to those he received from the Company, 
and informs him it is thought right that he should give an account 
of his three ships, with a copy of his last letters and commissions 
sent to the Indies, and also a copy of his last advices received 
from thence. The Governor likewise desires to know what stock 
Mr. Courteene intends to send in the two freighted ships to fetch 
home his remains, and which of the three ships is intended for the 
coast of India and which for Sumatra. Mr. Courteene replies that 
all are designed for India and all are to return from thence. The 
Governor inquires whether, on the Company taking the three ships 
and their stock, Mr. Courteene will surrender his patent and agree 
never to send out any more, only to receive what is due to him and 
what shall return in his five ships. Hereupon Mr. Courteene 
alleges that he has an estate in China. He is again told that the 
Company will not object to his sending out an empty ship to fetch 
any remains he has in India, and that if the propositions do not 
satisfy him it is not the Company's fault ; he has certainly inter- 
rupted its trade and is still doing so, and for redress and prevention 
of this the Company has, as in duty bound, acquainted Parliament, 
to whose regulation this business must be left. After much debate 
the differences between the Company and Mr. Courteene are stated 
as follows : the Company is content to take one of Mr. Courteene's 
ships, but he expects all three to be taken ; the Company expects 
Mr. Courteene to bring his remains to its factors and ships, whereas 
he expects the Company to fetch them ; Mr. Courteene expects the 

^ Mr. Courteene, Sir William Palmer, and Messrs. Rushoult and Gobert attended. 

S.C.M. II K 



242 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Company to take off his remains in China, but it is resolved not to 
meddle with them. Hereupon Mr, Governor states his positive 
opinion that the Company will neither fetch away Mr. Courteene's 
goods nor take more than one of his ships, though it will not 
object to the other two being sent out if they go empty ; yet for 
fear of the worst it would consent to Mr. Courteene sending i,ooo/. 
or 2,000/. in them, and Mr. Governor advises him not to send all 
the goods he has provided, in order to avoid leaving any remains in 
the East. As no conclusion is come to, these differences are left to 
be determined by Parliament. {2^ pp) 

A Court of Committees, March 24, 1642 {Cotirt Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 140). 

The order drawn up yesterday by Sir Henry Vane and the 
committee appointed by Parliament concerning the dispute between 
the Company and Mr. Courteene is read ; the Court ' submitt 
thereunto as their act according as it is amended . . . and desire 
that the same may bee reported to the Commons house of Parlya- 
ment'; whereupon Sir Nicholas Crispe and Mr. Ashwell are 
entreated to inform Mr. Ash, who has been appointed chairman of 
the said committee in the absence of Sir Henry Vane. The Court, 
on hearing of the ability of Francis Breton, who is second at Surat, 
decrees that he shall succeed William Fremlyn as President at that 
place, at a salary of 350/. per annum. (| p.) 

Petition of the East India Company to the House of 
Commons, [March, 1642]^ {Public Record Office: East Indies, 
vol. ivB, No. 82). 

Showing that a debt of 63,283/. 95-. is owing to the Company for 
pepper bought by Lord Cottington for the King's use. That the 
new Farmers discounted the customs on goods returned from the 
East Indies in the Caesar m February, 1640 [1641], which amounted 
to 3,905/. 8j., on those returned in the Crispian in June, 1641, which 
amounted to 9,073/. \is. 6d., and on those returned in the Hopeivell 
in August, 1 64 1, which amounted to 3,123/. 6s. J id., thus leaving 
47,1 81/. \s. "jd. still owing, and a further 14,000/. due next 

* This seems to be the petition which was read to the House on March 26. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 243 

September. The Company prays that the said discounts may be 
allowed, in consideration of the great hindrance to its trade should 
the money be detained, that the House will assist in the speedy 
recovery of what still is and shall be due, and that some allowance 
may be made for forbearance, because of the Company's great debt 
at interest. (| /.) 

Sir William Boswell at the Hague to Sir Thomas Roe, 
March 28,1642 {Public Record Office: Dom. Chas. /,vol. cccclxxxix, 
No. 98). 

The East India Company, I hear, caused the business of 

Amboina to be reprinted, thereby to acquaint and possess the 
Parliament with the same ; why, I cannot imagine. Sure I am I 
have given no just cause, the treaty I have in hand being now at 
a better issue than ever, and myself most faithful to them in the 
justice of their cause and in accord with the King. 

A Court of Committees, April i, 1642 {Court Book,wo\. xviii, 
p. 141). 

A bill of exchange for 54/. presented by Mr. Perryn for money 
taken up in Ireland by John Sidery, master of the Dolphin, to be 
paid and charged to William Newman's account. A demiculverin 
or a saker to be delivered to Mr. Bowen. Mr. Willson, master of 
the Ulysses, to pay 400/. for beef and pork. (| /.) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
April 6, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 142). 

William Rolfe, uncle and executor of the late Jasper Rolfe, to be 
paid all wages and estate due to the latter, detained in regard of 
the eighty rials of eight paid to redeem him from captivity in 
India. Mr. Hugh Wood, having adventured 500/. in this Particular 
Voyage, is admitted to the freedom of the Company on payment of 
5/.; but claiming freedom by service, having been apprenticed to 
the late Captain Lewis Roberts, he is desired to produce his inden- 
ture, when, if it shall appear that such freedom is his due, the 5/. 
shall be remitted. Thomas Russell is allowed twenty marks for 
damaged silk. On consideration of the accounts of Robert Bell, 

R 2 



244 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

John Cooke, Andrew Coggan, Richard Moorer, and Isaac Van Payne, 
who severally underwrote for certain sums in the Third Joint Stock 
but have paid in nothing, and of the account of Richard Harris, 
who underwrote for 300/. and paid in 75/., the Court resolves to 
make a general order for them all and refer the same for confirma- 
tion to the next general court, viz., that they shall be adventurers 
only for so much of their money as is in the Company's hands, the 
remainder to be sunk, they to pay neither brokes nor interest, and 
to receive all such divisions as shall appear due on their several 
accounts. Thomas Clarke petitioning for part of his wages is 
advised to have his account perfected and then his petition shall be 
considered. Henry Cowly, an old servant of the Company, is given 
40s. from the poor-box. John Burridge is granted admission to the 
Almshouse at Poplar with the usual allowance. (2f pj>.) 

Suggestions for Payment of the Money owing to the 
Company for Pepper [? March, 1642] {Public Record Office: 
East Indies, vol. iv B, No. 81 II). 

Stating that the pepper cost, at four six months payment, 
63,283/. iij. i^., but being sold for ready money fetched 
50,626/. 17^. \d. There was thus a loss of 5,753/. n^. 'i-d. by 
interest, and of 6,903/. is. iid. in price. That if the 9,000/. 
detained for custom of its goods be allowed the Company, the debt 
will then be 54,000/., for satisfaction of which sum it is humbly 
offered for consideration that there is an entire fee farm rent of 
500/. per annum for the manors of Bradbury and Hilton in the 
bishopric of Durham, which if the King would sell outright would 
yield 9,000/. or 10,000/.; that other fee farm rents may be made 
choice of and sold to raise a further considerable sum, and that 
some assignment may be made upon the Forest of Dean, to be paid 
after the Earl of Salisbury and Mr. Browne, the gunfounder, are 
satisfied on their assignments ; that when the tonnage and pound- 
age is settled, the Company may be paid the remainder of the debt, 
with the interest, from the customs on its own commodities. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 345 

Application to the King concerning the Money owing 
TO THE Company for Pepper [? March, 1642] {Public Record 
Office : East Indies^ vol. ivB, No. 81 III). 

Four of the bonds given for payment of this money are already 
due ; and for these the Company has detained the custom on its 
goods, amounting to about 12,000/., which Parliament, at the 
instigation of young Sir Henry Vane, has ordered ^ to be paid 
into the Exchequer for supply of the Navy. Of this sum, 9,000/. 
was due before the assignments on the customs were taken away, 
and a tally and legal discharge for it has already been passed in the 
Exchequer ; therefore it may not be much insisted upon. On the 
5th instant the Committee for Tonnage and Poundage ordered 
the Company to pay 3,000/. to the Exchequer, which it is content 
to do if it may be quit of the other. If this 9,000/. is allowed 
to the Company, there will then be owing to it about 54,000/., for 
satisfaction of which it is humbly suggested that the King should 
sell some of his many parks, which are of little use and very costly, 
some small rent only to be reserved for the Crown. That the 
entire fee farm rent of 500/. per annum in the manors of Bradbury 
and Hilton in the bishopric of Durham, if sold, would yield 10,000/. ; 
and that 6,000/. per annum is offered for six years for wood from 
the Forest of Dean, not returned as ship timber, and 1,000/. per 
annum for the soil ; and that some assignments may be made upon 
these after the Earl of Salisbury and Mr. Browne, the gunfounder, 
have been satisfied, (i p. Note: No. 81 IV is a draft of the 
above paper.) 

Lord Cottington at Fonthill to the King, April i, 
1642 {Public Record Office: East Indies, vol. iv B, No. 83). 

Is informed that Parliament has resolved to force the East India 
Company to repay the 12,000/. it has received from customs on its 
goods in part payment of the pepper debt, thus making it determine 
to sue the bonds given for payment, and especially his own, he 
having bought the said pepper. If this is done, it will sweep away 
all his estate and expose him to the scorn of his enemies. His life 
and fortune are of little value to him in comparison with his service 

^ March 26, 1642 (Commons' Journal). 



245 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

to the King, but in this case his ruin would be disadvantageous 
to the honour and service of His Majesty. He therefore prays the 
King to write to the Company, and to direct the Chancellor of the 
Exchequer and the Commissioners of the Revenue to prevail upon 
It to forbear until the royal affairs can be accommodated, when the 
debt shall be paid. Has sent this letter by an express messenger, 
who can give more particular information. [Holograph, i /.) 

Lord Cottington at Fonthill to Secretary Nicholas, 
April i, 1642 {Public Record Office: Dom. Chas. I, vol. ccccxc, 
No. I). 

The East India Company having resolved to sue our bonds for 
the pepper debt, I have sent a letter to the King, whereof the 
bearer will show you a copy. That which is to be done must be 
with expedition and effectual. The King's letter must be very 
earnest and promising, and the Commissioners [of the Treasury] 
must be made to take it to heart, all which I leave to your care 
and favour, (i /.) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
April 8, 1643 [Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 144). 

Mr. Governor reports that he lately had a conference with 
Sir John Culpepper, Chancellor of the Exchequer, concerning the 
differences between the Company and the Dutch, when Sir John 
told him that he had received a packet from the King respecting 
this matter, and therefore he desired to know how the business now 
stands, promising to perform any office of courtesy in his power 
for the Company. The Governor offered to supply him with copies 
of the papers sent to Sir Henry Vane and to Sir Edward Nicholas, 
which would acquaint him fully with the Company's demands ; but 
Sir John seeming unwilling to receive these, the Governor then told 
him how that, notwithstanding all the wrongs and injuries received 
from the Dutch, whereby the Company had sustained damages 
amounting to ' many hundred thousand of pounds ', yet by a private 
treaty it had consented to accept 500,000 guilders in full satisfaction 
of the same, provided that the right and interest in the island 
of Pollaroone was resei-ved to it ; but because of this proviso the 
Dutch refuse to pay the 500,000 guilders. As to the massacre 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 247 

at Amboyna, that was always held to be ' in the power of His 
Majesty '. The Governor desiring to know, in case Sir John (who 
has to return an answer to-night to the packet sent him by the King) 
should send for him again, what else to acquaint him with, is told 
that he has said all there is to be said. Mr. Willson, master of 
the Ulysses^ reports that he has stowed most of his beef and pork. 
Anne Dyne is given 10s. from the poor-box. There not being 
a full court, Thomas Clarke and Richard Hudson are desired to 
appear next Friday, when their business shall be concluded. 

The King at York to the Lords of the Treasury, 
April 12, 1642 {Public Record Office: East Indies^ vol. iv B, 
No. 84). 

States that he is indebted to the East India Company for 
a great sum of money payable at various dates for pepper bought 
to supply his pressing occasions. That for this sum many of his 
servants stand engaged and the Company threatens to sue them, 
as the former assignments given have become void. That he is 
bound in honour and justice to preserve from prejudice those em- 
ployed to buy the said pepper, and therefore commands the Lords 
to treat with the Governor and others of the Company and to give 
them satisfaction, either out of the particulars expressed in the 
enclosed paper or by other means held more fitting and as satis- 
factory to them, until the debt and interest due upon it be paid, 
which he is resolved shall be done. They are also to use their best 
endeavours to satisfy the Company, that all who stand engaged 
may be freed from any prejudice in their credits or estates by their 
engagement for this debt, for which this letter is to be the warrant. 
{Copy. I /.) 

The King at York to the East India Company, 
April 12, 1642 {Public Record Office: East Indies, vol. iv B, 
No. 84 I). 

Many of his servants having engaged themselves by bond more 
than a year ago for payment for pepper bought of the Company 
for the royal use, and the assignments then given having become 
invalid, the King, feeling bound in honour and justice to see the 



348 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

said debt discharged and his servants freed from their engagement, 
has commanded the Commissioners of the Treasury to treat with 
the Company and to give some good assignments for payment 
of what remains due of the said debt, which he is resolved shall 
be met. He therefore doubts not but that the Company will take 
into consideration his many occasions and the state of the times, 
and accept what is reasonable, which shall be taken as a testimony 
of loyal affection. {Copy. \p.) 

*A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
April 15, 1642 [Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 146). 

William and Rebecca Peacocke to be given the 200/. remaining 
in the Company's hands for the use of George Morgan, on Peacocke 
giving a bond with Meredith Jones on behalf of Morgan to repay 
this sum to the latter on his attaining his majority. Four or more 
Committees desired to examine the accounts presented for repair 
of the Hopewell, Blessing, and Crispian. A letter from the King 
to the Company concerning the pepper debt is read and handed 
to Mr. Massingberd, who is desired to confer with Lord Say and 
Mr. Greene about it. John Hunter to be lent 200/. gratis for six 
months, or to be allowed this sum at the clearing of his account. 
Thomas Clarke, formerly a factor at Masulipatam, ordered to give 
bond to pay what is due to the Company on his account within six 
months. Mr. Acton's bill of 22/. y. 6d. to be paid, (i^ //.) 

'A Meeting of Mr. Governour and divers of the 
Committees,' April 20, 1642 [Court Book, vol. xviiij p. 147). 

On consideration of the demands made by Thomas Chauncy, the 
Court does not think it necessary to allow him the desired 50/. per 
annum from Michaelmas, 1626, to Michaelmas, 1628, during which 
time he was suspended from the Company's service, nor to com- 
pensate him further for his services at Plymouth ; but with regard 
to the reduction of his salary for 3I years it is thought that, as 
others had theirs reduced and afterwards raised to the full allow- 
ance, Chauncy should be given 40/. in satisfaction of all his demands ; 
but decision is referred to the next court, (i /.) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 249 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
April 22, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 148). 

A Persian, with his man and boy and fifty-one chests of goods, 
is allowed to take passage in the Ulysses for Bantam on payment 
of 500 rials of eight, 120 whereof to be given to the master of the 
ship for diet and the use of a cabin ; he is to make his own arrange- 
ments for getting from Bantam either to Surat or Persia. Benjamin 
De La Noy transfers 400/. adventure with all profits in this 
Particular Voyage to James Herewyn, who is admitted by re- 
demption, paying 13/. 6s. Sd. A letter is read from Sir George 
Whitmore, Sir Nicholas Raynton, and other commissioners for 
leasing the lands formerly belonging to Sir Thomas Gresham, 
in which it is intimated that the Company has for many years 
rented the cellar under the Exchange for 24/. per annum and that 
more has lately been offered for it, but if the Company will treat 
at the next Court of Committees to be held at Gresham College 
for a lease of the said premises it shall be listened to ; the Governor 
and Sir John Gayre are desired to confer with Sir George Whitmore 
and Sir Nicholas Raynton about this. The petition of Mr. Richard 
Norton and Mr. Thimbleby, executors of the late Thomas 
Thimbleby, concerning 20/. formerly paid to Mr. Sherburne, is 
referred with their consent to Sir John Wolstenholme and 
Mr. William Ashwell, and the Court also directs that Mrs. Sher- 
burne be spoken to about it. (i| pp.) 

Sir William Boswell at the Hague to Sir Thomas 

Roe, :^^1^EiA^, 1642 (Pudlic Record Office: Dom. CJias. /, vol. 
May 5 

ccccxc, No. 17). 

Sir Henry Vane is in the chair for the trade of the kingdom, 

and specially entrusted with the business of Amboina and the East 

India differences, so that I am almost at a final stand with a 

mertdsse pocnitet 



A Court of Committees, April 26, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 150). 

Canvas to be bought to make pepper bags. The Court con- 
siders the expediency of sending the Ulysses to Bantam, as by 



250 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

advices received from thence it appears that goods will be wanted 
to fill up the ships already there. After much dispute it is agreed 
by erection of hands to send the said vessel, with 5,000/. or 6,000/. 
to pay the Company's debts, and that if money shall be wanted for 
her lading it shall be supplied by this Stock, provided that the 
adventurers in the old Stock and in this Particular Voyage consent. 
To ascertain this a general court of all such adventurers is ordered 
to meet next Friday. The master of the Ulysses to be paid 
100 dollars by the President at Bantam for the diet of the Persian 
who is to go in his ship, (i p) 

A General Court of the Adventurers in the Old 
Stock and in the Particular Voyage, April 29, 1642 
{Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 151). 

The minutes of the last general court having been read, 
Mr. Governor reports the arrival of the Maiy, for which he declares 
there is great cause for thankfulness to God, for a Company's ship 
has never before made such a speedy return, and she has brought 
100 tons of goods more than she ever brought before, with intimation 
of other returns this summer. He further relates that by the 
general letter received from Bantam it appears that there may 
be some want of stock to relade the ships there, and the Court of 
Committees fears there will not be sufficient to lade the Ulysses 
(now almost ready for dispatch) ; he therefore hopes this court will 
not be against sending in her 2,000/. or 3,000/. more than was 
formerly agreed upon, in order to complete her lading at Bantam. 
He then commands that part of the general letter to be read which 
shows that because only six chests of rials of eight were sent in the 
Mary and the William, the Company is now indebted 11,000 rials. 
The main reason for this is because the factors at Masulipatam 
diverted a great part of the stock designed for Bantam, and the non- 
arrival there of the Reformation from the Coast ; besides, the 
200 tons of cloves provided and now upon their way have taken up 
much stock. Mr. Governor thinks this proposition to send sufficient 
money to lade the Ulysses home should be readily assented to, for 
no harm can be done by it, as no money is to be taken up at 
interest to supply this want ; neither will the adventurers divide 
anything less because of it. One of the generality remarks that it 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 251 

will be very prejudicial to the adventurers in this Particular Voyage, 
they having underwritten on the promise that the Third Joint 
Stock should send out nothing more. The Governor replies that 
in former Voyages there has been no such restraint, and it is 
a mystery to him why there should be one imposed on the Third 
Joint Stock, which has suffered so much and borne the heat of the 
day. He hopes the adventurers in this Particular Voyage will give 
the adventurers in the Third Joint Stock leave to pay their debts, 
which will be no prejudice to them, for if the Company has no 
pepper to supply the kingdom the Dutch will do it ; this motion is 
not made to increase the trade, but from necessity, and if the new 
adventurers will lend the Third Joint Stock money at Bantam none 
need be sent out. He is desired to put this to the question, and all 
who are not adventurers in this Particular Voyage are requested to 
withdraw ; whereupon he asks those who will consent to the 
adventurers in the Third Joint Stock sending 32,000 rials of eight 
to Bantam in the Ulysses^ on condition that the adventurers in this 
Particular Voyage shall have liberty to send the remainder of their 
stock either now or when they please, to hold up their hands ; when 
the motion is agreed to. The old adventurers returning, the 
Governor asks them whether they are now willing that 32,000 
rials of eight shall be sent in the Ulysses, and they unanimously 
consent. Mr. Governor desires the court to consider the advis- 
ability of a new book being opened for subscriptions, as if it shall 
appear that the Company is slack the trade to India will be left open 
to all men. As an inducement for a large subscription there is 
encouragement both from abroad and at home, for Parliament will 
yield to anything in reason ; and therefore the Company is re- 
newing its patent, which will doubtless be confirmed with further 
enlargements. (3 //.) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
May 4, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 154). 

The inhabitants of Poplar and Blackwall petition for ground 
for a church, churchyard, and a dwelling house for a minister 
in that hamlet. The Court is inclined to favour so pious a work, 
but not without first consulting a general court ; therefore the 
Beadle is ordered to summon one to meet next Friday morning, 



2,52 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

and meanwhile Mr, Bowen is directed to go to Blackwall and view 
the ground behind the hospital desired for this purpose, A remon- 
strance is read, presented by Benjamin Whitcombe, on behalf 
of Sir Morris Abbott, about divers * ballast ' rubies and emeralds 
which the latter had leave to adventure to India in 1621 and which 
were sold by Robert Younge, the Company's factor at Agra. 
Ordered that the papers be looked up, and Younge questioned 
about the matter. Consideration is resumed of the dispute between 
Richard Hudson and Thomas Clarke. The former is found to 
be indebted to the Company 638/. 10s., of which 450/. is for i,8co 
rials of eight charged upon him as having been taken from Clarke's 
room ; this Hudson denies, and on examination it is found that the 
said rials were sold by Clarke himself for pagothaes ^, whereupon it 
is generally agreed to absolve Hudson and charge them to Clarke's 
account ; and though Hudson is still a debtor to the Company for 
188/. 10.J., yet on account of his poverty, and on his signing a 
general release, the Court agrees to bestow upon him iccl, and as 
he has served the Company twenty-nine years he is allowed to 
apply for the post of purser in the next ship to be dispeeded ; for 
all which he returns humble thanks. With regard to Clarke, the 
Court orders that, on his giving a general release, signing a bond to 
pay six months hence all that is due to the Company (including the 
said r,8co rials of eight), and making an assignment of his salary 
and his estate in the Company's hands, he shall receive his calicoes 
now in the custody of Mr. Bowen. (2//>,) 

A General Court of all the Adventurers, May 6, 1642 
{Court Book^ vol. xviii, p, 156). 

The Governor intimates that this court has been called to give 
its consent to the bestowal of half an acre of ground behind the 
hospital at Poplar to build a church, and for a churchyard for 
Poplar and Blackwall. The ground cost the Company nothing, 
but has been endowed by the charity of those employed in the 
Indies, who on return home have willingly contributed id. in the 
pound from their wages. The court accords a willing assent, and 

' The South Indian coin known a» a ' pagoda ', 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 253 

Sir John Gayre and Captain Styles are entreated to set out the 
desired ground, and the sixty loads of stones behind the hospital 
are given towards the foundation of the church, (i p.) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
May II, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 157). 

Roger Clarke to receive 42/. out of the wages of Thomas Wheeler, 
a factor in Persia, in accordance with the latter's request. Mr, Ac- 
ton's bill of 12/. qs. \od. for law charges to be paid. James, son of 
the late David Stannyer, a free brother of the Company, desires to 
be made free by patrimony, and states that he has served an 
apprenticeship to Mr. Giles Vandepitt, also a free brother ; he 
is told that he cannot claim his freedom by patrimony, his father 
having been made free about twelve years before [sic. ? after] his 
birth ; while ' for his service with Mr. Vandepitt, in regard strangers 
doe not serve their masters in the nature as freemen of London 
apprentices doe, therefore it was not due to him that way '. Here- 
upon Stannyer refers himself to the Court, begging consideration 
of the great losses sustained by his father in being an adventurer ; 
for these reasons he is admitted to the freedom on paying a fine of 
61. Ordered that 52/. 2s. 2d. be paid for subsidy and impost 
on the coral brought from Leghorn in the Margaret Constance. 
Nathaniel, son of Melchisedec Griggs, who died in the Dolphin, to 
be paid 10/. belonging to his late father's estate. Mr. Willson, 
master of the Ulysses, to be given 30/. instead of primage and 
average, {i^pp-) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
May 18, 1642 [Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 158). 

One ruby and two diamond rings in the custody of the Company 
to be delivered to Roger Calcot, administrator of Robert Coulson. 
John Spiller appointed land-purser to the Mary on her arrival 
at Erith, and permitted to choose his assistant. All the refined 
saltpetre to be sold at i id. per lb. Steevens being pressed to give 
satisfaction to the Commissioners of the Navy for timber borrowed 
from the King, the Governor issued a warrant for Mr. Pett to 
be given satisfaction in plank at the rate of 3/. 13^. 4'^^- pcr load ; 
this warrant the Court now confirms, and directs Steevens to 



254 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

present a note of the quantity of plank due. Resolution as to the 
purchase of timber is deferred. Casks ordered to be made from the 
pipe and hogshead staves, and additional staves to be bought. 
Ordered that interest be paid by this Particular Voyage to the old 
Joint Stock from the middle of last January to the present time for 
the coral brought from Leghorn and shipped in the Crispiana and 
Aleppo Merchant. Mr. Woodall to be paid 250/. on account of 
surgeons' chests. {^iPP-) 

A Court of Committees, May 20, 1642 (Couri Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 160). 

Resolved that no timber be bought from Peter Pett at Shoreham. 
Thomas Chauncy renews his former demands ; he is advised to 
rest content with the 15/. gratification he has already been given for 
his services at Plymouth and not to trouble the Court again, it 
being considered that 40/. per annum was sufficient remuneration 
for his services when employed, and that there is no reason to allow 
him anything for the time he was suspended. The holidays being 
near it is decided not to let the Mary break bulk until Wednesday 
in Whitsun week, and the said ship is ordered to be entered at the 
Custom-house next Thursday. Fotherby is directed to present 
the warrants and receipts for ordnance delivered [' lent ' in marghi] 
to the King, the Prince Palatine, and Mr. Browne, His Majesty's 
gunfounder, next Friday. (i^/A) 

A Court of Committees, May 27, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 161). 

Richard Hudson to be employed in unlading the Mary. Steevens 
ordered to give an estimate for repair of the said ship and of the 
great dock at Blackwall, that the latter may be ready to receive the 
Mary after she is unladen. Mr. Younge is offered the Company's 
saltpetre at 4/. i^s. per hundred, but refuses it, the price being too 
high, (i/.) 

The King at York to the Commissioners of the 
Treasury, June i, 1642 {Public Record Office: Doin. Chas. /, 
vol. ccccxci, No. 1). 

We have considered your certificate of the 15 May, together 
with the petition of the Commissioners of the Customs, our late 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 255 

contractors [for the sale of the pepper], exhibiting a schedule 
of their debts, together with the interest incurred for the same ; 
which we are resolved by all possible ways and means speedily 
to satisfy. Therefore our pleasure is that you present to us a list 
of all our parks, forests, and chases in England and Wales, with 
your opinions of the value of every of them, to the end we may 
speedily give further order how to dispose of them, and that you 
require our Surveyor- General to enter into consideration thereof. 

(I A) 

' A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
June 3, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 162). 

Mr. Acton's bill of 2/. 2s. to be paid. All the refined saltpetre 
sold to Mr. Young at 4/. \os. per hundred, ready money, and 
a friend of his conferred with about the price for mending old 
powder. The powder delivered to Mr. Blyth ordered to be received 
and paid for, but no more to be sent until Mr. Young has been con- 
sulted. Elm timber bought at 29^-. per load. Mrs. Mary Muschampe 
petitions for the remainder of the 250/. bestowed upon her by the 
Company, and returns thanks for the 100/. which she has already 
received ; she is told to await the arrival of the next ships, when if 
there is no cause to the contrary she shall be paid. The men 
in the Mary against whom no exception is taken to be paid their 
wages. Mr. Jaques Oyles about four years ago transferred to the 
late Simon Laurence an adventure of 400/., but as no reference was 
made to the same in the latter's books, there is a doubt whether 
it was not made over to him in trust for someone else ; Laurence's 
widow now desires to receive the benefit, as no claim has been 
made for it ; it is resolved to let the said adventure remain in her 
name and to give her the same division in proportion as other 
adventurers, on receipt of a security from herself and her son to 
save the Company harmless. (2//.) 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
June 8, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 164). 

Richard Swinglehurst's account of 58/. 8j-. for passing the Privy 
Seal for restitution of impost, &c., to be paid ; also a bill presented 
by Bourne, the stationer, for 18/. is. (^d. for printing petitions. 



256 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Amboyna books, &c. The Governor moves that 1,500 or 1,600 
bags of pepper returned in the Mary be sent to Leghorn ; some 
think that goods once arrived in England may not be sent out 
again, but to this it is answered that power is given to the Court of 
Committees by the charter to sell and dispose of the Company's 
goods ; it is then proposed to ofifer the pepper for sale, and if no 
reasonable price can be obtained to send it to Leghorn ; finally this 
matter is referred to the general court to be held this afternoon. 
Edward Freshwater, executor of the late Thomas Freshwater, 
transfers to Richard Cappur 150/., the profit on 1,200/. adventure in 
the Third Joint Stock, formerly in the name of Thomas Colthurst 
in trust for the use of the said Thomas Freshwater, as appears by 
an order of the 38th May, 1641, made by the Master of the Rolls, 
Sir Robert Rich, and Sir Edward Salter. Elwood, keeper of the 
Company's stores at Sandwich, to be directed to bring up his 
account. A gratuity of 40/. given to Robert Fotherby. Contract 
made with Mr. Younge to mend the Company's powder for los. the 
barrel of one cwt., he to be allowed five in the hundred for waste, 
and to fetch and return the powder to Blackwall and bear all 
attendant risks. {\\ pp.) 

A General Court, June 8, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 166). 

The Governor reports that he can give no account of anything 
done in Parliament, neither can he advise the court concerning the 
money expected from the Hollanders, or what is due from the 
State for pepper sold to Lord Cottington, all which when received 
will end the Third Joint Stock and give much encouragement to the 
adventurers ; yet he desires all to be hopeful and not to doubt but 
that in time ' all things will come to a good passe *. The reason of 
their meeting is to consider the disposal of the goods returned in the 
Mary. The Court of Committees thinks that if a good price can 
be obtained for the pepper it should be sold here, but if not, as the 
Company has ' the start of the markett ', it will be well to send 
1,500 or 1,600 bags of the said pepper to Leghorn, the proceeds to 
be returned either in money, coral, or by bills of exchange, as shall 
be directed, and the Company to receive the impost, which will be 
an eighth part of the parcel, in money. More pepper is expected 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 257 

shortly, and the remainder of this parcel will doubtless be sent to 
Turkey, the East Country, Spain, France, and other places. The 
Committees have also suggested insuring the pepper, and that any 
who please should insure his own proportion. The Governor, by 
desire, putting these proposals to the question, it is agreed by 
a general erection of hands to send the said quantity of pepper to 
Leghorn and to leave the disposal of the remainder to the discretion 
of the Court of Committees, (i^ pp) 

A Court of Committees, June 15, 1642 {Coitrt Book, vol. 
xviii, p. 168). 

Captain James of Portsmouth is presented with 5/. 'to buy him 
a beaver hatt,' in acknowledgment of the Company's gratitude to 
him for supplying the Mary with money and necessaries when she 
put into Stokes Bay. Mr. William Garvvay is contracted with to 
carry to Leghorn in his ship the Mercury (burden 330 tons ; her 
master, John Harris) 800 bags of the pepper returned in the Mary, 
at the rate of two and a half dollars per bag, on condition that his 
ship shall be ready to sail from Blackwall by the 5th of July next, 
go direct to Genoa and Leghorn, and take no contraband goods. 
Mr. Saynthill offers to carry a like amount of pepper on the same 
terms to Leghorn in his ship the Victory (burden 300 tons ; her 
master, John Tanner), but does not wish to set sail until the 
loth July ; the Court being unwilling to extend the time, 
Mr. Saynthill resolves to consider and decide by next Friday. 
After some debate it is resolved to send 100 bags of the remaining 
pepper to Messina, and 200 bags to Venice ; also to call a general 
court next Friday afternoon and then propose that the rest be sold 
by IOC bags at \']d. per lb. at four six months for transportation, 
the buyer to receive the impost ; the same to be done by under- 
writing, those underwriting first to be first served, the time for so 
doing to be until next Tuesday night ; all pepper bought for trans- 
portation not to be sent to Italy or Messina, and any not for 
transportation to be bought at i/^?. garbled, at three six months. 
Captain Mynors to pay 25/. freight for spices and sugar brought 
home as private trade in the Mary. Mr. Dove, master of the Mary 
Rose, who brought eighty-three chests of coral from Leghorn, to be 
paid 5/. for primage and for his care in stowing the coral. (2 //.) 



258 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

'A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
June 17, 1642 {Court Booky vol. xviii, p. 170). 

Mr. Saynthill declares that he is willing to consent to his ship 
the Victory carrying 800 bags of the Marys pepper to Leghorn, 
upon the same conditions and terms agreed to by Mr. William 
Garway. The Committees taking into consideration the sale of the 
pepper and the resolution made at the last court to sell it for trans- 
portation at \']d. per lb., now change that price to 18^. per lb., and 
resolve that if any man shall underwrite for the remainder or for 
fifty or one hundred bags at the same price, he shall have it. 
A proposition is made for a fifth division of six or ten per cent, in 
cloves, but nothing is resolved on. John Elyas, a boy who has 
been five years in the Indies and came home in the Mary, to be 
employed at Blackwall and given 3^-. a week for diet and lodging. 
Thomas Gee, master's mate in the Mary, to pay 100/. for freight of 
spices and sugar brought home as private trade. Elizabeth Perry 
and her daughter (whose husbands died in the Mary) to pay 25/., 
and John Tyndall, surgeon in the same ship, to pay 20/., for freight 
of certain goods, (i-^ pp.) 

A General Court, June 17, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 171). 

The Governor reports that since the last meeting the Court of 
Committees has arranged to freight the 1,600 bags of pepper to be 
sent to Leghorn in two good ships at 2^ dollars per bag, to dispose 
of 100 bags to Messina and 200 bags to Venice, and to sell the 
remainder by subscription. The tenor of the preamble to the 
subscription is as follows : liberty is given to any, whether free of 
the Company or not, to underwrite for not less than fifty and not 
more than one hundred bags of the 800 bags remaining of the 
pepper brought home in the Mary, the price for transportation 
being 18^. per lb. sifted, at four six months from the 5th of July, 
the buyer to receive the impost, and those underwriting first to be 
first served, none of the pepper so bought to be sent into Italy or 
the kingdom of Sicily ; and what remains unsubscribed for, the 
Company may export, for the use of the adventurers in the Third 
Joint Stock, to Italy, Sicily, or any place to which those under- 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 259 

writing for the pepper have not sent. This subscription to remain 
open till next Tuesday night, and then, if none of the pepper is 
underwritten for, the Company may ship it wherever it thinks 
proper. The Governor next informs the court that there are 
300 hogshead of cloves in hand, and 150 more expected by the 
William, and that, if the generality agree, the Court of Committees 
is resolved, though the price is low, to divide to each adventurer 
ten per cent, upon his adventure in this commodity at the rate of 
4s. 6d. per lb. sifted, those coming first to be first served and the 
exporter to receive the impost ; provided that if there are not 
sufficient cloves to satisfy all, then money shall be paid in propor- 
tion at two years' time from the ist of July next. This subscription 
is to be open to all men until next Saturday week ; and, for the 
indemnity of the Company, all, or the most part, may be insured, 
which it is thought may be done at easy rates. The proposal is 
thereupon approved. The Governor also represents that if the 
Company intends to proceed with a voyage it will be necessary to 
provide 5,000/. or 6,000/. worth of coral, which will yield to the 
adventurers in the Third Joint Stock considerable profit, besides 
the interest and adventure if they do not make use of it themselves ; 
and this being the time of year to order this profitable commodity, 
he desires the decision of the court. After some debate it is agreed 
to order 5,000/. or 6,ooc/. worth of coral from Leghorn. (3 pp.) 

A General Court of Sales, June 22, 1642 {Cot^n Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 173). 

Sale of green ginger, mace, nutmegs, sugar, cotton yarn, and dust 
of cloves, with prices and names of purchasers. {\p^ 

' A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
June 22, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 174). 

John White, who was disabled in the Company's service and 
returned in the Mary, is admitted to the almshouse at Poplar. The 
Court orders that all who brought home in the Mary as private 
trade not more than four cwt., in sugar or other goods allowed 
by the Company, shall have the same delivered to them free of 
freight, but anything exceeding this quantity must be paid for 
at the accustomed rate; that prohibited goods must not be 

S 2 



26o COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

delivered without an order ; and payment must be made for the 
Company's casks used to pack such trade. Charles Deane, an 
almsman, to be given 20^-. for reading prayers daily in the alms- 
house. Friday, the ist of July, appointed for election of the 
Governor, the Deputy, and the Committees. Ordered that loo 
bags of pepper be sent to Messina and 200 bags to Venice. Upon 
the request of Stephen Bourman, who bought pepper at 18^/. 
per lb. at four six months and was to receive the impost, it is 
resolved that he shall only pay i6d. per lb. and that the Company 
shall receive the impost ; the said Stephen Bourman, John Hobson, 
and George Longe are accepted as securities for the pepper. 
William Thomas is permitted to place fifty loads of timber on the 
Company's wharf at Deptford, and directed to pay what rent 
Fotherby thinks fitting. It is resolved that no one indebted to 
the Company shall be allowed, without special order, to receive the 
division of ten per cent, in cloves formerly resolved upon ; and 
Sir John Wolstenholme, Sir John Gayre, the Deputy, and others 
are entreated to decide on the best course to enforce those indebted 
to the Company to pay what they owe. The wife of Ralph Cart- 
wright, a factor at Bantam, to be allowed to have certain goods, 
their freight to be charged to her husband's account. (2 pp.) 

A Court of Committees, June 28, 1642 [Court Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 176). 

Richard Allen, grocer, Thomas Allen, girdler, and John Allen, 
gentleman, are accepted as securities for nutmegs bought by John 
Allen. Only fifty bags of pepper being underwritten for, it is re- 
solved that 1,200 bags shall be sent to Leghorn, 600 \_sic\ to Genoa, 
TOO to Messina, and 200 to Venice ; and on considering to whom 
to consign the said pepper, Messrs. Throgmorton, Collier, Oxen- 
bridge, Williams, and Roger Abdy are nominated to receive it 
at Leghorn, Messrs. Vandervort and Hobson at Venice, and Messrs. 
Wright and Howe at Genoa ; but resolution herein is deferred. 
For disposal of the remaining pepper, the Court orders that the 
book of subscriptions shall remain open until the next general 
court, that any one may underwrite for it all at 18^. per lb., and the 
buyer may either receive the impost or let the Company do so ; in 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 261 

the latter case he shall only pay i6d. per lb. for the pepper. The 
Court promises not to sell any below this rate until the arrival 
of the next ship, (t p.) 

' A Court of Committees with the Mixt Committees,' 
July i, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 177). 

Thomas Carpenter, an almsman at Blackwall, given lOi-. from 
the poor-box. Mr. Acton's bill of 13/. 10s. to be paid, Mr. Blunt 
ordered to deliver to Captain Mynors the spices he brought home 
in the Mary. Thomas Ivy, a factor at Bantam, having sent home 
certain cloves as private trade, Mr. Blunt is directed to sift them 
and credit the dust to Ivy's account at the same rate as the Com- 
pany have sold theirs ; as regards the cloves themselves, Ivy, who 
is expected home in the William, is to be allowed for the same 
at a fair price. The Court agrees to send 1,400 bags of the Marys 
pepper to Leghorn to Messrs. Job Throckmorton, John Collier, 
Daniel Oxenbridge, Roger Abdy, and Philip Williams in five equal 
parts, who are not only to sell the same but also to provide in 
equal shares 5,000/. or 6,000/. worth of coral. It is also ordered 
that the 400 bags of pepper to be sent to Genoa shall be consigned 
to Messrs. Edward Wright and Roger Howe, and the 100 bags to 
be sent to Messina to Mr. Peter Dorre. Penwarden Rumsey and 
Thomas Thatcher accepted as securities for dust of cloves. Boat- 
swain Ingram's bill of 6/. 19^-. \d. to be paid. Valentine Markham, 
the Auditor, who had 100 nobles deducted from his salary about 
four years ago, is now given 10c/. in requital and as a gratification 
for his services. A dispute arising concerning Mr. Hurt's accounts, 
Mr. Markham assures the Court that he audits the same weekly 
and that nevermore than 200/. remains in Hurt's custody. (li//) 

A General Court of Election, July i, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 182). 

The Governor observes that, as only one hundred bags of pepper 
have been subscribed for and the time limited in the preamble has 
expired, the Court of Committees thinks it would be well to extend 
the time. This is generally agreed to, and it is resolved that any 
man shall be allowed to underwrite for the remaining pepper, fifty 
bags or more at a time. The Governor then declares this to be the 



262 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

day for election of the Governor, Deputy, Treasurer^ and Com- 
mittees ; he thanks the Court for appointing him, resigns his chair, 
and desires that some abler man may be elected to fill it. Hereupon 
he is nominated, with Sir John Wolstenholme, and Sir John Gayre, 
and re-elected Governor ; he returns thanks to the court and takes 
the oath. The Deputy, William Cockayne, then desires that some 
one better able to do the Company service may be chosen in his 
place, but he is nominated, with Thomas Styles and William 
Ashwell, and re-elected Deputy ; he returns his thanks and takes 
the oath. Robert Bateman, the Treasurer, observes that he has 
served long and faithfully, but as he is now very aged he desires to 
retire ; nevertheless he is nominated, with Richard Bateman, and 
by general consent again appointed Treasurer. In place of the 
eight retiring Committees the court elects Sir Nicholas Crispe, 
Messrs. Thomas Burnell, Nathan Wright, Gilbert Keate, Robert 
Sainthill, Robert Abdy, Roger Vivian, and Thomas Rich. Sir 
Henry Garway has been made Governor ; Alderman Highlord and 
Thomas Munn are dead ; Thomas Hodges never appears and has 
not taken the oath ; Sir John Cordell ' by his antiquity ' has been 
appointed Lord Mayor; Alderman Langham chosen sheriff ; and 
Sir Jacob Garrad and Mr. Richard Davies retire. The Committees for 
the ensuing year are therefore Sir John Wolstenholme, Sir Nicholas 
Crispe, Sir Thomas Soame, Sir John Gayre, Sir George Clarke, 
Alderman Reynardson, Messrs. Holloway, Styles, Willson, Burnell, 
Ashwell, Middleton, Kerridge, Massingberd, Methwold, (William) 
Garway, Bateman, Morewood, Wright, Keate, Saynthill, Abdy, 
Vivian, and Rich. The Secretary, Richard Swinglehurst, is put up 
for re-election (with Henry Robinson) and again chosen ; he returns 
thanks and takes the accustomed oath. (2| ;)/>.) 

A Court of Committees, July 6, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 185). 

Messrs. Massingberd and Morewood are desired to direct 
Mr. Pryor to draw up two policies of assurance for the pepper 
shipped in the Mercury and Victory, for which he is to be given 
6/. 13^-, 4^. These policies are only to be underwritten by the 
adventurers. Mr. Garway to be allowed three dollars per bag 
freight for the 100 bags of pepper shipped in the Mercury for 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 263 

Messina ; the 400 bags for Genoa are to be sent in the Victory. 
Messrs. Penwarden Rumsy, Thomas Thatcher, and John Brewer 
accepted as securities for mace. John Collyns, who has served the 
Company seven years as an apprentice in several ships and returned 
in the Mary, is given 5/. (| p.) 

A Court of Committees, July 8, 1642 (Court Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 186). 

Upon the petition of Jeremiah Sambrooke, representing his 
thirty-four years service and daily attendance with only small 
assistance, he is awarded 40/. The remonstrance of Sir Morris 
Abbott is read, concerning certain ' ballasse rubies ' and emeralds 
sent by him in 1621 with the consent of the Court of Committees 
to Surat. These, as he alleges and as it appears by letters from 
Mr. Rastall and Robert Younge, were sold to Asaph Channe, the 
Mogul's favourite, the price agreed upon being first 17,000 rupees, 
then 14,000 rupees, and finally 12,000 rupees, to procure the release 
of the President and Council and many of the Company's factors 
who were imprisoned at Surat for seizing some native junks in the 
Red Sea.^ Much dispute ensues ; but, as Mr. Younge, to whom 
the said jewels were delivered and who made the several contracts 
with Asaph Chann, is not present, nothing is determined, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees, July 13, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 187). 

A bill of 186/. \os. 3^., for casing bags of pepper sent to 
Leghorn, Genoa, and Messina, to be paid. Mr. Pryor presents the 
two policies for the pepper sent to Leghorn and Genoa, wherein 
the premium is to be 55^-. per hundred, 16,000/. to be insured in the 
Mercury, and 15,000/. in the Victory. He is offered 6/. \'^s. 4d., 
but refuses it as insufficient ; and the Court promises to reconsider 
his services when he shall have drawn up the policy for the pepper 
to be sent to Venice. (| /.) 

* See T/te English Factories in India, 1622-23, P- i?^; ^'so p. 33 of the 1624-39 
volume. 



264 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, July 15, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 188). 

Gerald, son of Sir William Russell, is admitted to the freedom of 
the Company by patrimony. The said Sir William Russell trans- 
fers to his said son Gerald the profits of 3,978/. \^s. ^d. in the 
Third Joint Stock, the principal of which is divided. The Deputy 
and Mr. William Corderoy are accepted as securities for pepper 
underwritten for by the former. As the business at present is 
small, it is agreed to hold only one court weekly, on Wednesdays. 
The Court consents to take Sir Morris Abbott's division in calicoes 
at the current price in satisfaction for his own and his son Edward's 
debt of 1,500/. An endeavour is made to settle the dispute between 
Mr. Keeling and the widow of James Jones about a debt of 273/., 
due by bill from Jones to Keeling as administrator to his son ; 
Keeling demands 20c/., but the Court offers him 100/., and desires 
an answer from him next Wednesday. {^\PP') 

A Court of Committees, July 20, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 189). 

Mr. Vincent to be allowed the impost on the Caesar s dust 
of pepper which he bought. Ralph, father and administrator of 
Thomas Keeling, one of the Company's factors deceased at Bantam, 
to be paid 120/. from the estate of the late James Jones in the 
Company's hands, in satisfaction for 273/. due by bill from Jones to 
Thomas Keeling, on the said Ralph giving a general release to 
Susan, widow and administratrix of Jones ; the widow to be given 
30/. towards her maintenance. Captain Mynors delivers an account 
of presents given to the commanders of the King's ships when 
he came home in the Discovery, amounting to 14/., and another 
of 12/. for what he gave to the Earl of Warwick and other com- 
manders of the King's ships on his arrival in the Downs in the 
Mary. The Court refuses to allow either ; but there being 
96/. 1 7 J. 9^. due to Mynors upon his account, it is agreed to make 
this sum up to ico/. in satisfaction of all his demands; his bond 
also is ordered to be cancelled. Resolution on the motion of 
Mr. Massingberd, concerning the interest of 8,000/. due from this 
Particular Voyage to the Old Stock, is deferred to a full meeting. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 265 

Mr. Massingberd presents a bill of exchange drawn upon Thomas 
Chamberlaine by Romulo RomuH Paulo del Sera, which Chamber- 
laine refuses to accept ; the Court orders that, if he does not 
underwrite the said bill by Friday, it must be protested. {^^ PP-) 

A Court of Committees, July 29, 1642 {Court Book, vol. 
xviii, p. 191). 

Mr. John Lloyd transfers to Mr. Jaques Oyles 300/. adventure 
and profits in the Third Joint Stock, the principal being taken out. 
Mrs. Mary Coggan, on the authority of her husband, Mr. Andrew 
Coggan, transfers to Mr. William Methwold 125/. adventure and 
profits in the same Stock, the principal being taken out ; and 
Mr. John Cooke transfers to Mr. John Massingberd 137/. 10s. in 
the same Stock with all profits, being ' old remaines ', the principal 
being divided. On a motion as to whether it would not be fitting 
to consider what is to be provided for dispatch to the Indies next 
year, Mr. Deputy replies that coral is ali-eady provided, but the 
principal thing to be thought of is shipping and how to raise 
a stock. He can suggest no better way than to persuade the 
adventurers in the Particular Voyage to bring in ten or twenty per 
cent, by way of supply to maintain the trade this year. The 
Committees think it would be better to raise a second Voyage, 
whereupon Mr. Deputy observes that, as the Governor and many 
others are absent, it will be well for all to consider this matter by 
the next court. It is then questioned whether Mr. Courteene is 
restrained by Parliament from sending out any more ships, there 
being a rumour that he is fitting out two. Some Committees think 
he has no such intentions, and that he will come into the Company 
as an adventurer. Mr. Wright is desired to confer with Mr. Cour- 
teene ' as from himselfe ' about this matter, and Sir Henry Vane is 
to be asked to stop Mr. Courteene if he has any such intentions, as 
the Court is of opinion that the parliamentary committee resolved 
absolutely to restrain him. (i| pp.) 

A Court of Committees, August 3, 1642 {Court Book,\o\. 
xviii, p. 193). 

George, son of the late William Walton, is admitted to the 
freedom of the Company by patrimony. Henry Fetherstone 
transfers to the said George Walton 500/. adventure and profits in 



266 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

the Particular Voyage. A letter is read from Seignor Jeronimo 
Willyamson Aschman of Middleborough ; and the Court, noting 
his services in posting and writing letters and advices, orders that 
a bill of exchange for 200 guilders be sent to him as an acknowledg- 
ment. Steevens presents an estimate of 90c/. for repair of the 
Mary, but resolution is deferred. After some dispute, it is resolved 
that the factors at Leghorn shall be told that the price of the 
pepper is left to their discretion, but that it must not be sold for 
less than twenty ducats, unless in a large quantity, when nineteen 
and a half may be accepted, (i^ //.) 

Report from the Commissioners of the Treasury to 
THE King, August 3, 1642 {Public Record Office : Dom. Chas. /, 
vol. ccccxci, No. 100). 

Upon signification of your pleasure, by your letter of June i, for 
the satisfying of the debts owing by your Majesty to the Com- 
missioners of the Customs, your late Farmers thereof, for which 
they together with other your servants stand engaged, including 
the debt for the pepper, which is 50,000/., we have sent you a list 
of all your parks, forests, and chases within England and Wales as 
directed ; but for the value of them we have forborne to give any 
opinion, not being able to do it but by way of estimate, which may 
be far different from the true value thereof. When you shall be 
pleased to direct which of these shall be disposed of, we will with 
all speed take order for the exact surveying and valuing of every 
particular, that they may be sold to your best advantage, (i />.) 

A Court of Committees, August 12, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 194). 

Motion is made on behalf of Daniel Harvey for the Company to 
receive into its cash 6,125/. ^^^d in exchange pay to the Guydaynes 
at Leghorn on the last day of next February 30,000 pieces of 
eight. As this is at the rate of 4^. 9^. \sic. ? 4^. 1^.] the rial, it is 
thought reasonable, and the Court orders a bill of exchange on the 
Company's factors at Leghorn to be given to Mr. Harvey for this 
amount. The alteration made at the last court in the price of the 
pepper sent to Leghorn is again considered ; and that commodity 
being solely in the hands of the Dutch (neither Portugal, Spain, 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 267 

France, or Denmark having any, and the Company only an incon- 
siderable quantity), it is resolved to advise the factors not to sell 
under twenty-two ducats until the progress of the Hollanders' sale 
is known, whereof they shall be informed weekly. The widow of 
Christopher Rix is ordered to pay freight on certain goods 
belonging to her late husband ; but her case having been recom- 
mended by the Lord Privy Seal, 10/. is to be returned to her on 
payment. Fotherby to be allowed an extra 20/. per annum to 
enable him to pay his servant's salary. William Garway and 
Robert Saynthill accepted as securities for pepper. The Mary to 
be repaired, and plank to be bought for that purpose. A proposal 
is made for a ship of 400 or 500 tons to be built, but the Court does 
not think the present a fitting time, as there are many ships of 
good burden in the river suitable for the Company's use, particu- 
larly the Love ; this ship Steevens is directed to examine, and also 
to inquire what timber and plank there is for sale and the price. 
James Bunce, executor to the late George Francklyn, transfers to 
John Massingberd 5,092/, \os. adventure in the Third Joint Stock 
with all profits, upon which 5,112/. i^s. id. is divided. William 
Willyamson Hoost transfers to Jaques Oyles 626/. lyj-. 6d. in the 
same Stock with all profits, upon which is divided 627/. ^s. Sd. 
William Newman to be paid 10/. upon account. Certain spices 
sent home in the Mary by Richard Swanne towards his mother's 
maintenance to be delivered to her, after they have been weighed 
and the freight charged to her son's account. (2^ pp) 

A Court of Committees, August 19, 1642 {Cotirt Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 197). 

Mr. Saynthill proposes that the Algernoon shall carry the pepper 
to Venice, touching first at Alicant, and the Court offers to pay 
him three dollars per bag ; he desires to be allowed to give his 
answer to-morrow. The beef returned in the Mary to be divided 
among the poor of Blackwall, if it is unserviceable for use in the 
harbour. {\ p.) 

A Court of Committees, August 25, 1642 (Cour^ Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 198). 

Mr. Governor reports that there are gentlemen (who desire to 
remain anonymous) who are willing to pay 16,000/. into the 



268 COURT MINUTES, ETC, OF THE 

Company's treasury here^ in order that they may receive its value 
at Leghorn in rials of eight at the rate of 4s. id. per rial at six 
months time ; this is agreed to and the money ordered to be 
received, and the Governor, Deputy, and Treasurer are desired to 
sign bills of exchange upon the factors at Leghorn for payment of 
the said rials at the rate mentioned. The Husband reporting that 
good cider may be had very reasonably, he is directed to buy 
twenty-five tuns for the Company's use. (^ p.) 

A Court of Committees, August 26, 1642 {Conri Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 199). 

Upon the request of Clement Mosse, who married the late 
Thomas Jesson's widow, the Court orders that no transfer is to be 
made of any part of Mr. Jesson's adventure without the knowledge 
of Mr. Mosse. John HoUoway transfers to John Abdy 1,100/. 
adventure in the Particular Voyage, all paid in, with all profits ; 
John Prettyman, administrator of the late John Farrington, transfers 
to James Oyles 200/. adventure, with all profits, in the same Voyage, 
all paid in ; and Mr. Prettyman also transfers to Mr. William 
Methwold 200/. adventure, with all profits, in the said Voyage, all 
paid in. Sir John Gayre and Captain Styles are desired to pro- 
vide materials for repairing the Mary, and Sir John is requested to 
assist the Captain in all business concerning the Yard at Blackwall. 
The general letters from Surat are read, and an estimate ordered to 
be made of the Company's estate in India and in England, and of 
all pepper sent to Leghorn, (i^ ^.) 

A Court of Committees, September 2, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 200). 

Mr. Ash well is allowed to receive one cwt. of rhubarb, sent to 
him by Mr. Merry. The present state of the Company's business 
in India is considered ; some think it advisable to send a ship of 
200 tons to the Coast, or in time to arrive at Bombay next August, 
with sufficient to pay the 35,000/. now owing at interest and enough 
to supply her own lading and that of the ships now in India, for 
which 120,000/. (it is thought) will be' little enough'. John Hayes, 
who served Milsoppe, the Company's late plumber, twenty-six 
years, is entertained in his place. On account of the great abuses 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 369 

caused by lading heavy goods brought home as private trade on 
the orlop, an order is to be inserted in the sea commissions that 
any one doing so shall forfeit his wages. A shed is ordered to be 
built in the garden of Crosby House, to receive part of the goods 
brought home in the William and London} Boatswain Ingram 
petitioning for some old masts and sixty foot of ground ^ at the 
south-east end of Blackwall Causey, Sir John Gayre and Captain 
Styles are desired to examine and report on these, {i^ pp.) 

A Court of Committees, September 9, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 201). 

Two Portuguese Jesuits, who came from India in the London, 
return thanks to the Court for ' faire respect and usage ' in the 
passage, and present a list of the goods they have with them ; 
these are ordered to be brought to the Company's house to be 
examined. Mr. Ivy also presents a list of his private trade brought 
home in the William^ among which there are three chests of figured 
satins and other stuffs ; these are also ordered to be brought to the 
Company's house for examination. Steevens reporting that James 
Shish has offered to sell the Company several sorts of plank. 
Sir John Gayre and Captain Styles are desired to view and buy it 
if it is serviceable and the price reasonable. Upon the petition of 
Jane, widow of the late Francis Chapman, whose adventure was 
made over in trust to Mr. Robert Freeman, it is ordered that the 
said adventure shall not be transferred nor any divisions delivered 
out upon it without Mrs. Chapman being first notified. On con- 
sideration of the great debt due to the Company for pepper sold to 
Lord Cottington and the damage thus sustained in India and in 
England, the Court resolves to put all the bonds in suit for recovery 
of the money ; and Mr. Governor and Mr. Deputy are desired to 
write to His Lordship and tell him this. Messrs. Sambrooke and 
Markham having drawn up an estimate of the Company's estate in 
India and at home, the Governor, the Deputy, and others arc 
entreated to meet and ' supervise 'it. (i p.) 

^ The exact date of ihe arrival of these two ships has not been traced. 
* ' To bnyld a house on ' {tiote in 7nargi)i). 



270 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, September 14, 1642 [Cotirt Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 203). 

Dr. Thomas Winston transfers to Mr. Robert Saynthill 710/. 
adventure and profits in the Third Joint Stock, the principal and 
ten per cent, being divided. The Governor states that Mr. Ivy has 
brought up his three chests of stuffs, which are estimated to be 
worth about 700/. or 800/.; and he having freely referred himself to 
the Court concerning freight, these stuffs have been ordered to be 
delivered to him. Ivy now presents a list of spices which he brought 
home, and desires they may be delivered to him, promising to leave 
1,600/. in the Company's hands for their freight until his return 
from the country ; whereupon the Court, not wishing to detain all, 
orders that some be delivered to him and resolves to consider the 
freight due upon them hereafter. Mr. Acton's bill of 2/. $s. for law 
charges to be paid. The Court, considering the great rent paid for 
Lady Clitherow's house and its small accommodation for want of 
warehouse room, decides that another house shall be looked for by 
next 'Allhallow-tide', when the year expires for the present one. 
No officer in the William or Loiidon to be paid until the Court's 
further order. (\\ pp.) 

A Court of Committees, September 16, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 204). 

The wife of Francis Cotton, minister in the Crispian \sic\ to 
be given 5/. on account of her husband's wages. William Hurt, 
late purser in the London, is called in and asked what broadcloth 
he took out for himself this last voyage ; he replies that he had 
two scarlet cloths, and that every man ' of any quality ' had some 
cloth. Being asked what goods were taken out of the London and 
conveyed ' into the light horsemen ', he replies that he only knows 
of some the master had. He desires leave to fetch several tokens 
from the cabin, directed to certain persons, which he wishes to 
deliver himself, but his request is denied and a letter ordered to be 
written to Mr. Spiller, either to send the said tokens or to bring 
them himself. The goods belonging to Thomas Ivy, for which he 
left money for freight, to be delivered to him. Gratuities of \os. 
each given to Thomas Barton, Giles Webb, Matthew Morgan, 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 271 

Thomas Peircy, Thomas Willson, James Straughan, Rowland 
Griffen, John Mannc, and Mawcoone [Malcolm ?] Macally, who 
were left at Penguin Island ^ by the Dutch for some pretended 
misdemeanour and found there by the William. Upon the petition 
of Edward Clopworthy, who was fined 10/. on the homeward 
voyage and ordered to pay the same to Hugh Cowley, boatswain's 
mate in the William, for scandalous and false speeches uttered 
against him, the said fine is, with Cowley's consent, reduced to 
5/- (I A) 

A Court of Committees, September 23, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 206). 

Messrs. Piggott, Hadley, and Chapleyne desire to know the 
price of the 105 bags of pepper they saw this morning, some 
of it being wet ; on this being fixed, they declare it to be too high, 
and so no sale is effected. Captain Styles presents Steevens's 
estimate of 61/. for repair of the ' eastermost ' great dock at Black- 
wall ; the repairs are ordered to be made forthwith, and the 
William and London to be brought with all convenient speed from 
Erith to Blackwall that it may be ascertained whether they will be 
serviceable for another voyage. Susan, widow of James Jones, 
who died in the Jewel, to be paid all money due unto her by bill of 
exchange at the rate made by the President and Council at Bantam, 
i. e. 6s. 8(^. the rial of eight. Two chests of rhubarb sent by Thomas 
Adler, a factor in Persia, to his brother John, to be delivered free of 
freight, the said Thomas having been ten years in the Company^s 
service and never sent anything home before. It is debated whether 
to send a ship not exceeding 200 tons to the Coast, but nothing is 
determined. John, son of John Harrison, admitted to the freedom 
of the Company by patrimony. Mrs. Dethicke at Blackwall to be 
paid .;/. granted to her by order of the Commissioners of Sewers of 
the county of Middlesex. On information of a rumour upon the 
Exchange concerning the great quantity of private trade brought 
home in the London and William, and that some of the Committees 
have a share in it, the Governor, Deputy, and all Committees 
present voluntarily take oath that they have no private trade 
in cither of the said ships, nor did they send out anything to 

^ In Table Bay. It is now called Robben Island. 



272 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

procure any. Mr. Methwold only desires to be excused, as he has 
something sent home in the London^ but as it is still in the Com- 
pany's warehouse he will give all particulars at the next court. 
Many of the officers are called in, and all take a like oath except 
Sambrooke, who being somewhat unwilling to do so is given until 
next Friday to consider. Three chests of goods belonging to 
William Hurt, late purser in the London, are brought into court) 
two containing his apparel and some quilts, the third ' sanowes ^ ', 
calicoes, ' duppers of tincall ^ or mirabolyns ', and wax ; the Court 
orders his apparel and quilts to be delivered to him, but the rest to 
be detained for further consideration. (2^ //.) 

A Court of Committees, September 30, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 208). 

Mr. Methwold presents particulars of the goods brought home on 
his account in the London ; these all appear to be necessaries for 
the household, and their cost was 1,310 ' mamoothaes ^', or 6^1. icy- 
sterling, ' and to this Mr. Methwold ofifred to bee deposed.' For 
the jewels seized in his house by Mr. Watkins, Mr. Methwold 
acknowledges there was a bag or two sealed up, consigned to him 
for delivery to some Portuguese merchants, but he professes not to 
know the contents, ' while they were opened in the Parlyament 
house.' One he delivered, according to direction, to Mr. Wakeman ; 
the other he was commanded by Parliament to deliver to the 
Custom-house. The Court is satisfied with this explanation, but 
thinks that some considerable freight should be paid for the said 
jewels. A court of sales is appointed to be held next Wednesday 
afternoon. Consideration had regarding the price to be put upon 
the pepper. As not more than 1000 bags are expected next year, 
and Mr. Courteene has not much, the Governor advises that it 
should not be sold under \%d. per lb. ; this is agreed to, but it 
is resolved first to see what the Dutch intend to do with theirs. 
Another 100 bags of pepper ordered to be cased, and sent with 
the 200 already provided for Venice. Thomas North, Robert 

^ Some kind of piece-goods, possibly identical with sanas, which are described as fine 
muslins procured at Balasore. 

^ Borax. 'Duppers' are leathern jars (Hind. ofaiJ^aA). 
^ Mahmudls : see p. 31 of the previous volume. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 273 

Jelly, and George Petty, carpenters in the London, to be paid their 
wages. The Court, understanding that rials of eight may be had 
at easy rates, desires Mr. Massingberd to buy as many as he thinks 
the Company will require. Messrs. Fownes, Yard, Utgar, and 
De Vischer desire to be paid the remainder of the money due for 
the John and Thomas sold to the Company last Christmas, with 
the interest due upon it ; they are told that this money was 
attached by Messrs. Utgar and De Vischer in the Company's 
hands, and with the consent of all left in its custody, but had they 
all agreed it could have been paid the next day, and therefore it is 
unreasonable to demand interest. On consideration of the debt at the 
Coast and the want of supplies for the southwards, it is generally 
agreed to send a ship to the Coast, and to instruct Steevens to look 
out for a suitable one of about 220 tons burden, and report to the 
Company next Wednesday. Sir John Gayre and Captain Styles 
are desired to provide beef and pork for two ships. Phoebe, mother 
of Edward Hemingway, to be paid two months of her son's wages 
yearly. Charles Slade (son of Captain Slade), who is a prisoner in 
Ludgate and in great want, is given los. from the poor-box. {1 pp.) 

A Court of Committees, October 5, 1642 [Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 210). 

Thomas Merry, the Company's Agent in Persia, having sent 
a chest of rhubarb in the London and consigned it for sale to 
Thomas Skynner, the latter now desires that the said rhubarb may 
be delivered to him, but the Court decides that it shall be sold with 
the Company's goods and the money retained until Mr. Merry 
returns to England. On the petitions of Thomas Becke, Alexander 
Homes, and John Mosse, three of those taken captive in the Gulf 
of Persia by the Malabars, the Court orders that such wages as are 
due unto them be paid, that Becke and Homes be excused the pay- 
ment of any part of their ransom, and that Mosse, who escaped 
without ransom, be given 5/. Joan Teddar to be paid all money 
due upon her husband's account. Mr. James Martin contracts for 
all the Company's ' chints ', at lis. gd. per piece at a year's time. 
Nicholas, son of John Bowater, is admitted to the freedom by 
patrimony. William Danvers, late steward in the William, to be 
paid 60/. in part of his wages, he being ill. (i /.) 

B.c.H. i: T 



374 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A General Court of Sales, October 5, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 211). 

Sale of ' quilts pintadoe ^ ', dust of dry pepper, mace, pepper, rice, 
sugar, cinnamon, gum-lac, cardamoms, myrrh, olibanum, aloes 
Socotrina, ' tapseels ^ ', cotton wool, cotton yarn, and Lahore indigo, 
with prices and names of purchasers. (2^ pp.) 

A Court of Committees, October 7, 1642 [Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 214). 

Certain Committees are desired to inspect the private trade 
brought home in the William and London at the Custom-house 
and grant what remission of freight they think fitting. Others are 
entreated to inquire for a ship of about 250 tons suitable for the 
Coast. Robert Saynthill offers to transport the pepper intended 
for Venice in his ship the Angela at 2^ dollars per bag freight, if it 
be landed at either Genoa or Leghorn, or at 3 dollars per bag if it 
be taken on to Venice ; he is willing to engage himself in 1000/. not 
to lade any contraband goods in the said ship, and to have her 
ready to sail by the 20th of November. This offer is accepted, and 
the 300 bags of pepper ordered to be consigned to Waltero and 
Isaac Vandervoort. Francis Tryon, Henry Box, and Thomas 
Allen accepted as securities for cardamom seed ; Penwarden Rumsey 
and Thomas Barrett for pepper ; John Hall and William Methwold 
for cinnamon ; Thomas CuUinge, John Heather, and William 
Tillsley for sugar and mace ; and Thomas Thatcher and Thomas 
Allen for myrrh, olibanum, and rice. Wednesday afternoon is 
appointed for sale of the pepper, silk, Cirques and Coromandel 
indigo ; but any wishing to treat for the said goods before may do 
so at a Court of Committees. A general court appointed to be 
held next Friday afternoon, (if//.) 

A Court of Committees, October 12, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 216), 

Mr. Ward, who married the widow of William Pearse, deceased 
at Jambi, to be allowed to take a copy of Pearse's account as 
returned from Bantam. Captain Herriott Washborne, Sir Nicholas 

* ' Painted' or ' spotted ' (Port, pintado). Quilts covered with chintz are intended. 
* Striped stuffs of silk and cotton. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 275 

Crispe, and Mr. George Henly accepted as securities for sugar, and 
Messrs, William Garway and Robert Saynthill for aloes and gum- 
lac. The dust of rich indigo not to be sold before Mr. Saynthill is 
informed. Mrs. Muschampe, widow of the Company's late Presi- 
dent, to be paid 150/., the remainder of 250/. bestowed upon her in 
charity at a general court. The price of the pepper, silk, and 
indigo to be sold this afternoon resolved upon. Isabel, widow 
of George Willshire, to have certain goods delivered to her on 
payment of 40j-. for freight, (i p.) 

A General Court of Sales, October 12, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii. p. 217). 

Sale of Coromandel and Sarkhej indigo, and of pepper, with 
prices and names of purchasers, (i p.) 

A Court of Committees, October 14, 1642 (Court Book, vol. 
xviii, p. 218). 

Henry Hickman and John Bodwyn accepted as securities for light 
pepper. After much debate as to the valuation to be set upon the 
Third Joint Stock, the Court thinks that twenty-five per cent, over 
and above what has been divided would be an ' indifferent ' valuation 
between buyer and seller, and that those ' that will goe off ' might 
either receive it in calicoes at two and a half for one, or money at 
three six months from Christmas, viz. at Midsummer, Christmas, and 
Midsummer year ; that any who pleases may adventure his said 
twenty-five per cent, in stock for the maintenance and prosecution 
of the trade, with what addition he likes, and pay in one-third at 
Christmas, another at Midsummer, and the remainder at Christmas 
year. This is thought to be the best way to maintain the trade, for 
if by this means 50,000/. could be added to the stock, it would ' doc 
the worke '. On a proposal being made for some encouragement to 
be procured from Parliament, it is replied that ' the distraction of 
the tymes hath hindred that, and that it is noe tyme nowc to trouble 
the Parlyament with busines of this nature '. With regard to the 
Dutch, it is the general opinion that if they see the English ' goe off 
and forsake ' the trade, they will make no satisfaction ; but if it is 
carried on briskly, then doubtless they will do so. It is next pro- 
posed that the adventurers in the Particular Voyage should unite 

T 2 



276 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

their stock to this valuation^ both being much alike ; but this^ it is 
rephed, they would never consent to do. The Governor is then 
desired to acquaint the generality this afternoon with the said valua- 
tion and the resolution taken upon it. Mr. Richard Middleton offers 
17.^. per lb. at four six months for forty bales of the Company's 
silk ; but the offer is declined as too low. Mr. Pryor to be paid 
25/. for two policies formerly drawn up by him, and for another to 
insure the pepper sent to Genoa, Leghorn, and Venice in the An^el, 
burden 350 tons, master, Thomas Perry. William Satterford, who 
has served the Company twenty-five years, and in his last voyage 
in the London was ' taken with the dead palsy and dumbe \ is granted 
admittance to the hospital at Blackwall with the customary allow- 
ance, and given los. from the poor-box. Rose, widow of Robert 
Fuller, who died in the Hart, to be paid all such estate as is due 
unto her, with the exception of 20/. which is to be kept for 
Elizabeth, Fuller's daughter, towards whose maintenance the Com- 
pany will allow 1QS. yearly out of the said sum. {}\ pp^ 

A General Court, October 14, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 220). 

The Governor reports that it has pleased God to send home three 
great ships this year, namely the Mary, William, and London, 
which have brought home most of their remains, though something 
is left behind, as well as a debt at interest. A great part of the 
Company's stock is in the warehouses, something is expected from the 
Dutch, and also from the King in payment for pepper. The debt 
in India must be paid, and there is ' a kinde of necessitie to followe 
the trade'. The better to enable the generality to judge, the 
accounts in India, Italy, and at home have been examined and the 
remains of the Third Joint Stock valued and estimated at twenty- 
five per cent., besides what has been divided, and when satisfaction 
is made by the Dutch then there may be twelve and a half per cent, 
more. The Committees propose that all who desire shall continue 
their adventures at that rate, or, if not, receive them in calicoes at 
two and a half for one, or in money at three six months from next 
Christmas ; that any may make what addition he pleases to his 
adventure and pay in at Christmas, Midsummer, and Christmas year. 
This will not only pay the debt in India but enable returns to be 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 277 

sent from thence, the country being quiet and the factors * sollide 
men ' ; and as soon as the distractions at home are settled, there is 
great hope and probability that some encouragement will be received 
from Parliament, the conditions demanded being so reasonable. The 
Governor further acquaints the generality that they may appoint 
three or four among themselves to examine the said account and 
valuation, with liberty to see any of the Company's books, letters, 
or accounts. It is also suggested that any free of the Company 
should be permitted to ' come in with new money, if hee please '. 
The Governor next observes that though there is a reasonable estate 
in India, yet stock is wanting to pay the debt and lade some of the 
ships now there and those to be sent ; the Committees cannot send 
any without the consent of the generality ; but if the latter will 
agree to waive their former resolution to end this Third Joint Stock, 
and give permission for as much money to be taken up at interest 
as will allow 80,000/. or 100,000/. to be sent out, they will derive 
much benefit. Money thus raised brought this Stock from 72/. (at 
which it was valued and sold within these four years) to 135/., which 
it now produces, though not all in money, besides what is expected 
from the Dutch. The more fresh money brought in, the less will 
have to be taken up at interest ; but it is impossible to do without 
the latter, as the Company buys everything for ready money and sells 
at two or three six months. Mr. Governor, by desire, then puts it to 
the question whether a committee shall be appointed by the genera- 
lity to examine the said account and valuation or whether they will 
rest satisfied with it as it is, when by unanimous consent it is agreed 
to accept it as it is. Mr. Governor's next proposal, that the Par- 
ticular Voyage and the Third Joint Stock should unite, is not 
approved. The Court taking into consideration what days to 
appoint to pay those giving up their adventures, it is thought that 
next Midsummer, Christmas, and Midsummer year will be fitting ; 
but resolution herein is deferred till this day sennight, when a 
preamble shall be ready for each adventurer to underwrite his deci- 
sion. The time for payment of new adventures, and additions to old 
is to be as follows : one-third part of the sum underwritten to be 
paid at Christmas, another third at Midsummer, and the remainder 
at Christmas year, the Company's aim being that no ship shall 
arrive in England or pass the Cape during the winter. Lastly; the 



278 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Governor acquaints the generality that with their consent the Com- 
mittees have provided coral which will arrive in time for dispatch 
in the spring ; that the Mary has been repaired, beef and pork pro- 
vided for two ships, and that it is hoped the generality will consent 
to a ship of about 250 tons being sent to the Coast with 10,000/. or 
15,000/. (3i/A) 

A Court of Committees, October 19, 1642 {Coiirt Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 223). 

William Sattcrford, who was granted admission to the Company's 
almshouse, not being able to manage without the assistance of his 
wife, and women not being admitted, the Court orders him to 
remain at home and to be given 2^-. 6d. a week in addition to his 
allowance as an almsman. Elizabeth Rolfe, alias Clarke, having 
taken out letters of administration for the estate of Henry Griffon, 
who died in the Haj't, the Court orders that none of the said estate 
shall be paid to her until next Christmas, when if it shall appear 
that Griffon has neither father, mother, brother or sister in the 
country she may receive it. The Company being somewhat stinted 
for warehouse room and cellars at Eady Clitherowe's house, the 
Deputy and others are desired to treat with Her Ladyship about 
this, as if it is decided to take another house six months' notice 
should be given ; they are also desired to confer with Sheriff 
Langham about Crosby House and to ascertain the yearly rental. 
On reading a letter from Mr. Fotherby to Sir John Gayre, the Court 
orders part of the wharf under the crane and at the stairs near the 
east dock at lilackwall to be repaired at once, the estimate for the 
work being 50/. ; also that the ' old meate ' be given to the poor. 
A man found stealing nails in the yard is to be absolutely dismissed, 
and there being some dispute between the porter, Giles Shepheard, 
and Fotherby, both are directed to ap[)ear at next Friday's court. 
It is also thought that some rules should be made for di.^tribution of 
the chips in the yard. Adam Lee, who came hoi.^ master's mate 
in the London, presents two * platts ' and a journal describing part 
of the island of St. Lawrence, for which many who are ' noe well- 
wishers to the Company ' have solicited him. The Court orders that 
Lee, for his own and other men's encouragement in this direction, 
be given 10/. on delivering up another set of the ' platts ' which he 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 279 

had kept for his own use. Captain Herriott Washborne and Messrs. 
Christopher Gore and Thomas Nicholls accepted as securities for 
sugar. William Svvanly given 5/. for piloting the London from 
Erith to Blackvvall. Steevens is directed to buy timber at yis. per 
load. Mr. Rilston to pay a bill of 2/. o^s. ^d. presented by Tench 
Younge. (2 //.) 

A Court of Committees, October 21, 1642 [Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 225). 

Pepper sold to James Stannyer for transportation at i6^d. per 
lb. at four six months, the Company to have the impost. The 
Treasurer and Mr. Massingberd are desired not to continue or take 
up any more money at interest at above seven per cent. The 
account of Thomas Keeling, amounting to 436/. 6s. lod., is con- 
sidered ; and, as Aaron Baker, President at Bantam, has a claim 
upon it of 250/., the Court directs that 186/. 6s. lod. be paid to 
Ralph Keeling, the father, and the remainder detained until the 
return of Mr. Baker, who is expected by the next ships ; and that 
meanwhile interest at the rate of seven per cent, be allowed on 
it. Sir John Gayre and Mr. Thomas Styles are desired to provide 
additional oxen and hogs. The Deputy and Mr. William Corderoy 
accepted as securities for pepper. The preamble is read, and Mr. 
Methwold requests permission to subscribe for 1,500/. on behalf of 
Mr. Fremlyn, and engages to see the same paid ; but the Court 
refers him to the general court to be held this afternoon, (i p.) 

A General Court, October 21, 1642 (Court Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 227). 

Mr. Governor observes that as some now here may not have been 
present at the last general court he will acquaint them with the 
business in hand, viz. that he with the Deputy and some of the 
Committees after careful examination have valued the remains of 
the Third Joint Stock at 25 per cent. This is 'a verie indifferent 
valluation ', the pepper and other goods being estimated at under 
rather than above their worth, and the hulls of the three ships valued 
at 1,000/. but thought to be worth 2,000/. If any man wishes to go 
out, he may, and he shall receive his valuation in three payments ; 
so also any wishing to add to his valuation may do so, paying in 
the said addition in three equal parts. This may be looked upon 



28o COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

as a new Voyage, and it is being started on as good terms as any 
he has known. The King's debt is ' vallued as it is worth, but it 
was for noe particuler man to warrant aniethinge '. If only a good 
stock can be obtained, endeavour shall be made to buy fine goods 
which will pay freight ; and if no man takes out his valuation, this 
may be done, for there is 105,000/. stock remaining when all debts 
are paid. If the adventurers will not furnish the money, it must be 
taken up at interest ; but in his opinion the former would be the 
better way. The said valuation being put to the question is unani- 
mously approved and confirmed. It is next resolved that the goods 
in the Jonah and Jewel shall accrue to the Old Stock.^ The pre- 
amble to the book of subscription is confirmed and ordered to be 
entered into a book for the adventurers to underwrite ; but the 
Court decides to defer a resolution on the penalty for non-payment 
of the additions to adventures on the three appointed days until after 
the time for the first payment at Christmas. Mr. Fremlyn's desire 
to adventure 1,500/. in this Voyage is allowed, Mr. Methwold 
undertaking to make good the payment of the said sum. (2//.) 

A Court of Committees, October 29, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 229). 

Mr. Rilston is directed to weigh the goods brought home as 
private trade by John Prowd, that his account may be settled. 
Mr. Governor suggests that one of the Committees be asked to go 
to Holland, with power to treat and to endeavour to obtain satis- 
faction from the Dutch for the wrongs they have done the 
Company, as he is given to understand that the money formerly 
offered by them ' is supposed to goe annother waie ', so that it will 
be difficult to get it. Thereupon Mr. Methwold again offers his 
services, provided that he is armed with sufficient instructions and 
power to conclude the business and with a recommendation from 
Parliament for his assistance. The Governor approves of this offer 
and thinks it may prove very advantageous in procuring satisfaction 
for what is past and be a means of settling the trade and obtaining 
a good agreement for the future ; therefore Mr. Methwold is 
thanked very heartily and it is unanimously agreed to commit 
this business to his care. A proposal is made that a letter should 
' Both of these vessels were as a matter of fact lost at sea (Sambrooke's account). 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 281 

be written to the ' Mayours ' ^, not to part with the money due for 
satisfaction without the Company's consent. On a suggestion 
being made that Mr. Methwold should start as quickly as possible, 
he replies that he can be ready in seven or eight days. It is next 
proposed that a protest be sent to the Mayors to the effect that if 
they part with any of the money due in satisfaction to the Company 
they shall be held liable for all damages and losses sustained ; and 
the Court, understanding that their [i. e. the Dutch] association 
ends next December year, thinks that some instrument should be 
drawn up and sent as soon as possible, demanding that the Mayors 
deposit so much estate in some good hands as may giv^e the 
Company satisfaction. This motion is well liked, but it is resolved 
to entreat Dr. Duck and Dr. Eden, with their proctor Mr. Budd, to 
meet the Governor and the Court to-morrow morning at nine 
o'clock to arrange the best mode of procedure. Ordered that the 
wives of the men who came from Bantam in the Jonah be paid 
what is due to their respective husbands for one month, (if pp^ 

A Court of Committees, November 2, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 231). 

Henry, son of Henry Polstead, admitted to the freedom of the 
Company by patrimony. Steevens reports that Messrs. Saynthill 
and Garway have inspected two prams, ^ one belonging to Mr. Law- 
rence, which draws eleven feet of water, the other to Mr. Boothes, 
which draws nine and a half feet when laden ; the Court being 
informed by Mr. Godfrey, late master of the William, that at the 
height of the spring-tide there is not above nine and a half feet of 
water to go over the bar at Jambi, decides to have nothing to do 
with Mr. Lawrence's ship but authorizes the purchase of the other, 
if suitable. A warrant is presented from the Lords Committees for 
the Safety of the Kingdom, directed to the Committee for the 
Militia of the City of London, about bringing all the Company's 
ordnance from Deptford to London. Mr. Fothcrby is ordered to 
deliver the said ordnance to the Committee for the Militia on 
demand, to keep an account of its weight and disposal, and to 
take a receipt from whoever shall come to demand it. Richard 

' The Directors of the Dutch East India Company. 

* A pram was a flat-bottomed boat used as a lighter (Dutch praam). 



282 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Swinglehurst to be paid 8/. iSs. for casing bags of pepper to be 
sent to Venice, Two instruments drawn up by Dr. Eden are read, 
one a protest to be presented against the Mayors in Holland con- 
cerning the satisfaction due for wrongs sustained by the Dutch 
East India Company, the other a letter of attorney to be given to 
the Committee authorized to treat about and settle this business. 
Dispute arises whether to send the protest first and then treat, or 
to desire some one to take the protest and, in the event of any 
difficulty in obtaining satisfaction, then to deliver it. On being put 
to the question it is generally agreed that some one shall be 
desired to go over and treat, and deliver the protest if he finds it 
necessary. Mr. Methwold is asked to undertake this, and willingly 
agrees, whereupon John Younge is directed to accompany him. 
The Court refuses Messrs. Garway and Saynthill's request that the 
Coromandel indigo received by them, for which they have given no 
security, may be taken into the Company's custody, they being at 
present ' restrayned of their liberty.' (i| //.) 

'A General Court of the Adventurers in the Per- 
TicuLER Voyage,' November 2, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii, 

Mr. Deputy intimates that they have met to give consent to 
a ship being sent to fetch the pepper remaining at Bantam for this 
Particular Voyage, sufficient stock having been dispatched there to 
provide 1,000 tons of pepper and there being only one vessel of 
200 tons to bring it home. It is computed by the Court of Com- 
mittees that there will be 600 tons of goods to be brought home, 
and that the Mary, lately returned to England, is a suitable ship 
to fetch these ; therefore Mr. Deputy desires that some of those 
now present will join with some of the said Committees and view 
the Mary, or some other ship, for this purpose. By general consent 
it is agreed to leave this business wholly to the care of the Court of 
Committees. {\ p.) 

A Court of Committees, November 4, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 234). 

Mr. Kerridge reports that yesterday he examined Mrs. Crad- 
dock's pram of 180 tons, four years old, and drawing 9^ feet of 
water ; he also went aboard a pram of 260 tons, six years old, 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 283 

which draws eleven feet of water; the price of the latter is 1,080/. 
and of the former 660/., and in his opinion the larger of the two 
would be the more suitable if it is intended to send to Masulipatam. 
Steevens is called in, and asked how long it would take to get the 
larger ship ready ; he replies three weeks or a month at the most. 
The Court, as it thinks of sending 5,000/. in stock to Masulipatam, 
decides on the larger vessel. A motion is made to send a small 
ship in January to the northwards, that may go to Bombay, and 
give the President and Council notice of the Company's resolves 
for this year ; as she will arrive two months before the other ships, 
she will greatly forward the Company's business. After some 
dispute it is agreed to buy both prams, and Mr. Jourden, who is 
acting for Mrs. Craddock, is called in and contracted with for the 
smaller of the two, called the Seaflower^ for 570/., and desired to 
say nothing about her purchase for three or four days. Mr. Burnell 
is then entreated to join with Mr. Kerridge in buying the larger 
vessel, and the Court orders that no repairs be made to either 
without the consent of Sir John Gayre, Captain Styles, and 
Mr. Kerridge. The Deputy proposes that the Mary be dispatched 
for Bantam, freighted by and on the account of the old Joint Stock. 
This is approved ; also that the adventurers in the Particular 
Voyage should freight 400 tons for their account in her, on the 
same conditions as the Ulysses was freighted, the old Joint Stock 
to have the remaining tonnage, and the demurrage to be the same 
as was agreed to for the Ulysses, the adventurers in the Particular 
Voyage to pay it if the ship is detained by their means, but if by 
the Third Joint Stock then the latter shall bear the charge. If the 
ship returns home with dead freight, each shall bear their propor- 
tion. It is also ordered that the Mary shall be dispatched from 
the Downs in February ; and Mr. Styles is directed to prepare the 
necessary cordage and cables, and the Husband to provide all other 
materials. On the motion of Mr. Richard Bateman, Mr. Fotherby 
is directed to deliver for the use of Parliament all carriages for 
ordnance that can be spared, to whomsoever Mr. Bateman shall 
direct, reserving only those belonging to the William and Mary 
and taking a receipt for payment of all damages and charges- 
Understanding that formerly 31b. was allowed for tare of every bag 
of pepper and that this was reduced to i\ lb. for all pepper returned 



284 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

in the Mary, William, and London, the Court, after some dispute, 
orders the former weight to be allowed. The Deputy and certain 
Committees are desired to meet the Governor next Monday- 
morning at 9 o'clock, to confer about the instructions to be given to 
Mr. Methwold concerning the satisfaction to be demanded from the 
Dutch. (2i //.) 

A Court of Committees, November 9, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol, xviii, p. 236). 

Upon perusing the policy of assurance for 4,000/. upon the coral 
laden at Leghorn in the Northumberland (master, Thomas Trench- 
feild), it appears that some have underwritten therein beyond the 
proportion of their adventure, with the result that some of the 
Committees who would have subscribed have been unable to do so. 
This occasioning much discontent, Mr. Deputy proposes that any 
who have underwritten should be permitted to vacate their sub- 
scriptions by crossing out their names. This is agreed to, and he 
and others do so ; whereupon a new policy is ordered to be drawn 
up, in which none shall be permitted to underwrite save with the 
permission and in the presence of the Court of Committees. The 
Court resolves to allot to the Mary 160 men and 32 pieces of 
ordnance, and to direct that not less than 120 men are to be 
returned in her. At present it is thought that 2,000/. in stock may 
be sent in her. It is also decided that the Seaflower shall carry 
thirty men and ten or more pieces of ordnance, and 7,000/. or 
8,000/. in stock. Mr. Burnell is desired to join with Captain Styles 
in providing cables and cordage, and to see that no bad hemp is 
used in making them, as the growth has been bad this year. The 
Court is informed that Mr. Woodall used to have the old chirurgery 
chests with their contents, for which he allowed the Company the 
price they cost, but now they are denied him ; he is called in and 
asked whether he did not ' new boyle the salves againe ' and so 
make the Company pay for them twice ; this he denies ' upon his 
reputacion,' but confesses that he used them at Christ's ^ Hospital to 
cure the poor. Hereupon he is granted permission to receive the 
chests as formerly ; but is told that, whereas the ships used to stay 

^ Probably an error for St. Bartholomew's, of which Woodall was surgeon from 1616 
till his death. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 285 

out thirty months and sometimes longer, now they will only be out 
about half that time, so he must proportion his surgery chests 
accordingly. The request of Thomas, son of the late John Millward, 
for the money due upon his father's adventure according to the 
late valuation of twenty-five per cent, and ten per cent, division of 
cloves upon rebate at eight per cent., is acceded to, provided the 
money can be paid with safety. Committees desired to provide 
wine for the ships to be dispeeded this year, and the said ships 
ordered to be victualled for fifteen months only. (3 //.) 

A Court of Committees, November ii, 1642 {Court Book^ 
vol. xviii, p. 238). 

Two letters drawn up by direction of the Governor and Com- 
mittees, who met at Gresham College last Wednesday, one to 
Sir William Boswell, the King's Agent at the Hague, the other to 
Mr. Whitaker, the Company's Agent at Amsterdam, concerning 
restitution from the Dutch, are read, approved, ordered to be fairly 
written, signed, and sent ; and the Court rescinds its former resolu- 
tion to send Mr. Methwold to Holland on this business. The 
policy for insuring the coral from Leghorn in the Northumberland 
is also read and approved, and 4,000/. worth ordered to be insured 
and underwritten for in court by those only who are adventurers in 
the present Voyage, none to underwrite for more than one-sixth of 
their adventure. The premium given by the two policies for the 
pepper sent to Leghorn and Genoa in the Mercury and Victory is 
ordered to be paid to those who insured, as intelligence has been 
received of the arrival of the ships and the landing of the pepper. 
The father of John Price, who died at Macassar, petitions as 
executor to receive his son's estate, which according to an account 
presented by Sambrooke is 660/. ; the Court, not knowing if any of 
this may rightly belong to the Company, orders 300/. to be detained 
until the ships come from Bantam, when if all is found to be satis- 
factory it shall be paid, with an allowance of interest at six per 
cent, for the time it shall have remained in the Company's keeping. 
Wednesday next is appointed for election of a commander for the 
Mary and of a master for the Seaflower. {\\ pp.) 



286 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, November i6, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 239). 

Handson, a grocer, formerly summoned to appear concerning 
certain goods taken from the London and William and privately 
landed, is ordered to pay 102/. 195-. for freight of the said goods ; 
he confesses that he received them, but desires to conceal the 
owners' names and freely submits to the censure of the Court, 
hoping that the sum named may be reduced, as he promises never 
to offend again. Abatement is refused, but payment is allowed to 
be deferred until Christmas. Captain Mynors is nominated first 
from those offering to go as commander in the Mary, but having in 
his last voyage in the said ship taken out four or five young men, 
left them in the Indies and received with some of them 50/. or 60/., 
he is questioned concerning this great abuse ; he confesses that he 
took out Richard Poyntell as his apprentice and received 50/. with 
him (he being shipped by Captain Kerridge), and that he was 
detained by Mr. Jefiferyes, President at Bantam, to assist him as 
a writer. Mynors also acknowledges that the son of Sir Thomas 
Dacres went out and returned with him (being shipped by Captain 
Styles at 65. 8^. per month), but with him he received nothing ; 
Sir John Harrison's son was also ' shipped in court ' to go in the 
Mary at the request of Sir John Wolstenholme, but he had no 
wages and has returned. Hereupon the Captain is desired to 
withdraw, and Messrs. Kerridge and Methwold are appointed to 
consider and draw up some instructions for the regulation of 
commanders and masters in this particular, and also for the 
prevention of excessive private trade. The choice of a master for 
the Mary is deferred until Wednesday, when these instructions 
may be ready, and then all officers shall be bound to observe and 
keep them. Adam Lee is chosen master of the Seaflower, bound 
for Surat and to touch at Mozambique, as he has been this way in 
the Blessing and in the Francis and presented several drafts to the 
Court ; he is to receive 6/. a month and to go from Mozambique to 
the coast of India and thence wherever the President and Council 
of Surat shall direct ; but as the Scaflower is not to return to 
England, Lee is promised that he shall not be kept in the country 
more than a year and a half. Twenty pipes of Canary ordered to 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 387 

be provided for the Seafloiver for merchandize, and ten pipes of 
Malaga to be distributed between the Mary, the Seqflower, a ship 
of 300 tons for the Coast, and one for Surat. It is resolved to 
settle with Mr. Prowd, late commander of the London^ and others 
concerning private trade at the next court, {p-^ pp') 

A Court of Committees, November 18, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 342). 

The petition of Thomas Ellwood, storekeeper at Sandwich, for 
an increase of salary is refused, but he is given a gratification of 
to/, and his bill of 3/. 16^-. 4,d. ordered to be paid. The Court, 
hearing that anchors fetch a good price at Surat, orders all those 
that are crooked to be straightened and sent, with what others can 
be spared, to be sold there. Captain Jourden's ship the Caesar^ 
Captain Steevens's Londoji, Captain Martyn's Mary, and the Tal- 
lant, lately returned from the West Indies and now in dock, are pro- 
posed as suitable to go to Surat ; whereupon certain Committees are 
entreated to examine these or any others fit for this purpose ; and 
Sir John Gayre and Captain Styles, with any others who please, 
are desired to go to Blackwall to-morrow and view the William, to 
see if she may not be made serviceable for Surat again, and to 
consider what alterations are necessary in the Seaflower. (i/.) 

A Court of Committees, November 23, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 343). 

Sir John Gayre reports that last Saturday he and other com- 
mittees viewed the Seaflower, and on the advice of several masters 
of ships and other experienced men ordered a slight deck, a fore- 
castle, and a beakhead to be made for her, which will not hinder 
her sailing and will help greatly for the accommodation of the men. 
They also ordered the Mary to be launched next spring-tide, and 
desired the seamen and carpenters to examine the William, and 
Steevens to report their opinions. Steevens appears and says that 
it would cost 1 ,400/. to make the William serviceable ; whereupon 
it is thought that she had better be sold or broken up rather 
than repaired, but determination herein is deferred. Steevens 
also reports that the price of Captain Martyn's ship is 5,000/. and 
that she is in a very bad condition ; therefore the Court resolves 



288 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

to have nothing to do with her or with the Tallant. The Caesar, 
the Mary (Roger Martyn, master), the Unicorn, the London, and the 
Peter and Afidrew are now proposed for Surat ; and it is resolved 
that when particulars are obtained they shall be examined, and 
the fittest for the Company's use selected. Ordered that 150 men 
be sent in the Mary, thirty-five in the Seajlower, forty-five in the 
ship for the Coast, and one hundred in the ship for Surat. Some 
Committees are desired to provide wine for the ships. A motion 
for liberty to be given to ' a friend ' to send wine by way of 
merchandize, giving a reasonable freight and paying the proceeds 
into the Company's cash at a fair rate, is negatived. Sir John 
Gayre and Captain Styles desired to provide more oxen and hogs. 
A sister of George Hopkins petitions for his estate, he having taken 
passage from Bantam for England in the Jewel and is supposed to 
have been lost in her ; two consultations and a letter from the 
President and Council at Bantam are read, and by these it appears 
that the said Hopkins wronged the Company in his accounts at 
Balasore, and for this he was ordered to make satisfaction in 
England, but for far more than the 50/. due unto him ; Sir George 
Whittmore having recommended this suit, the petitioner is told to 
acquaint him and her friends with this accusation and apply again 
next week. After much dispute it is resolved to consign the 
pepper shipped in the Angel to Messrs. Throckmorton and Collyer, 
&c., at Leghorn, and to direct them to sell it either there or at 
Genoa or Venice, wherever it will fetch the best price ; if sent to 
Genoa, it is to be consigned to Messrs. Wright and Hore, and if to 
Venice, to Waltero and Isaac Vandervort. Edward Kidden, baker, 
to be given 200/. on account, to provide bread, meal, &c., for the 
ships to be dispeeded this year. It being considered whom to 
appoint as master of the Mary, Captain Mynors is called in. 
He off"ers, if the freedom of the Company be bestowed upon him, 
to adventure 500/. in this Voyage, and (if the Court thinks fit) 
deposit another 500/., for which he will want 800/. on his return ; 
he will also be content to bear the adventure out and home of the 
said 500/. himself and to forfeit it and the desired proceeds if he 
indulges in private trade. Being an 'auncient servant', he is 
admitted to the freedom of the Company and sworn accordingly ; 
he then underwrites for 500/. in this Stock ; and the Court agrees 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 289 

to give him 750/. on return of the ship for the other 500^-5 on 
condition that if the ship does not return, or if he or any of his 
company shall indulge jointly in more than fifteen tons of private 
trade on the homeward voyage, he shall forfeit the same ; to all this 
he agrees. He is then appointed master of the Mary at a salary of 
10/, per month, and allowed two attendants, who are to be presented 
to and entertained by the Court and to return with him to England- 
Mr. Thomas Potter, minister, of St. John's College, Oxford, desiring 
to go as minister in the Mary, Mr. Deputy tells him that he will 
consult the Governor and let him know. (3^ pp.) 

A Court of Committees, November 25, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 246). 

The Court, understanding that some who have been accepted as 
security for goods bought of the Company have afterwards refused 
to sign the contract, orders John Spiller in future to see that 
all such contracts are signed before any goods are delivered, and 
Sambrooke is directed not to make out any warrants for delivery 
until this has been done. Mr. William Broadbent to pay freight 
for aloes, cinnamon, and gum-lac, part of his private trade ; the 
remainder to be delivered to him free. Hugh Cowley, boatswain 
in the William, allowed remission of freight on some part of his 
private trade, (i p.) 

A Court of Committees, November 29, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 247). 

The Court consents to the admission of Captain Goodlad to the 
freedom of the Company on payment of 5/., he wishing to under- 
write for 500/. in this Voyage. Mr. Methwold allowed to have 
forty bags of pepper for transport to Spain at i6^d. per lb. at four 
six months from the 1st instant, the Company to receive the impost ; 
and it is ordered that no more pepper shall be underwritten for, but 
all disposed of by the direction of the Court. Mr. Rich desires to 
know the price of the eighty-one bales of silk lately arrived, as 
a friend of his wishes to buy it ; the price is fixed at i^s. per lb. at 
two six months. Thomas Chambers chosen purser for the Mary, 
with Thomas Southerne as his mate, on condition that he returns 
in the said ship ; John Bourne chosen steward, with John Webb as 



290 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

his mate. Richard Fisher chosen purser of the Seaflower, and 
if his services are required he may be detained in the Indies as 
a factor ; the master of the ship to be joined in commission with 
him for the sale of the outward-bound merchandise. Henry, son 
of Sir Thomas Dacres, entertained as an attendant to Captain 
Mynors at 20^^. per month, to return in the ship he goes out by. 
All places being filled, Thomas Reynardson is appointed purser's 
mate to one of the next ships to be sent to the Coast or Surat. 
Consideration had as to what discharge the Company should have 
for the money to be paid in by rebate to Thomas Millward, on 
behalf of himself and the creditors of his late father, John Millward ; 
by Mr. Acton's advice, it is directed that Sheriff Langham, Messrs. 
William Cockayne, Humphrey Brown, and Thomas Millward, to 
whom the adventure of the said John Millward was formerly, on 
behalf of the creditors, assigned, shall give the Company a discharge 
for the same, and the rest of the creditors shall sign the release 
drawn up by Acton and then receive what is due to them ; in the 
meantime the money is to remain in the Company's hands. {}\PP^ 

A Court of Committees, December 2, 1642 {Couri Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 249). 

The Mary, designed for Bantam, ordered to be taken to Erith as 
soon as possible. Notwithstanding a former resolution to leave 
the disposal of the pepper shipped in the Angel to the discretion of 
the agents and factors at Leghorn, it is now resolved to consign it 
for sale to Waltero and Isacke Vandervort at Venice, that they 
may supply Italy on all occasions. Sambrooke is directed to cast 
up the rebate upon the adventure of the late John Millward at 
eight per cent, and to take in the usual allowance of two months. 
Messrs. Methwold and Bowen desired to go to Dover on the arrival 
of the N ortJmmberland and view the coral shipped in her from 
Leghorn, and arrange for its safe keeping at Dover or for its 
removal to London, whichever shall be thought best. The offer of 
Mr. Van Payne, the broker, to buy all the Company's silk at 
18^. per lb. at nine months, upon rebate from the ist of January 
next, is refused. A general court appointed to be held next 
Wednesday afternoon. Captain Nathaniel Goodlad is admitted to 
the freedom of the Company on payment of .5/., and underwrites for 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 391 

500/. in this Voyage. Thomas Ivy, lately returned from the Indies 
in the William, desires to be re-entertained either for the Coast or 
for Jambi, and promises to underwrite for 2,000/. in this Voyage. 
It is thought best to settle with him first concerning his last voyage ; 
and a list of the private trade he brought home and of the cloves 
he sent in the Mary being presented, they are computed to amount 
to about eight tons and their freight to about 200/., according 
to what the Company pays. Ivy alleges that the President pro- 
mised him a gratuity of 100/. for lading the William from Jambi ; 
therefore 100/. freight is remitted and he is ordered to pay the other 
100/. For his cloves he is allowed 3J. 4^. per lb. and for the dust 
at the same rate as the Company ; but he is to pay the custom and 
other charges, amounting to 139/. ^s. 8d. He is re-entertained for 
five years at 200/. per annum, to serve at the Coast or Jambi, 
where it is thought he may do good service by getting in bad 
debts. To enable him to become an adventurer, having served ten 
years in one voyage, he is admitted to the freedom of the Company 
by service, takes the accustomed oath, underwrites for 2,000/. and 
promises all faithful service. {2 pp.) 

A Court of Committees, December 7, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 251). 

The settlement made with Thomas Ivy at the last court and his 
re-entertainment are confirmed. Mr. Burnell reports that he and 
Steevens examined the Anne ; and that the owners at first asked 
only 1,100/., but the master now demands 1,150/. for the ship and 
50/. for his goodwill. Hereupon Mr. Burnell is desired to speak 
with the owners ' this Exchange ', and conclude for this or some 
other suitable ship. On consideration whether to buy or to freight 
the London, Captain Steevens, her master, and Captain Goodlad, 
one of her owners, are asked what freight per ton or per month they 
would demand, carrying one hundred men, or what consideration 
they would want for her hull, rigging, and all other necessaries 
if the Company were to man and victual her for sixteen or twenty- 
eight months. They desire time to consider, and the Court agrees 
to wait until Friday for their answer. {}\pp-) 



U 2 



293 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A General Court, December 7, 1642 {Court Book, vol. xviii; 
P- 352). 

Mr. Governor makes known that they have been called together 
to be told the result of the subscription now on foot. As yet there 
is but 40,000/. of the valuation of twenty-five per cent., with 15,000/. 
newly subscribed, so that apparently one-fourth of the adventurers 
have ignored the book for subscriptions ; and though it might 
be assumed that all who have not declared their intention of with- 
drawing intend to adventure their valuation, yet to avoid all cause 
of complaint they are now summoned to declare their resolutions, 
and also what course they think best to be taken to advance this 
Stock, as the charge must be maintained either by money adven- 
tured or taken up at interest, for the voyage cannot be proceeded 
with without material to work upon. It is agreed that ten days 
shall be allowed for all to declare their intentions, and any not 
doing so by then shall be absolutely excluded from adventuring 
' in this Fourth Joynt Stocke '. That all may know, a writing 
to this effect is ordered to be set up in several places upon the 
Exchange and in this house. It is also resolved to have another 
general court of the adventurers in this Fourth Joint Stock next 
Monday. {^\pp-) 

A Court of Committees, December 9, 1642 {Court Booh, 
vol. xviii, p. 254). 

Mr. Governor opines that, in regard of the great stock intended 
this year for Surat, it will be wise to dispeed two ships. Some of 
the Committees think that a ship of 250 tons and a larger one 
should be sent to carry the proposed stock of 80,000/., and for this 
two fly-boats have been offered ; one is thought suitable for the 
Coast, the other for Surat. After long dispute, it is put to the 
question and decided by erection of hands to buy one of the fly- 
boats, which, with the greater ship to be bought or freighted, it 
is thought will be sufficient for Surat, and the other for the Coast. 
Messrs. Burnell and Methwold are desired to buy both as cheaply 
as possible '■ at this Exchange '. A discussion follows concerning 
the freighting of a ship of about 300 or 400 tons for Surat, the 
stock as yet underwritten for being only 55,000/., and it is thought 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 293 

that if such a vessel were bought and sent out she with the other 
shipping would sink 20,000/. or 25,000/. of the stock. The Peter 
and Andrczu having been offered to the Company, resolution in 
this matter is deferred. Mr. Garway desires to know if the silk 
shipped in the Mercury at Messina is to be landed at Dover or 
taken to Holland ; if the latter he would ask for no freight, and in 
his opinion it will sell better there ; as the said ship is not expected 
for six weeks or two months, resolution herein is deferred. James 
BuncCj alderman, executor to the late George Francklyn, transfers 
1,000/. adventure in the First General Voyage with all profits 
in the following way, viz., 500/. to Henry Polstead, Senior, 300/. to 
Hugh Norris, and 200/. to Henry Polstead, Junior. {^\pp-) 

A Court of Committees, December 14, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 256). 

A valuation of the stores and provisions in the Peter and Andrew 
is ordered to be presented to the Court next Friday. Mr. Burnell 
reports that he and Mr. Methwold have bought the two fly-boats, 
one called the JoJin and Barb ary for 1,050/., the other, the Hope, 
for 1,000/. and that the masters desire to be paid ; as both boats 
with their stores and provisions have been delivered and are at 
Blackwall, payment is ordered to be made. Thomas Godfrey, 
late master in the Williani, is directed to pay 50/. freight for 
private trade, given 100 marks for bringing his ship direct to the 
Downs, and asked whether, if chosen master of the fly-boat designed 
for the Coast, he would put in any stock with the Company on the 
same conditions as Captain Mynors has. He desires time to con- 
sider ; and having served the Company thirty years he is made 
a free brother and appointed master of the fly-boat at 7/. per month, 
and desired to go to Blackwall and choose which of the two boats 
he prefers, that she may be fitted to accompany the Mary and the 
Seaflotver in January. William Bradbent, formerly master of the 
Crispian and Supply, is chosen, on the recommendation of the 
President and Council of Surat, master of the other fly-boat, at 
6/. per month, and admitted to the freedom of the Company by 
service ; he promises to declare at the next court what sum he will 
adventure. Other officers for the fly-boats to be chosen next Friday. 
Mr. Ivy is directed to take his passage in the Mary for Bantam ; 



394 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

and Mr. Woodall is desired to prepare a chest of chirurgery for 
Surat and one for Bantam, with a small chest for the Coast. 
Joseph Tyler, formerly an apprentice to William Tyler, is admitted 
to the freedom of the Company by service. On the motion of 
Mr. Essington, some remission of freight is allowed on sugar sent 
home in the Mary for sale by William Clutton, a factor at Bantam. 
The adventure of Edward Darling is ordered to be retained in the 
Company's hands and none of it disposed of without the consent of 
the Commissioners of Bankrupts. The 70/. due to Mrs. Cradocke 
for the Seaflower to be paid. The Court orders 10/. to be given as 
usual * against this blessed tyme of Christmas ' to the three hamlets 
of Poplar, Limehouse, and Ratclifife, and 10/. to be distributed 
among ' the poore East India widdowes '. The great damage sus- 
tained by the Company through men being permitted to let out 
money in the pursers' books, thus causing quantities of private 
trade to be brought home which otherwise would be avoided, 
is seriously considered, and it is ordered that if any man takes 
up more than one-third of his wages, the purser's book shall not be 
a sufficient voucher to the lender for recovery of his money ; and 
any purser allowing any man to take up more than this amount 
shall forfeit his own wages. Sambrooke is directed to observe 
these orders. William Harrison transfers to William Methwold 
his twenty-five per cent, valuation, 375/., upon 1,500/. adventure in 
the Third Joint Stock with all profits ; Benjamin Barron transfers 
to William Methwold his twenty- five per cent, valuation, (52/. icy., 
upon 250/. adventure in the Third Joint Stock with all profits ; and 
Richard Moorer transfers to William Methwold his twenty-five 
per cent, valuation, 100/., upon 400/. adventure in the same Stock 
with all profits. (4 pp) 

A Court of Committees, December 16, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 260). 

The Court agrees to pay Captain Nathaniel Goodlad 2,500/. for 
the ship Peter and Andrew. 1,200/. upon her delivery with all pro- 
visions and stores and a bill of sale duly sealed, the remaining 
1,300/ at Midsummer. William Hurt, formerly purser in the 
London, is questioned concerning his private trade, and a general 
letter returned in the London is read to him, in which complaint is 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 295 

made of the quantities of broadcloth taken out in the said ship 
and the Discovery^ to the great damage of the Company. Hurt 
confesses that he took out two broadcloths, some perpetuanoes, and 
some strong waters, but asserts that he was grieved to see so much 
cloth landed at Surat, that all men of any quality in the London 
had some, and that he was the first to tell President Fremlyn of 
this. Since arriving in England he has heard that Allison, master 
of the Discovery, Rockwell, one of his mates, and Thomas Falkoner, 
a boatswain in the same ship, had one hundred cloths between 
them. He confesses that on returning from his last voyage he sold 
120 calicoes to one Steward in Cornhill. The Court is not satisfied, 
as Hurt is charged with having many more ; therefore it is resolved 
that witnesses shall be examined upon oath, and a day appointed 
for his further answer. William Broadbent, who promised to 
adventure 100/. in this Stock, desires not to be kept to this but to 
be allowed to pay in 200/. to remain at interest in the Company's 
hands until his return or death ; this is agreed to, and the money 
ordered to be received and interest paid upon it at the rate of seven 
per cent. Nine culverins, eight demiculverins, and two sakers, all 
unserviceable, to be put aboard the Mary instead of ballast. 
{i\pp) 

A Court of Committees, December 19, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 262). 

John Hawkins, the Company's boatmaker, to be paid 15/. on 
account. Captain Bond, accompanied by three others, appears and 
states that, hearing that the Company means to complain con- 
cerning his intention to go to Madagascar, he has come to answer 
any objection, for he hopes this voyage may prove beneficial rather 
than hurtful to the Company. He is asked what ships have been 
provided, and replies one of about 300 tons, in which he intends to 
take about 250 men and forty women, fifty of the men to be sailors, 
the rest artificers of all sorts ; he also states that he has a patent 
under the great seal of England. He is desired to withdraw, and 
the Court after some debate concludes that this voyage may prove 
very prejudicial to the Company, for though apparently plantation 
only is intended, yet the principal aim is supposed to be robbery in 
the Red Sea. Besides, hitherto the Company's ships have been 



296 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

furnished at Madagascar with provisions at a cheap rate, but 
whether this will be so when Englishmen are seen fortifying on the 
island is to be questioned. It is also thought that the present 
adventurers will be much discouraged if Captain Bond is allowed 
to proceed, as it is remembered that for these reasons about three 
years ago the Company complained against the Earl of Arundel, 
who intended to dispeed a ship with Captain Bond in command on 
this same design, and also against the Earl of Southampton, who 
was preparing a ship to be sent to the island of Mauritius, but the 
King in the presence of nineteen of his Lords -stopped them both 
by an Order in Council dated December lo, 1639 (which is read) ; 
therefore the Court, not doubting but that Parliament will stop this 
present design, resolves to appeal to it for redress. Captain Bond 
and his three companions are recalled and acquainted with what 
has passed and with the Order in Council, also with the clause in 
the Company's charter which prohibits all men from going beyond 
' Cape Bone Esperanze ' ; notwithstanding all this, the Captain 
persists in his design and declares his intention to proceed, and the 
Court tells him plainly that it will oppose him to the best of its 
power. Edward Harrison chosen purser for the Peter andAjidrew, 
with Joseph Crosse as his mate ; Roger Artson chosen purser for 
the other ship bound for Surat, with Cassius Cole as his mate ; and 
John Dalton chosen purser for the ship bound for the Coast, with 
Goddard Saull as his mate. William Gurney, who has served 
Mr. Sambrooke in the counting-house five years, and Thomas 
Reynardson, who ' hath the Portugall language ' and is well recom- 
mended by Alderman Reynardson, entertained as under-factors for 
Surat. All goods belonging to William Hurt to be delivered to 
him, except the fifty-seven pieces of sanowes, which with his wages 
are to be detained for freight and other demands the Company has 
against him. Joyce Hopkins, sister of George Hopkins, to be paid 
20/. in full of her brother's wages and debts. (2| pp.) 

A General Court of the Adventurers in the Fourth 
Joint Stock, December 19, 1642 {Court Book,vo\. xviii, p. 265). 

The Governor reports that the subscriptions amount to 68,000/. ; 
that at the last court it was resolved that all who have not made 
known their intention to adventure their valuation of twenty-five 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 397 

per cent, in the Third Joint Stock are absolutely excluded from 
adventuring in this Fourth Joint Stock, and are to receive their 
valuations at the appointed times ; and that it was left to the 
discretion of the Court of Committees to allow any to receive it 
upon discount. These resolutions are confirmed. The Governor 
then intimates that, as the Stock is so small, if there is occasion to 
use 30,000/. or 40,000/. taken up at interest upon reasonable terms 
they may insure it ; that the ships to be employed on account of 
this Stock are bought, viz. the Peter and Andrew and three fly- 
boats, besides the Mary. Hereupon it is moved whether any man 
from this time shall be permitted to underwrite his valuation of 
twenty-five per cent, or for a fresh amount in the Fourth Joint 
Stock ; and after some dispute it is agreed to leave this to the 
discretion of the Court of Committees. The Governor states that 
there are many parcels of silk, cloves, and calicoes in the warehouses 
ready to be delivered, for which the Company will not be respon- 
sible. After the generality have left, the ship Peter and Andrew is 
re-named the Dolphin. (i| //.) 

A Court of Committees, December 23, 1642 [Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 26']). 

Messrs. Stone and Staresmore directed to pay the money they 
owe the Company for dust of cloves by next Lady Day, or means 
will be taken for its recovery. Thomas Godfrey acquaints the 
court that, as he has underwritten for 400/. in this Joint Stock, so 
he is willing to place another 400/. with the Company on receiving 
fifty per cent, according to a like agreement made with Captain 
Mynors; but as his ship is not likely to return, he desires to know 
when the 600/. will be due to him. After some consideration it is 
agreed to allow him the 600/. two months after the arrival at Frith 
of the Mary from Bantam, he to bear the adventure of his money 
out and home, and in case the ship does not return, then to bear the 
loss of his said money. Godfrey agrees to this and promises to 
forfeit the 400/. and its proceeds if he indulges in private trade. 
The Court orders that if the 600/. shall become due to him during 
his absence, he shall be allowed interest on it at the rate of seven 
per cent, for so long as it remains in the Company's keeping ; and 
as his voyage may be longer than is usual, an extra pipe of canary 



298 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

is to be put aboard his ship. An order of the House of Commons 
of the 2 1st instant is read, whereby the business in question between 
Captain Bond and the Company is referred to the Committee for 
Trade, of which Sir Henry Vane is in charge, and a meeting 
appointed for next Monday at 2 o'clock in the Exchequer Chamber. 
The Governor, the Deputy, and certain Committees are entreated 
to attend the parliamentary committee about this business. 
Anthony, son of the late Sir Christopher Clitherowe, Thomas 
Reynardson, and William Gurney are entertained as under-factors 
for India for five years at 20/. the first year, to be increased 10/. 
yearly until they receive 60/. James Whitehall, formerly appren- 
ticed to Thomas Burnell, is admitted to the freedom of the 
Company by service, and pays 20i-. to the poor-box. One hundred 
muskets and bandoleers for Bantam, and beef and pork to supply 
the ships there, to be sent in the Mary. Violet cloth, scarlets, 
stametts, and cordage of all sorts to be provided for the Coast. 
Thomas Handson reports that he has paid the money demanded 
for freight of the goods taken out of the Loudon and William ; he 
is offered 20/. to reveal the names of the owners but refuses. 
William Dalton is chosen steward for the Dolphin, bound for Surat, 
Thomas Whittington for the Hart, designed for the Coast, and 
Nicholas Houghton for the other ship for Surat. John Prowd 
granted remission of half the freight due on his private trade, and 
given one hundred marks for making the Downs his first port with 
the London and appointed master of the DolpJiin. He offers to ad- 
venture 400/. in this Stock, and is admitted to the freedom of the 
Company to enable him to do so, and asked what sum he will deposit 
at fifty per cent, on the conditions accepted by Captain Mynors ; 
he is allowed until the next court to give his answer. (4 //.) 

A Court of Committees, December 30, 1642 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 271). 

The beef and pork remaining to be put aboard the two ships 
bound for Surat in March. The Governor states that the Persian 
merchant who went in the last ship dispeeded to Surat sold some 
silk in London, which proving defective, he was arrested a day or 
two before his departure ; he asked the Governor to settle this, and 
the latter has now 41/. to the said merchant's credit, which he 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 299 

wishes to send to him. The Governor is desired to put the said 
money in the Treasury, and by a bill of exchange to the factors in 
India to charge them to pay the Persian. The ship designed for 
the Coast is named the Hart, and the one for Surat the Hind. 
The five bales of ' Orsoy ' silk in the Merciny to be sent to 
Amsterdam for sale. The petition of Katherine, widow of the late 
John Potter, concerning some money in the Company's hands due 
to John Skibbowe, is referred to several Committees. Plank 
ordered to be provided for Blackvvall. It is resolved that the 
adventurers in the Fourth Joint Stock shall be allowed to pay in 
their subscriptions beforehand and receive discount. Jaques Oyles 
to be sold pepper to send to Spain at i8<^. per lb. sifted, the 
Company to receive the impost. (i| pp.) 

A Court of Committees, January 4, 1643 (Court Boo^, vol. 
xviii, p. 273). 

Cordage to be sent to Bantam. The Court consents to waive the 
subscription of Lord Say, who underwrote his valuation of twenty- 
five per cent, in this Fourth Joint Stock, with an additional 8/. i^s. 
to make it up to 300/., and to pay him the money on rebate. 
Anthony, son of Henry Smith, who died recently in the Company's 
service, having been in India two years without receiving any wages, 
is granted a salary of 20/. per annum, to be raised 10/. yearly for 
five years, from the arrival of the DolpJiin at Surat. Thomas Ivy 
is permitted to take with him, to train for the Company's service, 
Martin Bradgatc, who is to be allowed 10/. a year for clothing. 
Mr. Ivy announces his intention to leave 700/. or 800/. in the 
Company's hands, on which it is resolved to allow him seven per 
cent, interest. The Court decides to appoint Mr. Pinson President 
at Bantam, at a salary of 300/., on the removal of Mr. Baker ; Ivy 
on his arrival to be next in council, and at the first opportunity to 
proceed to Jambi to recover such debts as are due to the Company; 
this being done, he is to go as Agent to the Coast, where until his 
arrival Francis Day is to be Agent, and Mr. Coggan, whose ' actions 
are not well rellished ', to be directed to return home ; but in case 
Mr. Day shall have left before the Hart arrives, or shall refuse to 
stay, then Thomas Pcnniston is to act as Agent until Ivy's arrival. 
Marmaduke Bludder is chosen steward of the Hind. Mr. Methwold 



300 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

reports that the Agent from the King of Portugal lately desired 
him to move the Court to nominate commissioners in India to join 
with some Portuguese representatives concerning the peace con- 
cluded by the Conde de Lynhares and himself, and to make 
additional terms about peace and other advantages, to be agreed to 
by both sides and allowed by the Kings of each nation ; hereupon 
Messrs. William Fremlyn, Francis Breton, Thomas Merry, Henry 
Bornefordj and William Thurston, or any two or more of them, are 
nominated to act as commissioners in this respect. A particular 
court is ordered to be held the first Monday in every month, at 
which Mr. Massingberd is directed to present a list of all who are 
indebted to the Company, that it may be considered how best to 
recover the money owing. (2| //.) 

A Court of Committees, January ii, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 276). 

Mr. Methwold states that with the consent of the general court 
he underwrote for 1,500/. by way of adventure in the Fourth Joint 
Stock for President Fremlyn ; that the mace sent home falls 500/. 
short of this subscription, and therefore he desires, on behalf of the 
said President, that the first payment of 500/. may be made from 
the salary due to him, and the remainder Mr. Methwold will make 
good himself As 1,600/. or 1,700/. is thought to be due to Mr. 
Fremlyn, the Court agrees. The difference between Elizabeth Rolfe, 
alias Clarke, Alexander Bath, and others concerning the estate 
of the late Henry Grifiin, who died in India, is deferred for deter- 
mination to next Midsummer. Certain Committees arc desired to 
order such reparations and alterations to the outward-bound ships 
as they think fitting, to fix the number of guns each ship is to carry, 
and to do all other things necessary for their speedy dispatch. 
Garbled pepper sold to Messrs. Piggott and Hadley for i8(^. per lb. 
at four six months. A list of the Company's factors in all parts of 
India is presented, and it is resolved that no more than those already 
entertained be sent out this year. William Gurney is directed to 
take his passage in the Mary for Bantam, to be there employed as 
the President and Council shall see fit, and Anthony Clitherowe and 
Thomas Reynardson to go in the Dolphin to Surat. Sir John Gayre 
and Captain Styles desired to expend 1,000/. on timber, as there is 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 301 

none in the Company's yard. At the request of Mr. Ivy, his wife is 
ordered to be paid 50/. yearly from his salary during his absence. 
{^pp) 

Bond given by the Company to Sir Peter Ricaut, 
January 17, 1643 {Home Miscellaneous, vol. xxxix, p. 164). 

By which the Company undertakes to pay to Sir Peter Ricaut, 
his heirs or assigns, 1,300/. in June next at its house in Leadenhall 
Street. {Two copies, one iti English and ojie in Latin. ^\pp-) 

A Court of Committees, January 18, 1643 {Court Book, vo\. 
xviii, p. 378). 

Mr. Hurt is directed to pay the imprest due to the Mary2XvA Sea- 
flower, and to give in an account of all wages paid, especially those 
of the seamen in the Mary, William, and London. Mr. Rilston is 
directed to give in an account of money received or detained by the 
Company for freight of private trade brought home in the said ships. 
Mr. Blunt to dehver the pepper bought by Messrs. Piggott and 
Hadley. Eight chests of money ordered to be shipped in the 
Mary, ten in the Hart, ten in the Seaflozver, forty in the Dolphin^ 
and twelve in the Hind. Dame Rachael Cambell and Sir Thomas 
Abdy, executors of the late Sir James Cambell, transfer to William 
Methwold, merchant, 3,300/. adventure in the Third Joint Stock, 
formerly the adventure of the late Jeffery Kirby ; Thomas Manwar- 
ing, executor to the late Henry Hodge, transfers to Thomas 
Princeps, merchant, 325/. adventure in the same Stock ; and 
Thomas Thornehill transfers to Jeremy Sambrooke 50/. adventure 
in the same Stock. In all three cases the principal and ten per 
cent, have been taken out. {^\pp-) 

A Court of Committees, January 23, 1643 {Conrt Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 279). 

Twelve small anchors to be made, six to be sent to Surat, four to 
Bantam, and two to the Coast. John Elyas, the Persian's son, 
having broken his thigh in Blackwall yard, Mr. Fotherby is directed 
to provide and pay for his diet and lodging. There being 254/. 15J. %d. 
due to the account of PMward Abbott, a factor who died in Persia, 



302 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

54/. 15^. id. is ordered to be paid to his mother as administratrix, 
and the remaining 200/. to be left in the Company's hands at seven 
per cent, interest. Mr. Clement to be paid 144/. I'js. 6d. for the 
freight of ninety-five chests of coral brought in the Northumberland 
from Leghorn, and 6d. per chest for primage. Henry Dacres, 
formerly entertained as attendant to Captain Mynors at 20^. per 
month, is appointed purser's second mate in the Mary at the same 
salary. (| p.) 

A Court of Committees, January 27, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 280). 

Dust of rich indigo sold to Captain John Brett at 4^^. ^d. per lb. 
at three six months. Captain Brett and Messrs. William and 
Stephen Boulton accepted as securities for it, and for rich indigo 
bought by Robert Saynthill to the value of 2,340/. 12s. Mr. Culling 
allowed 20/. in full of all damage in the sugar he bought lately of 
the Company. The Company's bill sealed for 150/. in the name of 
Margaret Lockett, spinster, to be vacated and a new bill for the 
same amount sealed by the Treasurer in the name and for the use 
of the widow of Hugh Lockett, lately deceased. Mr. Fotherby to 
buy guns for the Hart, with the advice of her master and gunner. 
William Gurney directed to take his passage in the Hart {or employ- 
ment at the Coast. {% p-) 

A Court of Committees, January 30, 1643 (Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 281). 

This day is appointed for hearing the complaints brought by Mr. 
Oulton against Thomas Ivy, some contained in a letter written by 
William Pearse, dated in Sadoe Road, October 24, 1639,^ and pre- 
tended to be directed to George Muschampe, others in certain 
articles, undated but signed by Oulton. Ivy and Oulton both 
appear in court. In the said letter (now read) Ivy is charged with 
having received certain presents from Mr. Fleming, and it is asserted 
that in ten weeks time there was a loss of 414 peculs in 1,268 peculs, 
37 cattees of pepper. The articles exhibited in India by Oulton are 
next read, and in these Ivy is said to have lent a parcel of pepper 

' O.C. 1717. The other document has not been traced. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 303 

to the Dutch in Jambi, with which he mixed dust and light and 
dirty pepper, by which means not only the parcel lent but the 
pepper remaining in the warehouse lay rotting, to the great loss and 
damage of the Company, and for this service he claimed twenty 
rials of eight ; to have caused the casting away of a ' bullies ' lading 
of pepper in Jambi river, by overcharging it to steal the customs ; 
to have caused a Chinaman to be entrusted with more than 500 rials 
of eight to enable him to pay 300 rials which he owed Ivy, thus 
putting the whole loss on the Company, for the Chinaman died 
insolvent ; to have lost 700 rials of eight when in charge of the 
warehouse by sending the Company's cloth (during Mr. Fleming's 
illness) to many places for his own private account. Being required 
to answer these charges, Ivy confesses that he bought a diamond 
ring of Mr. Fleming for 100 rials and sold it for ninety ; that he 
bought a set of gold buttons from Thomas Robinson, when he came 
from Macassar, but none from Mr. Fleming, and paid the latter 
twenty-five rials for a beaver hat. With regard to the lost pepper. 
Ivy asserts that, on his arrival at Jambi after Mr. Fleming's death, 
he caused the resident factors there to weigh the pepper found in 
the warehouse, which Messrs. Goldington and Nottinge did, and 
found there were only 2,065 peculs, as appears by their signatures 
to the said weight, which he produces. He declares that these and 
all the other objections have been laid to his charge in Bantam, that 
he had two discharges from Mr. Fleming, another from the Chief 
and Council in Jambi, and a letter from the President and Council 
at Bantam acquitting him ; but on these being examined, it is found 
that the discharges given by Mr. Fleming are dated in November, 
1634, and May, 1636, the one from Jambi in October, 1638, and 
from Bantam in March, 1638. After these and Mr. Pearse's letter 
have been read, the majority of the court are of opinion that the 
discharges are not enough to acquit Mr. Ivy, all being of an earlier 
date than Mr. Pearse's letter ; therefore he is advised to give a par- 
ticular account (as others have done) how he obtained his estate, as 
the loss of the pepper and the objections brought against him arc 
important matters. He replies that he borrowed money and let it 
out at five per cent, per month ; that, on coming from Masulipatam, 
he invested 2,000 rials in cloth, which yielded 4,000 rials at Macas- 
sar; that having served the Company ten years in India he has, 



304 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

by his salary and honest endeavours gained somewhat for himself. 
There not being a full court, resolution concerning Mr. Ivy is 
deferred to the next meeting. (2 //.) 

A Court of Committees, February t, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 283). 

Mr. Ivy is allowed to see some of the letters received from 
Bantam, in order to clear himself from the charges brought against 
him by Henry Oulton. He promises to answer the said charges 
this day week, and if he does not clear himself of all to forfeit his 
estate in the Company's hands. Mr. Biggs, from whom the 
Company holds some ground at Blackwall, reports that the rope- 
house there is much in want of repair, and that, if it is not quickly 
seen to, it will hinder him in building six houses which he has 
agreed to erect ; he is told that Mr. Bowen shall examine the rope- 
house and the Court's resolution be made known to him on Friday. 
Richard Hudson is refused entertainment, the Court resolving never 
to send him to the Indies again ; but, as he has served the Company 
twenty-nine years, he is promised consideration if he can find 
employment at home. Mr. Kerridge is desired to ship John 
Johnson as attendant to Captain Mynors, on condition that he 
returns with him, as he is his only servant for this voyage. Resolu- 
tion as to the dispute concerning the transfer of an adventure by 
Nicholas Skynner to Thomas Mead is deferred, (i^ //.) 

A Court of Committees, February 3, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 284). 

From a letter received this day from the Agent and Council at 
Spahan, by way of Aleppo, the Court is informed that Thomas 
Merry has gone to Surat, leaving debts to the value of 170 tomands, 
which for the present must be paid from the Company's cash ; it is 
therefore ordered that no part of his wages or estate be paid out 
without special direction. The Husband is directed to make 
provision for 180 men in the Mary for fifteen months, as 160 are 
not thought sufficient. Thomas Whittington, late steward in the 
Hart, having left the voyage, William Netlam, who formerly 
lived at Masulipatam as steward of the house and knows the 
Company's business there and th.e Portugal language, is elected in 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 305 

his place, and the Court promises that if there is need of a factor 
he shall be employed. Richard Hudson appointed to assist Rilston 
with the accounts of stores and provisions. Consideration had of 
the affairs of Benjamin Robinson, a factor lately returned from 
Surat, and passages from the letter of the President and Council 
there, with a remonstrance drawn up by Robinson in extenuation 
of the charges brought against him, are read ; after much debate, it 
is asked what estate Robinson has to satisfy bills, amounting to 
2,426/., which he gave for the Company's use at Surat, in satisfac- 
tion for the wrong and damage he did in buying 640 fardles of 
indigo without commission, and he is asked if he will give security 
for what he is justly indebted to the Company, and then the 
matter shall be referred to arbitration. The day being far spent, 
this business is referred for further consideration, (i^ //.) 

A Court of Committees, February 8, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 286). 

Nicholas Houghton chosen steward for the Mary in the place of 
John Bourne. Four bales of dirt found on sifting the indigo brought 
home in the London are ordered to be returned to Surat in the 
Dolphin, with directions to the President and Council to discover 
the perpetrators of this abuse and make them liable for this and all 
former damages of a like nature. A court of sales appointed to be 
held this day fortnight. The time for return of the impost on the 
cloves brought home in the Mary having expired, Mr. Blunt is 
directed to see that those returned in the William are delivered to 
the adventurers who have not taken out their divisions in this 
commodity, that they may have the benefit of the impost. Twenty 
hogshead of beef and pork to be sent in the Mary for Bantam. 
Nathaniel Kingsland's petition for 95/., due to him for wages but 
detained seven years ago on account of certain misdemeanours, is 
considered, and he being in prison the Court decides to pay his 
wages from the time he served the Company until his dismissal. 
Adam Lee, master of the Seafloiver, granted 10/. in full of wages 
due to him for John James, his servant, who ran away from the 
Blessing to the Portugals. Mr. Ivy presents his answer to the 
charges brought against him by Henry Oulton ; it appears that 

s.c.v. n X 



3o6 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

these have all been examined in India and he cleared by four 
Presidents and their Councils, as is proved by their letters now 
read. Ivy also furnishes an account of how he raised his estate, 
which gives some satisfaction. After debate the court agrees that 
he has cleared himself, and that he should be allowed to proceed on 
his appointed voyage. He is called in and told of this decision, and 
admonished to forbear all private trade and to endeavour to benefit 
and advance the Company's trade ; this he promises faithfully to 
perform. Thomas Nevitt and his wife Thomazine, administrators 
of the late Mary Evans, who was executrix to the late Adrian 
Evans, transfer to Thomas Princeps, merchant, 312/. los. adventure 
and profits in the Third Joint Stock, the principal being divided. 
Derrick Host transfers to Peter Van De Pitt, merchant, 200/. 
adventure and profits in the Fourth Joint Stock, and 400/. adventure 
and profits in the First General Voyage. Sir John Gayre and 
Captain Styles to agree with the bricklayer about the reparation of 
the ropehouse. Ordered that, if Mr. Pinson becomes President 
at Bantam, his salary shall be increased to 300/. per annum. 
Mr. Browne, who returned as master's mate in the London, to be 
paid his wages and receive his goods on payment of 30/. for freight. 
(24 //.) 

A Court of Committees, February 15, 1643 {Cotirt Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 289). 

Fifteen hundred bags of pepper to be shipped to Leghorn in the 
Love, William Ryder master. John Thompson to be given 6/. for 
going to Portsmouth and the Isle of Wight to inquire about 
a French ship lately put in there from the Red Sea. Fifty bags of 
pepper sold to Penwarden Rumsey, grocer, for transportation to 
Spain, at 18^. per lb. at twelve months' time from the 15th of 
March, the money to be discounted from then at eight per cent., 
the Company to have the impost. Rumsey tenders himself and 
William Webb as securities, but is desired to add a third. Mr. Meth- 
wold allowed thirty bags of pepper on the above terms. Mr. Mill- 
ward to be allowed seven per cent, interest for his 400/. remaining 
in the Company's hands. A dispute concerning silk bought by 
Messrs. Brumskill and Wallis from the widow of Alderman High- 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 307 

lord fs referred to the widow for settlement. Penwarden Rumsey, 
Tobias Lisle, and William Webb accepted as securities for pepper. 
(i| PP) 

A Court of Committees, February 21, 1643 [Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 290), 

The Deputy reports that yesterday, at the Exchange, Mr. Solomon 
Smith, Marshal of the Admiralty, showed him a warrant from the 
Committee of Parliament for the business of the Custom-house, of 
which Mr. Greene is chairman, for stay of the Mary until the money 
due for subsidy, etc., is paid.^ The Deputy desired Mr. Smith to 
serve this warrant himself, to let no one but Captain Mynors and 
the purser know of it, and to permit the said ship to proceed to the 
Hope and remain there until her release is obtained. This he con- 
sented to do, on condition that he should be saved harmless. By 
a letter now read from Captain Mynors it is seen that the Company 
is much beholden to Mr. Smith for having accomplished this so 
secretly, and it is thought that he deserves some reward. After 
some debate it is agreed that the Deputy shall consent to pay the 
subsidy to Parliament, so that the Mary may be released and 
proceed on her voyage. It is also resolved to bestow 100/. amongst 
some ' Parlyment men ' for friendly offices performed on this and 
other occasions. The court of sales appointed for next Thursday 
is deferred to Wednesday week, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees, February 27, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 291). 

Upon the motion of James Birkdell, chief master's mate in the 
Mary, it is ordered that he shall not be detained in the Indies but 
return home in the said ship. Mr. Peter Stoner, a Spanish merchant, 
accepted as security for Thomas Ivy ; and William Gurney as 
security for his son William, entertained as a factor for the Coast. 
(^ /•) 

^ On February i8 the House of Commons authorized the ' Committee of the Navy and 
Customs ' to detain the goods and ships of any merchants who were indebted to the late 
Commissioners of Customs. 



X 2 



3o8 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A General Court of Sales, March i, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 292). 

Sale of defective and Capiton silk, of Persia raw silk, Legee, 
ArdaSj Cannaree, and Mazandran silk ; of dust of Coromandel 
indigo, and of Lahore indigo ; of cinnamon and rhubarb ; of dust 
and ' skummings ' of pepper, light, stony, and mouldy pepper ; and 
of cotton wool ; with prices and names of purchasers. {\\ pp.) 

A Court of Committees, March 3, 1643 (Court Book, vol. 
xviii, p. 294). 

The Court resolves to send the remainder of the pepper to Italy 
and orders a general court to be summoned for next Wednesday 
afternoon, to obtain the consent of the adventurers in this Fourth 
Joint Stock. One hundred cloths to be provided by the 25th 
instant for Surat, one-third to be greens, the rest reds and stametts. 
Messrs. Ashwell and Bateman entreated to examine and report on 
the account of William Pearse, who died at Jambi. John Langley 
and Richard Middleton accepted as securities for silk, and Thomas 
Thatcher and Thomas Mathews for pepper. Mr. Massingberd 
presents particulars of bills due to the Company over six months, 
and the Court orders that all who are or shall be indebted to the 
Company over three months shall be sued by John Spiller without 
his first acquainting the Court. Spiller is directed to inform the 
Court every fortnight of those who refuse to pay money owing for 
two months. He is also desired to call upon Mr. Gearing's securities 
for payment of the two bills, amounting to 418/. y. Sd., and if this 
is refused to put the bills in suit. Sambrooke is directed to clear 
Mr. Gearing's two smaller bills by such divisions as are due unto 
him. There being still some goods belonging to several adven- 
turers upon their divisions in the Company's warehouses, the ware- 
house-keepers are ordered to call upon each adventurer to take out 
those belonging to him, and on any refusing to do so his goods are 
to be weighed and put aside for him, and the same charged to his 
account. (i| //.) 

A Court of Committees, March 8, 1643 {Court Book, vol. 
xviii, p. 295). 

The Court taking into consideration the many inconveniencies 
which arise from buying ships, resolves to have two built for the 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 309 

Company and to direct Steevens to begin one of about 500 tons at 
once, leaving it to his discretion to increase or lessen her burden 
by forty or fifty tons. Richard Davies and Samuel Manning 
accepted as securities for silk bought by Henry Rapyer. Mr. Meth- 
wold permitted to send twelve yards of scarlet and a piece of 
' Scarlett bayes ' as a present to the ' Vendore De Fazendo of Goa ' \ 
an iron chest from Nuremberg as a present to Virge Vorah ^ at 
Surat, and, by way of adventure, two suits of gilded leather, worth 
here about 100/., the proceeds of the latter to be paid into the 
Company's cash at Surat and Mr. Methwold to be allowed ^s. the 
rial of eight in England ; he is to pay 10/. for freight, but if the suits 
do not bring him in considerable profit this sum is to be remitted. 
A letter of attorney is read from Ralph Hough, one of the creditors 
of Edward Darling, ' silkeman,' who lately became bankrupt ; 
whereupon Mr. Deputy is directed to receive all divisions that are 
or shall become due on the said Darling's adventure, on behalf of 
his creditors. Davies to be paid 6/. for piloting the Mary from 
Blackwall to Gravesend and thence to the Downs, 2/. for the Sea- 
flower^ and 7/. for the Hart, (i /.) 

A General Court of the Adventurers in the Fourth 
Joint Stock, March 8, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xviii, p. 296). 

Mr. Deputy observes that the cause of this meeting is that the 
generality may be acquainted with the proposed export of pepper, 
cloveS; indigo, and some calicoes if necessary ; also with the 
proposition made by the Committee of Parliament for the Safety of 
the Kingdom for the loan of some of the Company's ordnance 
to fortify the bulwarks now being erected for security of the City ; 
and concerning some course to be taken about delivery of goods 
belonging to adventurers, which crowd the Company's warehouses 
and hinder the sale and disposal of goods. It is agreed by erection 
of hands that the shipping of pepper, etc., be left to the discretion 
of the Committees, provided that assurance is made to the value of 

' The Vedor da f agenda at Cjoa had cliarge of the finances, and was next in rank to the 
Viceroy (see Mr. Gray's Pyrard de Laval, vol. ii, pp. 21, 40). For his friendly treatment 
of Methwold and his companions sec Mandelslo's Travels, p. 98. 

^ Virj! Vora, a wealthy native merchant whose name continually occurs in the Surat 
records. 



310 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

one-half or three-fourths of what is dispatched, and underwritten 
for first by the adventurers if they so wish. Concerning the 
ordnance, the Deputy relates that yesterday he received a warrant 
to appear before the Committee of Parliament for the Safety of the 
Kingdom, who desired to borrow some of the Company's ordnance 
for securing the fortifications now being erected for defence of the 
City, as the Tower cannot furnish as many as are necessary ; 
he told them that he could not grant their request, but that he 
would inform the generality of it ; and having now done so, he 
desires them to consider and resolve on this matter. Hereupon 
some allege that they are acting in trust for many widows and 
orphans, and are much indebted at interest ; that the Company has 
need of some of the ordnance, and the remainder, if sold, will yield 
a considerable sum, which would help to pay off part of the large 
debt ; and further that each man present pays something towards 
building the said fortifications. Mr. Deputy is desired to put it to 
the question, which he does, and it is unanimously decided not 
to lend any ordnance. Finally, the Deputy calls attention to the 
refusal of adventurers to take away from the Company's warehouses 
the goods due to them upon their several divisions. The orders 
already made at two general courts are read and confirmed, and it 
is further resolved that, in case of any disaster happening to the said 
goods, the loss shall not be borne by the general company but 
by each individual adventurer owning the goods. (2 //.) 

A Court of Committees, March 10, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 298). 

A letter from four of the Parliamentary Committee for the 
Safety of the Kingdom is read, in which the Company is desired to 
spare some of its ordnance for the defence of the City, as the Tower 
cannot furnish as many as are needful ; Messrs. Kendricke, Chris- 
topher Packe, and William Nowell ^ appear to receive the Court's 
answer ; they are told that this matter was fully considered at the 
last general court, when it was unanimously agreed, for reasons 

' The first of these was no doubt John Kendrick, who was elected an alderman in May, 
1643, and Lord Mayor in 1651-52. Pack is well known; he was a strong partisan 
of Cromwell, was knighted by him in 1655, and was called to the Upper House in 1657, 
under the title of Lord Pack. William Nowell has not been traced. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 31 1 

then stated, not to lend the Company's ordnance, and this Court 
has no power to rescind that order ; but, if the Committee is 
willing to buy any of the guns, they shall be sold as cheaply as 
any. James and Anthony, sons of the late Sir Christopher Clitherowe, 
are admitted to the freedom of the Company by patrimony and 
take the customary oath. Captain Goodlad appears about the 
defective guns and want of powder in the ship Peter and Andreiv 
he sold to the Company. Mr. Deputy proposes that the Captain 
shall choose one gunner, and the Company another, to try the guns. 
Goodlad says that on his return from Chatham he will have the 
guns examined ; while, as for the powder, if he does not deliver the 
twenty-two barrels before to-morrow, the Company can buy that 
quantity and he will allow for it. It is resolved to export 1,400 or 
1,500 bags of pepper, 100 hogsheads of cloves, and 300 barrels 
of indigo, to give two and a half dollars freight for each bag of 
pepper, three dollars for each barrel of indigo, and four for each 
hogshead of cloves. William Ryder, master of the Love, is agreed 
with to carry 400 or 500 bags of pepper and 30 or 40 hhds. of 
cloves at this rate to Genoa and Leghorn, on condition that he 
touches at no other port by the way and carries no prohibited goods. 
Many other masters present themselves and offer to carry the 
remaining goods, but the Mercury (Thomas Harris, master) and 
the Unicorn (Edward Johnson, master) are chosen for this service. 
An agreement is made with Mr, William Garway, owner of the 
Meren.ry (which ship is at present in Holland, but expected home 
daily) for her to come up to Tilbury and there ship the better half 
of the goods remaining (after the Love is laden) and proceed to 
Marseilles and there unlade the indigo, then go on to Leghorn and 
Messina and unlade the pepper and cloves ; Mr. Garway promises 
that his said ship shall not touch at any other port or carry any 
prohibited goods, and if she is not ready to depart with the Love^ 
that then she shall wait and accompany the Unicorji. An agree- 
ment is made with Mr. Deputy to have the Unicorn ready in forty 
days to carry the remaining goods on the same conditions for Italy, 
and to accompany the Mercury if the latter does not go with the 
Love. Consideration had as to whom to consign the goods to 
be sent to Leghorn ; but resolution herein is deferred. Resolved 
that two-thirds of the pepper, cloves, and indigo now being dis- 



312 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

patched shall be insured, and that 200 bags of the pepper shipped 
in the Love shall be landed at Genoa and 200 bags at Leghorn. 
Motion made to insure some part of the Company's estate sent to 
and returned from India, but no resolution is come to. A letter 
directed to Mr. Deputy from Holland, concerning the composing 
of the differences between the two East India Companies, is read, 
and after some debate Mr. Deputy is desired to reply to his friend 
that if the Dutch will make good their former offer of 500,000 
guilders in compensation of all wrongs, ' without relinquishing their 
[i. e. the English Company's] right to Pollaroone ' [Pulo Run], 
some one shall be sent over to treat with them. The offer of 
Jaques Oyles to buy cloves for o^s. ()d. per lb. at three six months 
is refused, the Court hoping to get a much better price. (3//.) 

A Court of Committees, March 15, 1643 {Court Book. 
vol. xviii, p. 301). 

Resolved that the pepper, cloves, and indigo intended for Leg- 
horn shall be consigned to Messrs. Job Throgmorton, John Collyer, 
Daniel Oxenbridge, Nicholas Abdy, and Philip Willyams, Thomas 
Jennings and Gilbert Keate accepted as securities for the remainder 
of the indigo bought by Robert Saynthill, Mr. Woodall to be 
given 100/. (besides the 150/. he has already received) by way 
of imprest on his account for chirurgery provided for the five ships 
intended for India. The defective calicoes not to be disposed 
of until the ships for Surat have been dispatched. Ordered that 
Mr. Holloway and all adventurers who have not received their 
divisions of calicoes shall have tickets sent to them to fetch them 
away, and if they refuse to do so, Mr. Bowen is directed to dispatch 
to each adventurer his division. (|/.) 

A Court of Committees, March 17, 1643 [Court Book, 
vol, xviii, p. 302). 

Ordered that the 200 bags of pepper shipped in the Love be 
landed at Genoa ; also thirty hogsheads of cloves, if a market can 
be found for them, but if not, the cloves to be sent to Leghorn with 
the remainder of the pepper. Abraham Chamberlaine to receive 
(as sole surviving executor) all divisions due upon the adventure of 
the late Nicholas Askwith, upon he and his brother. Captain 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 313 

Thomas Chamberlaine, entering into a bond of 600/. to save the 
Company harmless, there being a suit now in Chancery between 
some of the legatees and Mr. Chamberlaine, and the said divisions 
by that court ordered to remain in the Company's hands. Upon 
a motion made on behalf of John Spiller, a factor in India, the 
Court orders that, if the President and Council approve, he shall be 
given an increase in wages not exceeding one hundred nobles 
yearly, from the expiration of his former covenant, next Lady Day 
twelvemonth. (| /.) 

A Court of Committees, March 22, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 303). 

The Court is informed that Houghton, the brewer, sent twenty 
tons of beer to the Downs to be distributed between the Mary, 
Hart^BX\d Seaflower^ but the hoy running aboard the Mary, her 
master, Captain Mynors, took it all and refused to give any to the 
other ships, though he already had five tons from the King's ship ; 
this is ordered to be entered in the Black Book, that the Captain 
may be questioned concerning it on his return. Mr. Willson 
reports that Captain Carleton and his mother, who are indebted 
to the Company, desire forbearance for a month or two, or that the 
Court will accept bills for the amount on money due to them in the 
country ; no resolution is come to. Steevens is ordered to set about 
building a ship of 300 tons forthwith. A note is read from the 
committee for letting the lands and tenements belonging to Sir 
Thomas Gresham, in which some of the Company are desired 
to appear at the Lord Mayor's house to-morrow at two o'clock, 
about taking the lease of the cellar under the Exchange ; certain 
Committees are entreated to attend and endeavour to obtain the 
said lease at a reasonable rate, or, if not able to do this, then to ask 
for two years' time to procure other premises. At the request 
of Valentine Markham, the salary of his son Thomas, a factor 
at Surat, is raised 10/. yearly for five years, to begin from the 
arrival of the Dolphin, if the President and Council approve. 
Mr. Farrer complains that Richard Fisher, purser in the Seajioiver, 
promised to take his son to the Indies, but sent him ashore at the 
Downs, and only took his adventure of five quarter-casks of wine ; 
Farrer also asserts that Fisher took an adventure of his own to the 



314 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

value of 400/,, and promises to give particulars of it. He is told 
that Fisher was right to put his son ashore, as he had no power to 
take him ; but for promising to do so, and for taking the wine, he 
shall be questioned, and it shall be mentioned in the Surat letter 
now going by the Dolphin. John Martyn, a labourer, whose skull 
was broken aboard the Hvid by the fall of a mallet, is given 10s. 
from the poor-box. (2 pp.) 

A Court of Committees, March 24, 1643 (Couri Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 305). 

Mr. Willson reports that he and Mr. Ash well waited yesterday 
on the Lord Mayor and the committee for letting Sir Thomas 
Gresham's lands, and agreed with them for a lease of the Exchange 
cellar for thirty-one years from next Lady Day, at 50/. a year and 
a fine of 100/. ; this is approved and the Committees are thanked. 
Mr. Deputy moves for a policy of assurance to be made for some 
of the Company's estate to and from India, because there is now 
being sent out 50,000/. more than there is in the kingdom to satisfy 
the Company's debts ; this is referred to the next meeting. The 
Court, taking into consideration the disturbances of the times, thinks 
fit to procure a man-of-war to convoy the Dolphin and Hind twenty 
leagues beyond Scilly, and certain Committees are chosen to repair 
(on hearing of the arrival of the said ships in the Downs) to the 
Earl of Warwick, and procure a letter from him to Captain Batten 
for the desired convoy. Meanwhile Mr. Younge is directed to go 
to the Downs and make a ' consortshippe ' with some ship or ships 
bound for the southwards, and on a fair wind, without awaiting 
further advice, to dispeed the Company's ships if only there is one 
other ship to accompany them, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees, March 28, 1643 {Convt Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 306). 

Richard Hudson to be paid 8/. for his services in unlading the 
Mary and London. Messrs. Huttly and Mullyns present an order 
from the House of Commons of the 25th instant^ requiring the 
Company to lend as many of its guns as can be spared to help 
fortify the bulwarks in erection for defence of the City ; they are 

' This should be the 24th (see Cotnmons' Journal, vol. iii, p. 16). 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 315 

told that a former similar request was made known at a general 
court and refused by the generality : that this Court has no power 
to go against that decision and therefore cannot lend the guns : 
and for further satisfaction the answer given to Mr. Kendricke and 
others on the loth instant is read. On consideration that 50,000/. 
more than there is in the kingdom to pay the Company's debts 
is being sent out, and that there is besides a debt at Surat, the 
Court orders two policies to be at once drawn up, one to insure 
30,000/. of the 70,000/. quick stock now being sent in the Dolphin, 
Hind, and Seaflower to Surat, to enable the debt there to be paid 
in case of loss ; the other to insure 70,000/. belonging to the 
[Fourth] Joint Stock being safely landed at the port of London 
at the rate of \os. the dollar, either in the Discovery, Reformation, 
Ulysses, Mary, or DolpJiin, upon all goods laden in them between 
the 29th of last September and the 31st of March, 1644. The 
policy for the pepper and cloves shipped in the Love ordered to be 
drawn up for 7,000/., and underwritten for first by the Committees, 
and if they refuse then by the other adventurers, (i p.) 

A Court of Committees, April 7, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 308). 

A warrant signed for payment of 100/. to Mr. Black well, the 
King's grocer, for composition of spices for the last quarter. On 
consideration whether this allowance is due, as he no longer supplies 
His Majesty with spices, the Court orders that it shall not be given 
again without especial order. Captain Washborne is summoned 
to appear about two bills for 418/. 35-. 8^., due long since, for which 
he and Mr. Allen stand bound with Mr. Gearing, and about his 
own debt of 421/. 35-. id., for which he has given no security ; he 
promises that, if Mr. Gearing does not clear his bills by Mid- 
summer, he and Mr. Allen will pay them ; he also undertakes 
to pay one-third of his own debt at once and discount for the 
remainder shortly. A letter is read from William Cobb, who 
is a prisoner at Rochester at the Company's suit, about the piracy 
committed in the Red Sea ; it is resolved to prosecute him in the 
Admiralty, and a warrant is ordered to be taken out against 
Kynaston and Ayres on the same count. The William ordered 
to be broken up in Blackwall dock, and Fotherby to keep an 



3i6 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

account of the cost ; also of all her materials and iron sold or used 
in building the new ships, according to the order of Sir John 
Gayre and Captain Styles. A bill ordered to be set up at the 
Exchange notifying that the Londo7t is to be sold next Wednesday 
by the candle. Messrs. Nowell, Story, and Bellamy present an 
order from the House of Commons concerning the loan of some 
of the Company's ordnance for protection of the City ; they are told 
that this Court cannot lend any without the consent of a general 
court, which has already been denied, but, to show how ready the 
Committees are to comply with Parliament, a general court shall 
be called next Wednesday afternoon, when the order now presented 
shall be read, and the resolution of the generality made known that 
evening. A bond of 400/. accepted from Messrs. Stone and 
Staresmore to pay their debt of 240/. to the Company by Mid- 
summer. A general court of sales ordered to be held next 
Friday afternoon. ( r ^ //.) 

A Court of Committees, April 12, 1643 [Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 309). 

Mr. Biggs desiring a piece of ground, fifty feet by five, near the 
smithy at Blackwall, he is told that, when it has been viewed 
by Sir John Gayre and Captain Styles, he shall have an answer. 
The policy of assurance for 30,000/. to be landed at Surat from the 
Dolphin, Hitid and Seaflozver, and the other policy of assurance 
for 70,000/, to be landed in London for account of the Fourth Joint 
Stock are read, and it is agreed that each adventurer may insure 
half his subscription outwards and the whole on the return. The 
London to be sold for 400/. without bowsprit, mizenmast, or boat, 
or the cables and anchors holding her. Captain Herriott 
Washborne and Mr. Benjamin Washborne accepted as securities 
for Captain Washborne's debt for sugar bought of the Company. 
The price of garbled pepper fixed at 19^. per lb. for 100 bags at 
three six months ; Messina silk at 24J. per lb. at two six months ; 
and of indigo at 4^-. dd. per lb., 100 or 200 barrels, at three six 
months, fifty to be sold in a parcell. The Deputy and certain 
Committees desired to examine the calicoes at 8 o'clock to-morrow 
morning, that it may be better known at the next court how to 
price them, (i/.) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 317 

A General Court, April 12, 1643 {Court Book. vol. xviii, 
p. 310). 

The London, burden 800 tons, with her price set at 350/., is sold 
to Mr. John Taylour for 380/. without boat, bowsprit, mizenmast, 
cables, or anchors, and the Company to be at no further charge for 
her, though Mr. Taylour, on request, is lent a mooring cable and 
anchor to take her to Wapping. The last general court is read 
and Mr. Deputy, referring to the former order received from the 
' close Committee of Parlyament ' to lend some of the Company's 
ordnance for defence of the City, acquaints the court that since then 
a similar order has been received from the House of Commons ^ ; 
this is read, and it appears that the Committee for Fortifications has 
power to take the said ordnance if the Company refuses to lend it. 
Mr. Deputy therefore desires that this be considered and an 
answer returned ; but no one speaking, he puts it to the question 
whether the ordnance shall be lent or not, and by a general 
erection of hands the answer is in the negative. Mr. Deputy 
then reports that the Company's house has been assessed at 35/. 
per week ; as this is generally considered an injury he assures 
the generality that the Court of Committees will do its best to get 
it revoked. He further intimates that the Committees have 
ordered a policy to be drawn up to insure the safe landing of 
30,000/. at Surat by the Dolphin, Hind, and Seqflower, at a 
premium of 3/. \qs. per cent., in which each may insure half his 
adventure, and another policy to insure 70,000/. being returned and 
landed in London for the account of the Fourth Joint Stock at the 
rate of il. loj. per cent., in which each may insure his whole 
adventure. The time for underwriting in the first policy is to be until 
Friday night, when, if the 30,000/. is not fully underwritten, any 
may add to their former subscription, or others be permitted to 
underwrite. Both policies are presented, and all are desired 
to underwrite while in court. {'^\ pp.) 

A Court of Committees, April 14, 1643 {Conrt Book, vol. 
xviii, p. 312). 

Rose, wife of Robert Fuller, who died at Bantam, to be allowed 
the money remaining in the Company's hands for the use of her 

^ See Commons' Journal, vol. iii, p. 30. 



3i8 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

daughter on giving two sufficient securities. The goods intended 
for sale at ' Marcellis ' [Marseilles] to be consigned to Messrs. 
Jackson and Hollsworthy. On information that the Company is 
assessed ^^l. per week towards the weekly contribution of 10,000/. 
ordered by Parliament to be paid by the city of London, the 
Deputy and certain Committees are desired to wait on the Com- 
mittee of Aldermen appointed by Parliament and endeavour to get 
the said contribution revoked. Mr. Woodall's account of 247/. Ss. ^d. 
for surgeons' chests ordered to be paid. (| /.) 

A General Court of Sales, April 14, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 313). 

Sale of Sinda calicoes, defective calicoes, brown wrappers, wax- 
cloths, dust of cloves, and garbled pepper, with prices and names of 
purchasers. {^% pp.) 

A Court of Committees, April 19, 1643 {Court Booh, vol. 
xviii, p. 315). 

Mr. Garway intimates that, if the Mercury is to go to Leghorn 
without touching at Marseilles, he will undertake to carry from the 
former place without further charge whatever indigo is consigned 
for sale to Marseilles, or he is willing to go first to Marseilles and 
then to Leghorn as at first agreed ; this is left for further considera- 
tion. The Deputy reports that, according to a former order, 100/. 
has been bestowed on those Members of Parliament who have done 
the Company particular service, but that another 100/. is necessary, 
and that it will be advisable for two or three more Committees to 
help in this matter ; the second 100/. is granted, but no more 
Committees appointed, those already named being directed to 
dispose of the money as they think fit. The Deputy and Messrs. 
Garway and Methwold accepted as securities for calicoes. Mr. 
Methwold complains concerning certain wrappers he bought at the 
last court of sales, but is told that he must abide by his bargain. 
Mr. Pennoyer's offer to buy twenty barrels of indigo for 4J-. 6d. per 
lb. at three six months is refused, the quantity being so small. 
Philip Mead, Giles Dent, Joshua Woolnough, Benjamin Goodwin, 
and Thomas Lambe accepted as securities for calicoes bought by 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 319 

Mr. Woolnough. The Deputy presents an abstract of business 
necessary to be seen to at once, and the Secretary is directed to 
deHver a written note of their employment to the several Committees 
who have agreed to undertake the work, which is as follows : to 
examine what part of the cargo of the Mary, William, and London 
has been exported, to get in all the impost bills, that allowance 
may be made to the ' Joynt Company,' and to clear accounts for 
these three ships with the Committee of Customs this next week ; 
to assist Mr. Bowen in setting apart sufficient calicoes to serve such 
warrants as are or ought to be delivered out on all former divisions, 
and to make an inventory of those remaining and divide them into 
lots ready for sale ; also to assist Mr. Blount and the Secretary in 
setting apart silk and cloves sufficient for all warrants, that the 
remainder may be put to sale with the indigo and pepper ; to look 
after all business connected with the Yard at Blackwall and prevent 
the embezzlement of timber, and to lessen all unnecessary expenses ; 
to examine the Company's standing charges and point out where 
these may be lessened now that the Stock is smaller and unable to 
bear so great a burden as other Stocks have done : to examine and 
give in a balance of last year's Particular Voyage, with the cost of 
each ship dispeeded and their cargoes, and to ascertain whether 
everything concerning that Stock is posted in the journal and 
ledger : also to examine the cost and cargoes of all ships sent out 
this year for the Fourth Joint Stock and present a balance of it, as 
it appears in England, to the Court, and to see that everything is 
duly entered, {'^pp) 

A Court of Committees, April 21, 1643 {Couri Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 318). 

Sixty barrels of flat indigo sold to Mr. Pennoyer at 4^-. 6d. 
per lb., half to be paid for in eight months' time and the remainder 
six months after, the Committees present at next Monday's court 
to fix the security. Mr. Taylour agrees to buy twenty or thirty of 
the Company's guns at 10^. 6d. per hundred at twelve months' time, 
the Company to stand the hazard of their being proved, and 
Mr. Taylour the charge ; Mr. Fotherby to be present at the trial to 
see that the guns have only the ordinary charge, and Mr. Taylour 
to take them away within ten days. Mr. Taylour is lent the pump, 



320 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

chain, and wheel belonging to the Londoji on agreeing to return 
them, with the cable and anchor formerly lent, within a month. 

(lA) 

A Court of Committees, April 34, 1643 [Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 319). 

John and Thomas Taylour accepted as securities for the London 
and for ordnance bought of the Company ; and the long-boat, oars, 
and a hawser lent to Mr. Taylour to take the London to Wapping, 
he promising to return them in as good condition as when lent. 
A letter is read from Mr. Cramporne, of Plymouth ; the Court 
resolves to desire him to provide a small boat with six, eight, or ten 
men, to lie off the Channel for three months from the 15th of June 
next, to advise the Company's homeward-bound ships (because 
of the distraction of the times) not to put into Scilly, Falmouth, or 
any western port, and not to board any ship or suffer any one to 
board them, but to be on their guard and make the Downs their 
first port if possible ; also to desire him to hire two men who know 
the Parliament ships, that one may be sent aboard the Company's 
ships to point out the Parliament ships, and those set out from 
Falmouth, that they may be avoided, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees, April 37, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 320). 

A petition from the ships' carpenters is read, in which they pray 
to be allowed the privilege of their predecessors, and of all carpen- 
ters working in the yards along the Thames, to carry away the 
chips from the yard ; the petitioners, fifteen in number, are called in 
and told that, because of the great abuses committed in this respect, 
the Court is resolved to adhere to its former resolution not to allow 
any chips to be taken away by the workmen in the yard, but to pay 
them weekly for their daily work as usual, and those who refuse 
work now on these terms will not be employed hereafter if they ask 
for work. Fortune, wife of Thomas Johnson, cook in the Crispian, 
to be allowed 3/. yearly from her husband's wages during his 
absence. Mr. Fotherby ordered to pay the monthly assessment 
of 35J. for the Company's houses, land, and docks at Blackwall. 
(I A) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 331 

A Court of Committees, May 3, 1643 {Court Book,vo\. xviii, 

P- 3^0- 

The request of the sister of Robert Wooder, who died in Persia 
about ten years ago, to receive the money due upon her brother's 
account, is refused, as Wooder owes the Company about 200/. 
Rose Fuller is given 40^-. and interest is allowed her at the rate 
of eight per cent, on the 15/. remaining in the Company's hands 
towards her child's maintenance ; and on account of her own great 
poverty she is given 2os. from the poor-box. A letter from 
Marseilles is read and the Court resolves that none of the pepper, 
cloves, or indigo shipped in the Mercury shall be sent to that place, 
but that one hundred bags of pepper and ten barrels of indigo from 
the said ship shall be landed at Messina at the freight formerly 
agreed on, and the rest of the goods at Leghorn. Mr. Garway, 
being freed from his contract to go to Marseilles, promises to carry 
the same quantity of goods from Leghorn to Messina free of 
freight. The factors at Genoa to be directed to take out of the 
Unicorn as many cloves as with those received from the Love 
will make thirty hogsheads, forty barrels of indigo, and one hundred 
bags of pepper, for sale, the goods remaining to be landed at 
Leghorn, Mr. Methwold to receive 1,000/. assigned to him upon 
the Company by Mr. Greene and the Committee of Parliament 
for the Navy and Custom-house business. Sir John Nulls giving 
a receipt. William Vincent and George Smith, Junior, accepted 
as securities for silk and pepper. Mrs. Bennett Samms, widow 
of Edward Samms, allowed to adventure her valuation of twenty- 
five per cent. (152/. lOj-.) in the Fourth Joint Stock. {i\pp) 

A Court of Committees, May 5, 1643 {Cotirt Book, vol. xviii, 

P- 323)- 

William Satterford granted admission to the Compan)''s alms- 
house at Blackwall, but cautioned that his wife is not to lodge there 
but only to assist him in the daytime. Thomas Gee is entertained 
as master of one of the ships now being built, as he has served the 
Company many years and is well reported of as an excellent 
mariner ; no wages are assigned to him, but he is desired to go to 
Blackwall once or twice a week and have an eye to the two ships 



3az COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

building there. The Deputy reports that he has received informa- 
tion of certain abuses committed at Blackwall Yard ; he is desired 
to meet certain Committees at the house of Sir John Gayre at 
seven o'clock on Wednesday morning, to examine four men who 
can and are willing to give particulars concerning this. A court 
of sales appointed to be held on Wednesday week for disposal 
of 40,000 calicoes, pepper, indigo, and Messina silk ; and a bill 
is ordered to be put up at the Exchange to give notice of this, and 
that if any intend to treat for part of the said commodities before- 
hand the Committees are willing to do so. Two policies of insur- 
ance of 12,000/. each to be taken out for the Unicorn and Mercury 
at the rate of 3/. per cent. A list of those indebted to the Company 
is presented, whereby it appears that Mr. Holloway owes more 
than 3,000/. ; he is requested to pay, and promises to do so within 
a month. Spiller is ordered to put the bills of all who do not pay 
in suit. {'^\pp-) 

A Court of Committees, May 12, 1643 (Cour^ Book, vol. xviii, 
P- 334). 

A bill presented by Solomon Smith for 10/. for charges incurred 
in going twice to Rochester to serve Cobb with a writ, and for 
arresting Regimont, the French captain, is ordered to be paid. 
Mr. Russell desires to receive for the use of John Willcox S^^l. 
upon discount, the profits of an adventure of 1,000/. lately belonging 
to Lord Brooke ^ ; as neither Russell nor Willcox can give a dis- 
charge for the said money, the adventure having been assigned by 
a deed under Lord Brooke's hand to Gregory Clement, who dis- 
claims any ' propriety ' in it, Russell is desired to wait until this 
business is cleared by Willcox, until when eight per cent, interest 
shall be allowed from the 4th of May last. A dispute between the 
Company and Mr. Massingberd concerning an adventure of 1,000/. 
sold by the latter to Captain Weddall in September 1631, and 
about the said Captain's receipt of 900/. odd paid him by the 
Company to make good his subscription of 1,200/., is deferred 
for determination. Ordered that any one buying calicoes to the 
value of 1,000/. shall have four six months' time for payment, but 

' Lord Brooke had been killed on March 2, while commanding the Parliamentary 
forces at Lichfield. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 323 

under that value three six months. Richard Swinglehurst's bill 
of 31/. 17J. to be paid. Mr. Massingberd to be paid his valuation 
of twenty-five per cent, in the Third Joint Stock (4,499/. 'i-'js. 6d.) 
upon discount {"^\pp) 

A Court of Committees, May 17, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xviii, 
p. 326). 

John Woodall being very sick and weak and therefore unable 
to serve the Company any more, his nephew, Henry Boone, is 
entertained as ' chirurgion ' in his place. Mr. Biggs attending 
to hear the Court's answer to his request for some ground at 
Blackwall, Sir John Gayre reports that he and Captain Styles 
viewed the desired ground and think that six foot ' from out to out 
in breadth ' might be granted ; this should not be sold, or let 
on lease, but Mr. Biggs should take it from year to year and give 
some acknowledgment for it, the Company to be at no charge for 
removing the bridge or making the wall or gate, all this to be paid 
for by Mr. Biggs. These proposals were agreed to by erection 
of hands and the acknowledgment to be paid fixed at \2d. per 
annum. Mr. Biggs is called in and told of these conditions ; he 
desires not to be tied by any acknowledgment, but is told that this 
is to keep his tenants from annoying the Company in any way and 
must be agreed to ; whereupon he, being unwilling to make any 
payment, leaves the court. (li//.) 

A General Court of Sales, May 17, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 327). 

Two pieces of ' Colchester bayes ' and a remnant of twelve 
and a half yards sold for 12/. 4J-. to Mr. John Frith. (5/.) 

A Court of Committees, May 19, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 328). 

The broke of 31/. os. gd. charged upon the adventure of William 
Leman, for interest on several bills for goods bought of the Com- 
pany, is reduced to 10/. Lucy Bcarblocke and Margaret Coates 
petition concerning a house standing on the Company's ground 
at Blackwall, bought twenty years ago by their mother, Lucy Ash- 
more, ' for making of spunne yarn and twice layd ropes.* About 

Y 2 



324 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

fourteen years ago the Company granted to Boatswain Ingram 
a piece of the same ground, on which he built three houses, and 
then took down the petitioners' house (' which stood upon 
a sufficient wharfe ') and rebuilt it on the marsh to its great 
prejudice. They understand that Ingram is now to have a good 
part of the same ground whereon their warehouse stands, which 
if again removed will be exposed to ruin. They beg that their 
house and ground may ' remaine to them as formerly '. This peti- 
tion is referred to Sir John Gayre and Captain Styles. Twenty 
thousand pipestaves to be bought. Derebauds, kerebauds, and 
eckbarees ^ sold to James Martyn. Mr, Methwold buys the re- 
maining wrappers, and Mr. Massingberd offers to take the rest 
of the indigo at 4s. ^d. per lb. at five six months, but is told that 
he shall have it for 4^-. 6d. per lb. at the time stated. Thomas 
Rundell is entertained to prosecute runaways and their sureties, 
Rilston promising to be his security and that he shall give account 
of all bonds entrusted to him, of which Markham is to take an 
account every quarter, and Mr. Hurt to deliver all of that nature 
to Rundell, who is to be allowed one-third of what is collected. 
Mr. Bowen's request for skins and outside packing stuff of ' gunnells 
and base ropes' referred to the Committees for the calico ware- 
house. (i|//-) 

A Court of Committees, May 26, 1643 [Cowt Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 330). 

Messina silk sold to John Bludworth at 23^-. per lb., the money 
to be discounted for eleven months and two months in, the tare for 
each bale to be 31b. Broderas^ sold to William White and 
Lodowicke Hodges at js. 6d. and los. the piece at three six 
months ; and Captain Richard Cranley, William White, and Richard 
Hill accepted as securities. Philip Mead and John Harper ac- 
cepted as securities for broad baftas ^ and Synda dorbellas * bought 
by them. James Martyn and John Frith accepted as securities 

^ These are all described as calicoes. They probably represent goods from Daryabad 
.and Khairabad, and some named Akbaris after the Emperor Akbar. 
- Calicoes from Baroda, the old spelling of which was ' Brodera '. 
^ This term covered more than one kind of cotton goods. 
* Possibly a Portuguese name for some variety of calico brought from Tatta. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 325 

for calicoes bought by the former. Garbled pepper sold to John 
Law at iSd. per lb. at three six months. The remaining parcel 
of flat indigo sold to Richard Clutterbuck and the dust to 
Mr. Massingberd. An order dated the 17th instant from the 
House of Commons ^ is read, and the Court directs that nothing 
be paid to Sir Peter Richault without an order from Parliament. 

A Court of Committees, June 2,, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 331). 

The Committees order that none of the indigo bought by 
Mr. Clutterbuck be delivered until he has subscribed the bargain, 
and that 1,000/. over and above the value of what is delivered 
is always to remain in the Company's hands. Narrow ' Broaderas ' 
sold to James Martyn at an abated price. {\ p.) 

A Court of Committees, June 9, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 332). 

Rilston is directed to buy forty tons of cider. Charles Deane, 
an almsman at Poplar, given 20s. from the poor-box for reading 
daily prayers for the last year. On a note from Captain Cranley, 
Mr. Bowen is directed to deliver the calicoes bought by Messrs. 
White and Hodges, the Captain undertaking that Mr. Hill shall 
subscribe the bargain upon his return from Dover. Mr. Blount 
is ordered to weigh and deliver the indigo bought by Mr. Clutter- 
buck. The Court, taking into consideration the damage done 
by carts passing over ' Blackwall Cawsey ', orders a gate to be made 
at the entrance to Poplar, with a ' turned style ' on one side and 
a stile about three feet high for foot passengers on the other, 
the gate to be kept locked and no carts to pass except for the 
Company's occasions and by its permission. A list of those 
indebted to the Company above two months is read ; and Lord 
Cottington owing 50,304/. for pepper, Spiller is directed to confer 
with Mr. Acton as to the best course to be taken with Sir Paul 
Pindar, Sir Job Harby, Sir John Jacob, and Sir John Nulls for 
recovery of this amount. He is also told to speak with Mr. Burton 
about the 4,000/, due long since from him and others for. indigo. 

' See the note on p. 328, and Commohs' Jotinial, vol. iii, p. 90. 



^26 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, June i6, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. z?,^). 

The resolution forbidding any cart to pass from Poplar to Black- 
wall without permission is read, and Giles Shepheard appointed 
to keep the key of the gate to be erected and to let none pass upon 
the causeway without paying id. per cart, this money to be used 
for repairs ; Shepheard to give an account of the receipts, and 
to have an increase of salary. As many of the Committees as can 
are entreated to go to Deptford and Blackwall and examine the 
stores and provisions in the yards, and resolve what is best concern- 
ing them. Sir Thomas Hamersley having underwritten 1,000/. 
in the Particular Voyage but only paid in 750/., and Edward 
Browne having underwritten 150/. but only paid in ^il^- T-'^s., they 
are to be accounted adventurers only for as much as they have paid 
in, and to receive profits accordingly, but if any loss is incurred 
to bear their share according to their subscriptions (as is settled 
by the preamble), they being the only two who have not paid 
up fully. Boatswain Ingram's bill of 9/. o^s. to be paid. Cowley 
is entertained as boatswain of the largest ship now building at 
Blackwall, to keep account of all goods taken into or from the said 
vessel on her outward and homeward voyage. Determination con- 
cerning provision of coral for the next ships is deferred. The 
Deputy's purchase of twenty tons of Spanish iron at 15/. per ton 
at six months is approved. (15 /A) 

A Meeting at Deptford, June 19, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. '3,'>,S). 

Having viewed the yard and stone wharf at Deptford, the Com- 
mittees think that, as the Company has no use for them, both the 
freehold land and that held from the Bridgehouse should be put up 
for sale. (^ p.) 

A Meeting at Blackwall, June 19, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 2>ZS). 

Ordered that the gable-end of the smith's forge towards the 
river, and the gable-end of the west part of the boat-house, be made 
of brick, and the post of the boat-house cut off; that a partition 
be made on the west side of the warehouse as far as the post, to go 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 327 

along the joiner's room standing by the saw-pit, to put the 
sheathing boards in. On consideration of the request of Lucy 
Bearblocke and Margaret Coates, the Court orders that, if their 
house is repaired within a month, they may remain in it, and con- 
tinue making spun yarn and ropes for the Company. The request 
of Boatswain Ingram for six foot of ground at the south-west end 
of Blackwall Causeway, and for six old masts, is refused. Captain 
Jourden and others are desired to decide upon cables and cordage 
necessary for the next ships. An account of timber and plank 
bought for building the two ships, amounting to 2,345/., is read ; 
Steevens states what will be required and is advised not to buy 
more than is absolutely necessary. The Court orders seventy-five 
tons of cordage to be spun and laid in tar for the two new ships ; 
small cables to be made out of four or five not likely to be used, 
thus effecting a saving of 230/., but none to be sent to Sandwich ; 
the wharf to be repaired, but not the slaughterhouses ; wooden 
windows to be put in the storehouse ; and a cart-horse bought, 
if Parliament keeps the one lately taken. Mr. Biggs's demand for 
5/., for curing the broken thigh of the Persian boy in the Company's 
service, is deferred for consideration. The 'haire loft'^ is ordered 
to be repaired. (2|//-) 

A Court of Committees, June 23, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 338). 

The proceedings of the Deputy and Committees at Blackwall 
and Deptford are read and confirmed. A court for election of 
Governor, Deputy, Treasurer, and Committees appointed to be 
held Wednesday sennight in the afternoon. Consideration had 
whether a Committee shall go to the Downs next Monday 
or Tuesday to await the arrival of the expected ships from the 
Indies and to prevent them being boarded by private traders; 
nothing is resolved, for if the wind is easterly the said ships may 
put into some harbour on the west coast. A messenger from 
Lord Harbert desires to know if the Company is willing to buy the 
inheritance of that part of its ground at Blackwall '^ which is with- 

1 ' Haire ' is an obsolete form of ' air '. Probably the loft was used for airing goods. 

2 The Company's property at Blackwall formed part of the manor of Stepney, which 
belonged to the Earl of Cleveland. He had already raised large sums on the security 



328 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

out ' composicion,' and to make the fine certain ; but his demand 
being ' soe vast ', the Court is unwilling to treat with the messenger, 
whereupon he replies that he will confer with Mr. Acton and then 
return. Upon the petition of Nicholas Jerard, who has been in- 
debted to the Company over twenty years and against whom there 
is a suit, his adventure in the Second Joint Stock and profits 
arising from it are ordered to be accounted as part payment of the 
said debt, he promising to make up the remainder by paying 50/. 
next week and for six weeks in succession, until the whole is paid. 
Adam Bowen is allowed to have all the old gunnells, skins, and 
' basse ropes ' in the upper warehouse at Leadenhall, on condition 
that he reserves as many as may be necessary for shipping calicoes. 
The request of John Woodall for something towards ' the repayre 
of his languishing necessities and his better support ', he being old 
and bed-ridden and his grown-up children ' lying very heavy upon 
him', which with his many losses and misfortunes compels him 
to appeal to the Court, is refused, some of the Committees having 
inquired and found that he is not in need and has a sufficient estate. 
James Martyn to be allowed \d. per lb. for dust of pepper from the 
Mary. The Deputy acquaints the Court that he has received 
a warrant from Mr. John Trenchard, 'a Parlyament man,' who 
is chairman of accounts at Goldsmiths' Hall, concerning a debt 
of 1,656/. due from the Company to Sir Peter Richaut about the 
loth of August next^; it is desired that this money be paid 
to Parliament upon discount to supply Sir William Waller, but 
as Parliament has not Sir Peter's bill, Mr. Trenchard promised 
to procure an ordinance to save the Company harmless for paying 
it by deducting the money out of the subsidy of the next goods 
received from the Indies if the bill cannot be procured by August, 
and he also promised to come this morning with some others for 

of his estates, and apparently he was now endeavouring (through a friend) to realize 
a portion of his property. 

' Sir Peter Ricaut, as a generous supporter of the King's cause, fell early under the 
displeasure of the Parliament. On May 17, 1643, the East India Company was ordered 
to make no further payments to him without permission. On June 21 the Commons 
ordered his estate to be sequestered, and 5,000/. out of it to be paid to Sir William 
Waller. A sum of 1,500/. of his in the hands of the East India Company was also to be 
sequestered, the Company being given an indemnity for the same. On the 23rd Trenchard 
and another member were ordered to go to the Company and treat with them on the 
subject. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 329 

the Company's answer. The Deputy and certain Committees are 
entreated to await their coming and to act as they think best in 
this matter, but not to pay more than 1,600/. CaHcoes (broad 
' Broderas ', ' Suratt narrowes ', and ' merculees ') sold to Philip Mead 
and Thomas Lambe on the Exchange. Sufficient canvas to be 
bought to make 2 ,000 pepper bags by the return of the next ships. 

A Court of Committees, June 30, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xviii, p. 340). 

Advices to be sent to Leghorn and Genoa for coral to be pro- 
vided to the value of ao,ooo or 24,000 ducats. Sir John Gayre 
and Alderman Reynardson are desired to assist the Deputy and 
Treasurer, in the absence of the Governor, in the distribution 
of gratifications to the Committees. Mr. Bowen is directed to send 
to each adventurer's house such divisions of calicoes as belong 
to them. Richard Clutterbuck admitted to the freedom of the 
Company on payment of 5/. ; he is reminded that he has not yet 
given any security for the indigo he lately bought, whereupon 
he declares his willingness to do so and to take the risk of any loss 
that may meanwhile happen to the indigo. The estate of the late 
Henry Griffin, amounting to 57/. i8j-. \d., to be paid to his 
administratrix, Elizabeth Clarke (now the wife of Thomas Rolfe), 
on her husband and Captain William Thompson giving a bond 
to save the Company harmless. The Deputy and other Com- 
mittees having been empowered by two several orders of the 
Court to give away 200/. in gratuities, and the sum disbursed 
amounting to 208/. 15^. a warrant for the same is ordered to be 
made out. The petition of Katherine, widow of John Potter, 
administrator of the late John Skibbowe, for the remainder of the 
latter's estate, is refused, as nothing is due upon it ; but in con- 
sideration of her great poverty she is given 5/. from the poor-box 
and the 5/. paid by Mr. Clutterbuck for his admittance to the 
freedom of the Company. Mr. Trcnchard presents an order from 
Parliament made yesterday, requiring the Company to transfer 
the interest Sir Peter Richaut has in any adventure in the trade 
of the Company to whom the Committee of Accounts shall con- 



330 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

tract with to buy the same.^ After debate, the Court replies that 
this cannot be done, as Sir Peter might enforce the value of his 
adventure from the Company ' beyond sea ', and no adventure can 
be transferred without the consent of its owner, his heirs, or execu- 
tors. Mr. Trenchard is shown the book which every adventurer 
selling or transferring his adventure signs, and is told that if it were 
possible to comply with the order of Parliament it would dishearten 
all men from adventuring in or giving credit to the Company. 
Mr. Trenchard hereupon assures the Court that Parliament has no 
desire to entrench upon the Company, but that he would like 
to know when any division is made upon Sir Peter's adventure 
to whom it will be delivered. He is told that, when any division 
either in goods or money is made, it is delivered to the true owner 
or to whom it legally belongs. Thereupon he desires that the 
transfer of Sir Peter's adventure may be considered at the next 
court. {l\pp) 

A Court of Committees, July 5, 1643 {Coiiri Book, vol. xviii, 
P- 343)- 

Benjamin Robinson is heard concerning the charges made against 
him from Surat for buying indigo without commission, by which he 
is alleged to have caused a loss to the Company of 2,436/. After 
some consideration, the Court resolves that, as Robinson has served 
the Company for over ten years in India, is very capable, and has 
but little estate, he shall pay i ,000/. ; 400/. or 500/. due to him as 
salary will be deducted from this, and the remainder is to be paid 
in two months' time. At his request he is re-entertained for five 
years at 200/, per annum and, occasion requiring, he is to be sent in 
the next ships to India, in which case he is to pay 100/. yearly (zs. 
to be reckoned for every rupee) until his debt is cancelled. Mean- 
while he is to receive his three carpets and sixty books of coarse 
calicoes now in the custody of Sir Henry Garway. (i|^i>.) 

^ On June 24 the House ordered the sale of Ricaut's adventures in the East India 
trade ; and on the 29th an order was passed, directing the Company to transfer his interest 
to such persons as the Committee of Accounts might indicate. Two days later, an 
' ordinance ' to this effect was ordered to be prepared. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 331 

A General Court of Election, July 5, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xix, p. i). 

Mr, Deputy informs the generality that they are called together 
to elect a Governor, Deputy, Treasurer, and Committees for the 
ensuing year, and desires them to name whom they please to fill 
these posts ; whereupon Sir John Cordell, Sir John Gayre, Aldermen 
Reynardson and Ashwell, and Mr, William Cockayne are nominated 
to act as Governor, and by erection of hands the last-named is 
chosen and takes the oath in court accordingly, Messrs, Methwold, 
Burnell, and Willson are then nominated for the post of Deputy, 
and Mr, Methwold is chosen and sworn, Messrs. Robert Bate- 
man and John Massingberd are nominated to act as Treasurer, 
and Mr. Bateman is chosen and takes the prescribed oath, A 
question arises whether the eight Committees to be elected must 
be adventurers in the Old Joint Stock, or in the Particular Voyage, 
or in both ; and it is resolved that only those having adventures 
both in the Fourth Joint Stock and in the Particular Voyage 
shall be eligible. Hereupon Sir John Cordell, Sir Jacob Garrad, 
John Bludworth, John Beale, John Ellwayes, Jarvis Elwayes, 
Ozias Churchman, Richard Davies, William Willyams, Thomas 
Andrews, Jeremy Elwayes, and William Allen are nominated, and 
the following chosen : Cordell, Garrad, Bludworth, Davies, Church- 
man, Beale, Andrews, and Willyams ; those retiring are William 
Methwold (having been chosen Deputy), Sir John Wolstenholme, 
Sir Thomas Soame, Sir Nicholas Crispe, Messrs. Sainthill, Vivian, 
Wright, and Rich. Thus the Committees for the ensuing year are: 
Sir John Cordell, Sir John Gayre, Sir Jacob Garrad, Sir George 
Clarke, Messrs. Reynardson, Ashwell, Holloway, Willson, Burnell, 
Styles, Middleton, Keate, Kerridge, Massingberd, Garway, Bateman, 
Abdy, Davies, Bludworth, Churchman, Beale, Willyams, Andrews, 
and Morewood. Finally Richard Swinglehurst is re-elected Secre- 
tary and takes the oath for the due execution of his work, Samuel 
Gearing presents a petition from himself and his father, John Gearing, 
showing that they were lately indebted to the Company for about 
800/. : that the said John Gearing sustained great losses by the 
plundering of Reading, Newbury and 'Cicister ' [Cirencester], where 
a great part of his estate and trade was, and had part of his dwell- 
ing blown up by gunpowder, so that he is unable to pay his other 



SSZ COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

creditors more than 15^-. in the pound ; that of late they have 
paid 618/. of that debt, and now because of their disability they 
desire that the brokes upon the said money may be taken off 
from the time it was due, and that 218/. due to John Gearing 
from the Company may be allowed to him upon discount to make 
up the rest. The Court replies that until Mr. Gearing can say 
when the remainder of the debt shall be paid nothing can be 
done, but the brokes shall be referred to the Court of Committees 
for the abatement of 50/. or 60/., as it shall judge best, (s^//".) 

A Court of Committees, July 7, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, 

P-3)- 

Benjamin Robinson's petition that the fine imposed upon him 
may be lessened is refused. Messrs. Abdy and Willyams are 
entreated to go to Dover or the Downs and board the ships daily 
expected from the Indies and remain in them until they arrive at 
Erith ; it is also hoped that Messrs. Rich and Vivian will accom- 
pany them, as the said ships are for the Particular Voyage, in 
which both are adventurers. Younge and Spiller are ordered to 
attend the said Committees, with six others to be appointed, so 
that four may go aboard each ship and watch by night to see 
that no Londoner or private trader comes aboard, and to hinder 
any goods being taken out. At the request of Thomas Biggs, 
the chirurgeon, the Court, for the better accommodation of his 
tenants at Blackwall, lets him six feet of ground by the smithy 
from the outside of one wall to the other, and from the smith's 
door to the bridge, for two or three years, he paying \id. per 
annum as an acknowledgment. Mr. Biggs promises to surrender 
at the next court held for the manor of Stepney all his pre- 
tended interest in the ground from the wharf northwards to the 
low-water mark at Blackwall, which is not yet surrendered, and 
the Court promises that if his tenants do not annoy or prejudice 
the Company the desired ground shall be let to him for such 
consideration as shall be required. (li//.) 

A Court of Committees, July 14, 1643 {CourtBook, vol. xix, 
P-5)- 

Captain Elias Jourden, Messrs. William Swanley, Anthony 
Tutchen, and Thomas Gee having been desired to decide upon 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 333 

the size of cordage and cables for the two ships now building, 
and to consider whether the cordage should be of a finer spin- 
ning and consequently smaller in size than formerly, a certificate 
signed by all but Mr. Tutchen is read, in which they assert that 
it would be neither safe nor convenient for the spinning and 
quality of the cordage to be altered ; whereupon the Court gives 
order accordingly. Mr. Governor shows a letter dated the 
6th inst., directed to himself and the Deputy and signed by 
Mr. Miles Corbett, a Member of Parliament and Chairman of 
the Committee for Reducing Newcastle and the adjacent parts, 
for which purpose they are setting forth two ships for Holy 
Island, and not having ordnance desire the Company to lend 
three whole and three demi culverins from its store at the 
Tower Wharf for six months ; upon receipt of this letter the 
Governor and Deputy waited on the Committee and informed 
the members of the former refusal of the generality to lend 
ordnance for defence of the city ; Mr. Governor supposes the 
Committee was satisfied and hopes that nothing more will be heard 
of this request. An account of those owing money to the Company 
above two months is read and consideration had of Lord Cotting- 
ton's great debt of 50,304/. due long since for pepper sold to him ; 
the Governor, the Deputy, and certain Committees are desired 
to meet and treat with Sir Paul Pindar, Sir Job Harby, and Sir 
John Nulls, who are bound for payment of this money ; they are 
also desired to treat with Mr. Holloway about his debt to the 
Company. One of Sir Peter Richaut's sons requests 1,300/., due to 
his father and Captain Goodlad for the ship Peter and Andreiv 
sold to the Company by the said Captain ; he is told that many of 
the guns, &c., are defective and for these satisfaction is required ; he 
is advised to confer with the Husband and Mr. P'otherby and to 
perfect the account, when he shall receive an answer. Benjamin 
Robinson is lent 100/. for six months, he and Mr. Fotherby giving 
bond for payment. Mr. Martyn buys ' Amadavad, Broaderas, and 
guldarecs ^ ' and agrees to pay for them in five six months. (2 pp.) 

' 'Guldaiees' (Pers. gul-Jdr, 'spotted' or 'flowered') were white turban-cloths 
ornamented at the ends in gold or silver thread. ' Amadavad ' is the old spelling of 
Ahmadabad. 



334 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, July 22, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, 
P-7)- 

The Crispiana, Aleppo Merchant, and Reformation having arrived 
in the Thames, it is resolved to call a general court on Tuesday of 
all the adventurers, both in the Joint Stock and in the Particular 
Voyage. Sheriff Langham to be paid 150/. for a year's rent of the 
brick warehouse let to the Company by the Earl of Northampton. 
The Court, understanding from the letters received by the Crispiana 
and Aleppo Merchant from Surat that great use may be made there 
of a ship of about 160 or 170 tons, Steevens is directed to begin 
building such a vessel, that will not draw more than nine foot 
of water. (|/.) 

A General Court, July 25, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 8). 

The Governor tells the adventurers that three ships, the Crispian, 
Aleppo Merchant, and Reformation, are returned, of which the two 
first are for the account of the Particular Voyage and the other for 
the Joint Stock ; that the value of the Crispian and Aleppo Mer- 
chant is estimated at 139,000/., and that of the Reformation at 
34,000/. ; the former sum proceeds from a capital of 51,000/. sent to 
the northwards ; and it only remains to provide money to pay 
freight, customs, and other charges for the Particular Voyage, and 
to resolve by the next court how to dispose of the goods. The 
Governor then desires all adventurers in the Joint Stock who have 
not taken their goods from the Company's warehouse to do so, and 
not to expect money for their divisions ; and he repeats the warning 
that all goods left in the warehouse are at their owner's and not the 
Company's risk. He next remarks that some new way of ware- 
housing the goods returned for the Particular Voyage has been 
mentioned, and desires those who have anything to say to speak ; 
whereupon one adventurer observes that some desire to know the 
charge of the warehouse room ; he is told that eight men were 
appointed for the Joint Stock and eight for the Particular Voyage 
to settle these and other matters ; the sixteen names are read, and 
Sir John Wolstenholme (appointed one of the eight for the Joint 
Stock) being out of town, Sir George Clarke is chosen to fill his 
place ; Sir Nicholas Crispe, Messrs. Robert Sainthill and Robert 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 335 

Gardiner are also away from London, and George Francklyn dead 
(all four appointed for the Particular Voyage) ; therefore Messrs. 
John Smith, James Mann, Thomas Rich, and Robert Gayre are 
chosen in their stead. Mr. Governor further reports that for the 
continuance and better prosecution of the trade the Court of Com- 
mittees has ordered two ships and a pinnace to be built ; that 
nothing is wanting but a good stock, and if a double stock could be 
obtained and dispatched to India it would * perfect the worke ', for 
the trade there is as good as ever, the factors honest and able, and 
those at Surat advise the Company that they could do ten times 
their present work at the same cost. Mr. Deputy observes that for 
want of a double stock the honour of the Company is brought into 
question by money having to be borrowed from any who will lend 
it, and that at twelve per cent.; so there is a real necessity for 
a double stock for the inland parts, for in his opinion it is the best 
trade in the world, because of the peace made with the Portuguese. 
The Governor desires the adventurers to think over this proposition 
and how to raise a good stock to prosecute the trade, and states his 
intention of calling them together in about a fortnight to hear their 
decision. (25//.) 

A Court of Committees, July 28, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, 
p. 10). 

Philip Mead allowed 61. \y. ^d. for defective calicoes bought of 
the Company. William Shrimpton, executor to the late Lady Dale, 
to be paid 39/., being a third of her adventure of 117/. ; the brokes 
due on the said adventure are ordered to be deducted from the 
next division. Mr. Pryor is paid -^,^1. for drawing up six policies for 
the Company's ships. Edward Knipe delivers up a ring set with 
small diamonds, presented by the ' Vendore de Fazenda ' in Goa to 
President Fremlyn ; it is handed to Mr. Massingberd to be kept 
in the Treasury for the Company. Mr. Governor submits that 
it is time to think about the stock and shipping to be sent to India 
this year ; his opinion is that one ship should be sent to the Coast, 
one to Bantam, and two to Surat, one of the latter to touch at 
Mozambique ; also that a rate should be thought of for those who 
shall be permitted to adventure in the Fourth Joint Stock, as, for 
example, he who would adventure 1,000/. must bring in 1,100/., as 



336 COURT MINUTES, ETC, OF THE 

part of the adventure has already returned home ; these are only 
propositions, which he desires may be considered. Robert Pinchin 
transfers to Richard Clutterbucke 600/. adventure and profits in 
the General Voyage, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees, August 3, 1643 {Court Book, vol. 
xix, p. 11). 

Anthony Panton, minister, who returned in the Crispian, to be 
paid all wages due to him and to receive free of freight two duppers 
of gum-lac and two of tincall. Mr. Governor reports that two men, 
who wish to remain anonymous, have discovered and secured twenty 
bales of indigo landed privately from one of the Company's ships, 
for which service they desire satisfaction ; the Court orders 5/. to 
be given to them, and in the event of this not satisfying them the 
Governor is desired to give them 20^-. more. A warrant is read 
from the Committee of Parliament concerning obstructions in Courts 
of Justice, Mr. Edmund Prideaux, Chairman, summoning some of 
the Company before the said committee on Thursday, the loth 
August, at 2 o'clock, in the Exchequer Chamber, to answer a peti- 
tion exhibited against the Company by William Cobb, a prisoner in 
the King's Bench. The petition is read and the Governor, the 
Deputy, and Messrs. Willson and Kerridge are entreated to be 
present at the hearing of this business. After some dispute con- 
cerning the raising of a competent stock for prosecution of the 
trade, the Court resolves to consult with the committee appointed 
for the Particular Voyage, and orders that its members be sum- 
moned next Friday morning, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees, August 4, 1643 {Court Book, vol. 
xix, p. 12). 

The Deputy, and some Committees are desired to see to the 
disposal of all private trade brought home in the ships, and not to 
permit any indigo, calicoes, black pepper, cinnamon, or tincall to 
be delivered. It is resolved to give 3^. 6d. per lb. for small parcels 
of rich indigo and ^s. 6d. per lb. for small parcels of flat indigo ; 
but those who have brought home any considerable quantity the 
Court will settle with individually. A motion is made that, as 
a large quantity of private trade has been brought home in the 



EAST INDIA COMPANY ^^^ 

three ships lately returned, it would be well for the Court of 
Committees, in vindication of its honour, to declare whether any 
belongs to its members : the Governor, the Deputy, and all the 
Committees present avow by the oath taken to the Company that 
they have no private trade in any of the said three ships, either 
directly or indirectly. Captain Blackwell, the King's grocer, 
acquaints the Court that for many years he and his predecessor 
have received lOo/. every quarter from the Company, but that the 
I go/, due last Midsummer is refused ; he is told that this payment 
ceased when the last book of rates was made, and that no companies 
pay it any longer. The Captain then desires that his son Joshua, 
a lad of seventeen, may be entertained for the Indies ; the Court 
replies that no ship is going out at present, but when any are to 
be dispeeded his request shall be considered. Francis Ashwell and 
Thomas Burton, formerly apprentices to Alderman Ashwell, are 
admitted to the freedom of the Company by service. The re- 
parations to be made at Blackwall are referred to Sir John Gayre, 
Alderman Reynardson, and Captain Styles. Ordered that 5,000/. 
be paid to the owners of the Aleppo Merchant in part of her 
freight ; and that the men in the Crispian be paid their wages. 
Consideration had of the disposal of the goods returned for account 
of the General Voyage, when it is propounded that, if they are 
kept ' in bancke ', some loss might happen because of the danger 
of the times ; if divided, it might prove very prejudicial to what 
is to come, by spoiling the sales. Other courses proposed are : 
to divide the capital, every one taking out his division to be forced 
to ship it away ; that if division is made of any commodity the 
whole of the said commodity should be divided ; that the goods 
would sell better in the Company's than in private hands ; that as 
the goods do not belong to many or to needy men, the general good 
ought to be considered. After much debate it is resolved to call 
a general court of the adventurers in the General Voyage next 
Wednesday afternoon, and then propose a day of sale for goods 
to the value of 30,000/. to pay charges ; if the goods sell for more, 
then to make a division in money rather than in goods ; and if such 
a sale cannot be procured, then to call another meeting for further 
resolution. (2 pp.) 



338 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees, August 9, 1643 {Court Book, vol. 
xix, p. 14) • 

The Court orders 2,000/, to be paid to the Commissioners of 
Customs in advance for the goods returned in the Crispian, Refor- 
mation, and Aleppo Merchant; and that when all the private trade 
in their custody and the King's warehouses is delivered into 
the Company's warehouse, of which the Commissioners' officers 
are to have one key and the Husband the other (the twenty bales 
of indigo pretended to have been seized not included), then the 
remaining 2,000/. due on the said goods is to be paid. Mr. Acton's 
bill of 4/. 'js. lod. to be paid. Mr. Shrimpton, executor to the late 
Lady Dale, demands interest on the 680/. belonging to Her Lady- 
ship's estate and remaining in the Company's hands ; he is told 
that the money was offered to him long ago, and that Lady Dale 
might have had it in her lifetime had she pleased ; that in the 
opinion of Lord Keeper Coventry and Messrs. Samuel Aldersley 
and John Skynner (the two referees), Lady Dale ought not to have 
interest on the said money, and therefore the Court does not think 
fit to pay anything but the principal. Mr. Shrimpton is not satis- 
fied and leaves the court. Mr. Martyn is allowed 20/. for defective 
calicoes. Mr. Deputy relates what passed before Sheriff Langham 
on Saturday afternoon about the twenty bales of indigo lately 
landed at Ralph's Quay, and certain Committees are desired to 
meet and consult about it and endeavour to discover the true 
owners, so that the Company may not be abused, (i p.) 

A General Court of the Adventurers in the First 
General Voyage, August 9, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 16). 

The Governor states that since their last meeting the Ulysses has 
reached Portsmouth with goods for both the Joint Stock and the 
Particular Voyage. He further intimates that by the preamble 
of this Particular Voyage the goods returned are not to be disposed 
of without the consent of the majority of the adventurers ; therefore 
this court has been called to obtain that consent, in order to defray 
the charges, estimated at about 40,000/. ; that the Crispian with 
her stores and provisions belongs to this account and is to be sold. 
The Governor declares that much wrong has been done to the 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 339 

Company by the mariners bringing large quantities of goods for 
their private accounts, which he considers a great abuse and hopes 
that something may be done to prevent the Company being much 
prejudiced in this way. They are called together to agree to the 
goods being sold ; those that will not sell can either be kept in 
' bancke ' or divided ; as regards price, it is supposed that this had 
better be referred to the eight Committees formerly appointed and 
the Standing Committee. This opinion is seconded, as it is thought 
that money will be better to divide than goods, and the disposal of 
the goods not sold can be arranged at another meeting. The 
Governor then puts it to the question and by erection of hands 
it is resolved to sell all the goods returned for the account of this 
Particular Voyage by the candle, and to refer the sale and manage- 
ment of all to the Standing Committee and the eight Committees 
formerly appointed. The court of sales is to be held this day sen- 
night in the aternoon, and all goods not sold are not to be disposed 
of without the consent of those now present. (i|//.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
August ii, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 18), 

Philip Mead buys Surat * narrowes ', ' Broaderas ', and broad 
baftas, agreeing to pay for them at four six months from July last. 
James Martyn buys calicoes. Nicholas Bowden, chirurgeon of the 
Crispian, to be paid all wages due to him ; and the sailors in the 
Reformation to receive their pay. Mr. Shrimpton again appears 
in court and desires to be paid the 685/. \sic\ which has been in 
the Company's hands for twelve years, with some reasonable 
consideration for the time it has been detained : after some debate 
the Court resolves to pay the said sum with 200/. for its ' forbear- 
ance ', and to remit 41/. 95. due for brokes on Lady Dale's ad- 
venture, on Mr. Shrimpton giving a sufficient discharge. The 
Committees appointed for the Particular Voyage being present, 
they and the Court agree upon prices for most of the goods returned 
in the Crispian and Aleppo Merchant, the remainder being left for 
consideration at the next meeting. Fotherby is directed to make 
an inventory of the stores and provisions returned in the Crispian, 
and on its completion Sir John Gayre, Alderman Reynardson, 

z 2 



340 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Mr. Deputy, and Captain Styles (for the Third [sic] Joint Stock), 
Messrs. Nathan Wright, John Smith, James Mann, and Thomas 
Rich (for the Particular Voyage), or any four of them, two from 
each Stock, are desired, with the advice of some able seamen 
and shipwrights, to value the Crispian, her stores and provisions. 

(i|/A) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
August t6, 1643 {Court Booky vol. xix, p. 20). 

A letter is read from Mr. Whitaker of Amsterdam satisfying the 
Court as to the justness of the debt of 200/. delivered to Mr. Holford 
for the Company, and that there was no underhand dealing. The 
Court resolves that Mr. Whitaker shall be paid the 50/. gratuity 
formerly allotted him, and Mr. Bowen is directed to acquaint him 
with this and desire him to let the Court know where Holford 
is, and whether there is any hope of procuring part of the said 200/, 
from him, and to endeavour to recover what he can. The Governor 
reports that the Commissioners of Customs have sent a young man 
to receive the 4,000/. formerly promised by the Company in part 
payment of custom due on the goods returned in the three ships 
lately come from the Indies, and that the messenger desires to be 
excused from giving any acquittance for the money. After some 
dispute it is resolved that what money is given shall be in discharge 
of the subsidy due for goods returned in the Crispian, Reformation^ 
and Aleppo Merchant, and that none shall be paid without an 
acquittance. The bill of exchange charged upon the Company by 
Thomas Cramporne of Plymouth, for payment of 20/. to Michael 
Herring, which he paid for the Ulysses putting into Plymouth, 
is ordered to be paid. The Governor desires to know the Court's 
pleasure with regard to sending the 360 bags of pepper to Leghorn 
and Genoa, and acquaints the Committees that the master of the 
Paraxon, sent by Sir Henry Garway, is waiting without ; also that 
the Sampson and other ships bound for those parts are ready to 
take in any goods. Thereupon it is resolved that, if the said pepper 
does not sell in the afternoon, it shall be dispatched in one of the 
ships, and the master of the Paragon is told to come next Friday 
for a final answer. In the Court's opinion the Sampson is the 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 341 

fittest ship. The Court being satisfied that there is an error in the 
bill of lading of the Aleppo Merchant, the men in the said ship are 
to be cleared. (i|//.) 

A General Court of Sales, August 16, 1643 {Court Book, 
vol. xix, p. 22). 

Sale of pintado quilts, Legee silk, green ginger, cotton yarn, and 
olibanum, with prices and names of purchasers. The Court orders 
that if any of the goods sold are transported, the half subsidy is 
to be reserved for the Company's benefit, and that the time of 
payment for all goods is to begin from St. Bartholomew's day. 
(I /•) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
August 18, 1643 {Court Book,vo\. xix, p. 23). 

After some dispute a warrant is ordered to be made out for 
payment of 4,000/. to the Commissioners of Customs in part payment 
of custom due for goods returned in the Crispian, Reformation, and 
Aleppo Merchant, no receipt to be demanded ; 2,000/. of the said 
sum to be paid for the account of the Joint Stock and 2,000/. for 
that of the Particular Voyage. Ashly, master of the Sampson, and 
Harris, master of the Paragon, are asked what freight they expect 
for the pepper intended to be dispatched to Leghorn and Genoa. 
They both demand 2^ rials per bag, and are told that they shall 
receive the Court's answer on the Exchange. Messrs. Willson and 
Bateman are desired to treat with the master of the Sampson and 
to agree with him at the best rate possible. The Governor claims 
to have thought of a way to please both the Joint Stock and the 
Particular Voyage in the disposal of the pepper, and proposes that, 
in order to prevent two sellers being in the market to the prejudice 
of each other, the Particular Voyage should [sell its 1,600 bags 
of pepper to the Joint Stock at \6d. per lb. at five six months, 
the latter to have the benefit of the id. per lb. to be returned. 
This causes some debate, and finally several Committees on behalf 
of the Fourth Joint Stock, and others on behalf of the Particular 
Voyage withdraw, by request, to consider. After some time they 
return and report their approval of the proposition and desire that 
it be put before the general court in the afternoon. For disposal 



342 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

of the other goods, the Court resolves to make a division of 120/. 
per cent., viz. : of 50 per cent, in rich indigo at 6s. Sd. per lb., of 25 
per cent, in ' Cirques ' [Sarkhej] indigo at 4^-. Sd. per lb. , of 25 per cent, 
in calicoes at 2| for one, and of 20 per cent, in cinnamon at 3^. per lb. 
as it is ; and if there is any lack of these commodities then every 
man is to have his proportion in cloves at 4^-. per lb., the exporter 
of the goods to receive the half subsidy. The Governor is entreated 
to acquaint the general court with the above resolution this 
afternoon. Philip Mead allowed 40s. for damaged calicoes. The 
said Mead buys 593 pieces of calicoes at an abatement of 14^. on 
every piece, agreeing to pay for them at four six months from the 
24th of August. (2 pp.) 

A General Court for the Particular Voyage, August 
18, 1643 (Court Book, vol. xix, p. 25). 

The Governor acquaints the Court that since the last meeting 
a court of sales has been held, at which the value of the goods 
sold did not amount to above 4,000/. ; therefore they are called 
together to consider concerning the disposal of the remainder, 
whether to keep them in bulk for a better time, to sell them, to 
ship them for their own account, or to divide them ; he does not 
think they will sell, but desires to hear the opinion of the generality 
on the subject. All are silent, and the Governor is desired to inform 
the Court of the proposition that the pepper belonging to the 
Particular Voyage should be sold to the Joint Stock, and that 
it is also thought advisable by the Standing and Mixed Committees 
that the indigo, calicoes, and cinnamon be proportionably divided 
among the adventurers. This being put to the question is unani- 
mously agreed to, and the rates for each commodity referred to 
the Standing and Mixed Committees, together with the prices and 
sale of all other goods, and ships, and all other matters concerning 
the Particular Voyage. (i^/A) 

A Court of Committees, August 23, 1643 {Court Book, vol. 
xix, p. 26). 

Mr. Deputy reports that the Commissioners of Customs refuse 
to permit the Company to take up its goods at the waterside, 
because they have not received the 4,000/. promised to them ; 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 343 

he therefore desires the Court to resolve on this matter. After 
much debate and the delivery of many opinions, among them one 
that if the said money is paid in the manner proposed it might 
be demanded again and the Company forced to pay twice, as the 
King has written several letters to the Company telling it to retain 
the customs due in satisfaction of the money owing for the pepper 
bought by Lord Cottington, the Court considers that the goods 
cannot be received and warehoused without the Company complies 
with the ordinance of Parliament ^ and the demands of the Com- 
missioners of Customs as all other merchants do, therefore orders 
the 4,000/. to be paid, and desires Mr. Rilston and those who tender 
the said sum to the Commissioners to make an attestation of what 
passes at the time between Alderman Fowke and themselves. The 
guns in the Crispian and Reformation are to be landed at Blackwall 
Yard and, to prevent their weight injuring the wharf and docks, 
Boatswain Ingram is directed to have them placed on timber in 
the most convenient part of the Yard ; the powder and shot 
belonging to the said ships is also to be taken ashore at Blackwall 
and housed there as formerly. John Phillips's petition to be 
employed as porter at the calico warehouse in the place of the 
late John Fernell is referred to Mr. Bowen, A motion is made 
that consideration be had how to prosecute the Company's trade 
for the future, as it is quite time to think about the provision of 
rials and goods for the next shipping. This motion is seconded by 
the Deputy, who has conferred with Mr, Baker, the late President 
at Bantam, now returned home, who avers that if cloth is not 
procured from the Coast there is no pepper to be had at Jambi 
upon reasonable terms ; therefore a ship for the Coast must of 
necessity be sent out towards the end of October or the beginning 
of November at the latest for this purpose. This reminds the 
Court of what has to be proposed to the adventurers in the Fourth 
Joint Stock in the afternoon, which is, whether they will consent to 
buy the pepper belonging to the Particular Voyage at the price 
and time previously stated ; and to impress upon them the necessity 
of considering how the trade is to be followed next year. This 

' On August 22 the House of Commons ordered 'that the East India Company do 
forthwith pay in the whole customs upon their goods now imported, according to the 
ordinance '. 



344 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

latter point it is resolved to debate upon now, in preparation for 
the afternoon court. Thereupon it is submitted that some means 
should be thought of to increase the Joint Stocky which might be 
done if all in the Fourth Joint Stock would bring in twenty or 
thirty per cent, and so keep the trade to themselves ; to this end 
a book of subscription should be issued for those who are already 
adventurers to underwrite their additions. To this it is answered 
that some will do so, but others cannot. Another opinion is for 
a reasonable rate to be agreed upon and the trade to be open 
for all free of the Company to come in at pleasure, and to permit 
those who are not free but desire to adventure to do so on under- 
writing for 500/. and paying 5/. for admission to the freedom of the 
Company, This latter opinion is generally approved, as it is 
necessary to bring in more money. Those who do not wish to 
enlarge their subscription are to be accounted adventurers only for 
so much as they have paid in and no compulsion to be used. A 
dispute arises concerning the valuation of the Stock, some thinking 
10/. per cent., others 12/. 10s., and others 15/. per cent, to be an 
indifferent valuation ; the better to decide this, the Governor, the 
Deputy, and certain Committees are entreated to view and report 
on the estate of the Fourth Joint Stock with all convenient speed. 
Henry Borneford, a factor who returned in the Crispian, to be paid 
all wages and debts due unto him. Henry Hall, the Company's 
anchor smith, allowed \2d. extraordinary for every hundredweight 
of work done to the three ships now on the stocks, the price of coal 
having been and still remaining very high ; the same allowance 
is also granted to the smiths making the iron hoops. Giles 
Sheppheard petitions that his salary, which eight years ago was 
reduced from 20/. to 20 marks per annum, may be increased, or 
some gratification given him on account of his constant attendance 
and poverty ; by general consent he is given 5/. Mr. Fotherby is 
directed to agree with Anne Bullock to board and lodge Black 
John, who came in the Reformation, as cheaply as possible, and 
to employ him at the Yard at wages fitting for his maintenance 
until the departure of the next ships for India. Steevens to receive 
the thirty-four loads of timber and knees bought from Owen 
Wakeford and to buy certain other timber. (3 pp.) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 345 

A General Court of the Adventurers in the Fourth 
Joint Stock, August 33, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 39). 

Mr. Governor acquaints those present that they have been called 
together to be informed of the offer made by the adventurers in 
the General Voyage to sell their pepper, about 1,700 bags, at a 
reasonable rate to the Fourth Joint Stock ; also for the considera- 
tion of some fitting course for raising a new stock for the main- 
tenance of the trade and for its prosecution next year. In answer 
to the first proposition one of the Committees observes that the 
quantity of pepper owned by the Joint Stock is greater than that 
owned by the ' Voyage ', and that not only the Governor and 
Court of Committees but the Committees appointed for both 
Stocks, or the major part of them, have debated this proposition 
and unanimously approve of the Fourth Joint Stock buying the 
pepper belonging to the Particular Voyage at 16^. per lb. at five 
six months, the buyer to have the half subsidy returned. One 
of the generality observes that the Fourth Joint Stock ' is 76,000/. 
and the adventure borne' and looks for as fair a return as the 
' Voyage ' had or could expect ; it has more ships abroad to bring 
home the returns, and its pepper is as valuable to its adventurers 
as the pepper belonging to the Particular Voyage is to those 
adventuring therein ; therefore he for his part would offer the 
Fourth Joint Stock's pepper to the adventurers in the Particular 
Voyage at i^\d. per lb. at the same time. Finally, after much 
debate the Governor puts it to the question to the adventurers 
in the Fourth Joint Stock (the Committees being desired not to 
hold up their hands) whether they will buy the pepper belonging 
to the Particular Voyage, and the answer clearly appears to be in 
the negative. The Governor then proceeds to the next proposition, 
and observes that the time is drawing near for the provision of 
ships, rials, and other things for the ensuing year. The general 
opinion is to keep the Old Stock on foot, either by the supply of the 
present adventurers or the admission of others at a stipulated rate, 
but to this some aver that the adventurers cannot do it, some 
being dead, others unable, while others are unwilling ; therefore 
a valuation had better be made of its present estate to discover how 
it stands. Mr. Deputy opines that it is high time to consider about 



34<5 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

the ships to be dispeeded, for if it is not forthwith resolved to send 
one to the Coast, farewell may be said to the Bantam trade. 
Besides this, a ship must be sent to Bantam, one to Surat, one 
to Cochin, and a pinnace to touch at Mozambique on her way 
to Surat, and for these five vessels a competent stock must be pro- 
vided. The Governor again desires the generality to take into 
consideration how a stock may be raised, and to declare their 
resolutions at the court appointed to be held next Thursday 
sennight in the afternoon, when all free of the Company are to be 
summoned to appear. Meanwhile it is thought fit to examine the 
state of the Joint Stock that a valuation may be made of it, the 
whole court being of opinion that the present adventurers ought to 
have the precedence in bringing in money if they please and so 
reap the benefit of the trade before others. (2^ pp.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
August 25, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 32). 

An order from the ' Commons house of Parlyament ', dated 
yesterday '^, concerning the payment of money due upon goods and 
merchandise lately imported by the Company, is read, and 2,000/. 
(besides the former 4,000/.) ordered to be paid forthwith to the 
Commissioners by way of advance according to the said order. 
Messrs. Trenchard and Rose, members of the House of Commons, 
report that Sir Peter Rychaut has come under the order of seques- 
tration, whereby his estate is forfeited to the Commonwealth, and 
that by virtue of an order made in the House they have come 
to demand the dividend now to be assigned to him as an adven. 
turer in the Company ; they are told that the indigo is not yet 
sifted or the calicoes sorted, but when a division is made notice 
shall be given to them. Consideration is then had of the division 
formerly proposed, and 1 25 per cent, is allotted to every adven- 
turer in this Particular Voyage, viz. 50 per cent, upon rich indigo, 
25 per cent, upon ' Cirques ' indigo, 30 per cent, upon calicoes, and 

* See Commons' Journals, vol. iii, p. 217. The Commissioners referred to are the 
• Commissioners of the Customs '. 

A petition from the Company (to which no reference is made in the minutes) was read 
in the House on August 26, and referred to the Committee for the Navy for disposal. 
In it the Company applied for permission to ' take up ' the goods brought in the Ulysses, 
and to be allowed to export part of their stock. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 347 

20 per cent, upon cinnamon. This is agreed to ; and it is next 
debated what to do with the pepper, the proposition to sell it to 
the Joint Stock having been opposed. After some dispute it is 
generally agreed to ship it out, unless six or eight good men 
desire to buy the whole quantity and discount their money, in 
which case it can be sold to them. Notwithstanding this de- 
claration of general opinion, the Court, in conformity with the 
order of the general court, desires several Committees for the 
Joint Stock, and several others for the Particular Voyage, to con- 
sult as to the best course for disposal of the pepper for both 
accounts. Accordingly they withdraw, and after some time return 
and report as their opinion that it would be best to ship the pepper, 
and they desire that a general court may be called to give them 
full power either to do so or to sell it. Meanwhile, the Court orders 
the pepper belonging to both Stocks to be sifted and prepared for 
shipping, and names the Mary, Freeman, and Northumberland 
as ships fitting to send it in, but does not resolve on the freight. 
Mary, widow of Nicholas Reynolds, who was drowned at the Custom- 
house Quay, is given 4.0s. ; and a like sum is bestowed upon Richard 
Saxton, a labourer who was dangerously wounded in the Crispian. 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
August 31, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 34). 

An order is read from the Upper House of Parliament, dated the 
24th instant,^ grounded on the petition of Rose Fuller, who pre- 
tends that some of her husband's estate is detained by the Company ; 
the order declares that if the money claimed is not paid or cause 
shown to the contrary, Their Lordships will order payment. Here- 
upon the Governor and others are entreated to attend upon Their 
Lordships next Thursday at ten o'clock to answer this petition. 
Mr. Governor intimates that this afternoon a general court of all those 
free of the Company is to be held, and desires to know what is to be 
put before it ; it is resolved to ask the adventurers in the Particular 
Voyage to consent to the shipping for Leghorn and Genoa of all their 

^ See Lords' Journals, vol. vi, p. 194, and Fourth Report of the Hist. MSS. Commission, 
p. 103. On hearing the Company's explanations, the Lords dismissed the application 
(p. 208). 



348 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

pepper, there being no likelihood of its sale here ; to ask the adven- 
turers in the Fourth Joint Stock to consent to a like quantity of their 
pepper being shipped to those parts upon their account, the proceeds 
to be equally divided and shared ; and to inquire how they think to 
maintain and continue the trade this year. Motion made for all 
remains in India belonging to the Particular Voyage to be turned 
over to the Joint Stock at a rate to be agreed upon, but on this 
being put to the question it is opposed by all but two. The 
Governor sets forth the necessity of sending to India this year three 
ships and a pinnace, and of increasing the stock, which he thinks can 
only be done and men be invited to come in by valuing the Fourth 
Joint Stock and adding to it, or by issuing a book for a new sub- 
scription. To this the court agrees, and desires him to inform the 
generality of the same in the afternoon and to take their resolutions 
in all the particulars mentioned. Mr. Bailey, master of the Re- 
formation, to have his cinnamon delivered to him, and for its 
freight to pay the Company at the rate of 9^. per lb. Mr. Willson, 
master of the Ulysses, to be given 4,500/, in part payment of his 
freight. Several masters of ships offer to carry the Company's 
pepper to Leghorn and Genoa ; among them Tutchen, master of 
the Anthony Bonadveiiture, burden 350 tons, carrying twenty-eight 
guns and fifty men, who demands two dollars per bag freight; 
Martyn, master of the Mary, offers to serve as cheaply as any man ; 
Hide, master of the Freeman, refers himself freely both as regards 
the quantity of pepper and freight ; the Paragon, a ship of Sir 
Henry Garway's, her master Leonard Harris, is also proposed, but 
rejected on account of age. Nothing is resolved, but the masters 
of the three first-named ships are told to come for a final answer 
to-morrow morning. (2 //,) 

A General Court of all free of the Company, 
August 31, 1643 [Court Book, vol. xix, p. 37), 

Mr, Governor intimates that the business to be considered is the 
disposal of the pepper belonging respectively to the Particular 
Voyage and to the Fourth Joint Stock, and the raising of a stock 
for prosecution of the trade. As to the pepper belonging to the 
Particular Voyage, it is resolved by the adventurers concerned that 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 349 

full power shall be given to the sixteen Committees formerly nomi- 
nated to settle this matter, or the major part of them, to sell 
or ship it for Leghorn and Genoa, The adventurers in the Fourth 
Joint Stock likewise resolve to give leave to the Standing Court of 
Committees to ship a like quantity of their pepper with that 
belonging to the Particular Voyage, the money received for it 
all to be equally divided between both stocks. The Governor 
now draws attention to the third and most important matter, 
the raising of a stock, which must be resolved on, as the time 
is drawing near and the charge of the factors in India will be as 
great with a small stock as with a large, for they write that they 
could do ten times as much business at the same cost. He con- 
ceives that a stock could be raised either by making an addition 
to the Joint Stock, by turning the remains of the Voyage into the 
Joint Stock, or by permitting all men to come in as adventurers. 
One of the Standing Committees observes that a valuation of the 
Fourth Joint Stock should be made ; to which it is answered that 
that Stock is only 76,000/., yet 120,000/. was sent out, and when 
a division is made it should be made upon that 76,000/. ; as 54,000 
rials of eight are returned to England for the account of the Joint 
Stock, in his opinion it is to be valued, as it shall be sold for ready 
money, for the account of the proprietors, who when their debts are 
paid ought to divide the rest. These debts were formerly 36,000/., 
but now do not amount to above 22.000/., and if the Joint Stock is 
to be valued he desires that the remains of the Particular Voyage 
may be also. The Governor demanding the opinion of the whole 
court as to whether the remains of the Voyage shall be valued and 
added to the Joint Stock, this motion is generally discouraged, an 
adventurer in the Voyage observing that if the remains were valued 
it ' would not fill the purse nor doe the worke intended '. By 
desire, the Governor then puts the same question to the adventurers 
in the Voyage and they answer in the negative. Again by desire, 
the Governor asks as many as arc adventurers in the Fourth Joint 
Stock, who think fit for the advancement of the same and of the 
trade that an indifferent valuation be made of its state to attract 
more adventurers, to hold up their hands, whereupon all do so, 
except Sir Henry Garway and Mr. John Holloway, who refuse 
to have anything to do with it. Mr. Governor then requesting the 



350 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

adventurers in the Old Stock to nominate ten, fifteen, or twenty 
among themselves to make the proposed valuation, he is named 
with fourteen Committees, (2|//.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
September i, 1643 [Court Book, vol. xix, p. 40). 

The Governor and Thomas Burnell accepted as securities for 
Legee silk bought by the former. Agreements made with Captain 
Leonard Harris, master of the Paragon, to take 300 bags of pepper 
to Genoa at two dollars per bag freight ; with Roger Martyn, 
master of the Mary, to carry 800 bags of pepper to Leghorn at the 
same rate ; with Anthony Tutchen, master of the Anthony Bonad- 
venture, to carry 400 bags of pepper to Genoa and 500 bags 
to Leghorn at the same rate ; and with Captain John Hide, master 
of the Freeman, to carry 1,200 bags of pepper, or the remainder of 
what is to be sent to those parts, to Leghorn at the same rate. All 
the said masters are enjoined to sail together from the Downs, and 
the Court orders that if it is resolved to send any of the said pepper 
to Venice, one dollar per bag shall be given for its freight thither 
from Leghorn. A warrant is read from Messrs. William Vaughan 
and William Pitchford, dated the 29th of August and directed 
to William Ford and John Prowd, for sequestering the estate in the 
Company's hands of Sir Thomas Hamersley for the use of the 
Commonwealth. Ford, who presented the warrant, is told that 
something may shortly be divided upon Sir Thomas's adventure 
proportionably with others, but what is not yet agreed upon, and 
nothing shall be parted with until the sequestrators are informed. 
Francis Lawrence and William Ragdale, officers from Haberdashers' 
Hall, demand, by virtue of a warrant directed to them by Miles 
Corbett \ grounded upon an ordinance of Parliament, the estate 
of Charles Coxe, an adventurer in the Company ; they are told 
that Mr. Coxe is an adventurer in the Fourth Joint Stock, and that 
it is uncertain when a division will be made to him, as that Stock is 
much indebted and must first pay its debts. Mr. Blunt is to be 
allowed 14 lb. tare on every hundredweight of cinnamon he 
delivers out. (li/A) 

* M.P. for Great Yarmouth, and a member of the Committee for Compounding. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 351 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
September 6, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 41). 

The offer of Hooker, a grocer, to buy six chests of sugar, is 
referred to Mr. Blunt. The Governor presents several warrants 
from the Lords and Commons sitting at Haberdashers' Hall for 
advance of money, and also from the Committee sitting at Cambden 
House, Maiden Lane, not only for the sequestration of divisions 
now due to adventurers in the Particular Voyage, but also abso- 
lutely prohibiting the delivery of any goods to any adventurer 
before some of the Company have appeared before the said 
Committee. Thereupon the Court resolves to meet at three o'clock 
and in a body attend the Lords and Commons at Haberdashers' 
Hall and tell them how destructive these warrants may be to the 
trade, and how they will discourage any from underwriting in the 
new book of subscriptions shortly to be issued by the Company for 
the prosecution of the trade this year. Mr. Mead buys 1,600 pieces 
of Synda and ' Broadera ' calicoes at four six months from the 
10th of September. The Court resolves to buy rich indigo from 
mariners and others who have brought home as private trade not 
more than five hundredweight, at the rate of 3^-. id. per lb., and 
Cirques indigo at is. id. per lb., free of freight and custom, and to 
deal individually with those who have brought home larger quan- 
tities ; and Mr. Blunt is directed to provide a warehouse near at 
hand to house it. The tincall to be delivered to its owners on 
payment of 6d. per lb. freight. Mr. Budd reports that after con- 
sideration of the anonymous letter telling of a large quantity of 
indigo brought home as private trade and other abuses committed 
in the Crispiana, he is of opinion that the only way to discover the 
truth is to bring an action against one or two of the mariners, in 
which he can so frame the ' libell ' that the truth will appear. To 
this the Court consents and desires him to proceed accordingly. 
Mr. Budd's fees of ll. 10s. ']d., for the suit in the Admiralty against 
Cobb, are ordered to be paid. John Southam buys the hull and 
four masts of the Reformation for 360/., 140/. to be paid 'in hand ', 
the rest at six months. {1 pp.) 



^52 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
September 8, 1643 {Cotirt Book, vol. xix, p. 43). 

Susan Walker, sister to Robert Wooder, is given 40^-. from the 
poor-box, and Rose, widow of Robert Fuller, ^os. Captain Leonard 
Harris is ordered to ship the 300 bags of pepper to be carried in 
the Paragon to Genoa at once, and Sir Henry Garway engages 
that if the said ship is not ready to leave the Downs with the 
Sampson she shall stay and accompany the Freeman, Mary, and 
Anthony Bonadventnre. John Day buys all the Company's carda- 
moms at 18^. per hundred ready money, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
September 13, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 44), 

Mr. Dawes, an officer of the Customs, is given 5/. for discovering 
the indigo landed at Ralph's Quay. Others at the Custom-house 
having rendered good service by discovering private trade, &c., are 
given 30/., to be bestowed at the discretion of the Governor and 
Deputy. The adventure of John Cufife to be transferred to William 
Boothby, who has taken out letters of administration as a creditor, 
on Boothby giving a bond to save the Company harmless. Canvas 
to be provided for the ships to be dispeeded this year ; also oxen 
and hogs. Messrs. Martyn, Hide, Tutchen, and Harris appearing in 
answer to a summons, the three first agree to set sail for Gravesend 
within twenty days and to keep company from the Downs to their 
several ports ; and Harris promises to do so, if he does not depart 
with the Sampson beforehand. Measures to be taken to settle the 
tares of indigo. Mr. Deputy and two others desired to treat with 
Mr. Millett, master of the Aleppo Merchant, about the stores he 
spared the Company at Surat. The Governor reports that he and 
several Committees have valued the estate of the Fourth Joint 
Stock, and find that it will yield twenty per cent, profit ; after 
reading the particulars and desiring the opinion of the Court, he 
puts it to the question, when the said valuation is generally agreed 
to be ' most equal ', and to confirm it a general court is summoned 
for next Wednesday afternoon. (3 //.) 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 353 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
September 15, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 47). 

Sir John Wollaston, alderman, transfers to Sir Jacob Garrad, 
alderman, 800/. adventure in the General Voyage of the Company 
with all profits. The masters and mates who came home in the 
Crispian and Reformation, also John Stallon, mate in the Aleppo 
Merchant, to be paid all wages and debts due to them. A chest 
containing silk stuffs and white cloth belonging to Mary Husbands, 
sister to Samuel Husbands (lately returned from Bantam), to be 
delivered free of freight ; also two chests containing damasks, 
satins, and other stuffs returned in the Reformation belonging to 
Richard Wootton and Mary, widow of George Muschampe. The 
following resolutions are made concerning those indebted to the 
Company for more than two months. Edward Abbott, who owes 
219/. OS. Ofd., is to be given credit by Sambrooke for all divisions 
due upon his account, which will satisfy most of his debt. For 
Captain Carleton's debt of 627/. 17^. 9^., his dividend of silk is to 
be kept in part satisfaction. Spiller is directed to inform John 
Gearing, Giles Pooley, Nicholas Backhouse, Pedwarden Rumsey, 
William Garway, and Robert Stones, who are all indebted to the 
Company, that if they do not pay the Court is resolved to take 
action against them. Stephen Bolton, who is indebted 760/., and 
Stephen Burton, who owes 13,898/, iis. id., are to be told the 
same ; and Richard Wallcott, who owes 165/. \s. ()d., it is thought 
will see it settled if he is spoken to once more. As for John 
Holloway, who owes 3,652/. 95-, lod. and has forty-two bales of 
Persia silk in the Company's warehouse as security, Mr. Acton is 
directed to take the advice of Serjeant Pheasant how to recover this 
sum. Isaac Van Payne's account is to be revised. As regards 
Nicholas Gerrard, who owes 285/. 13^-. 3^., the Court has formerly 
ordered that he should be credited with what was due to him, 
he promising to pay the rest, 50/. down and 50/. every six weeks 
after ; Mr. Sambrook is now instructed to perfect his account, 
and to inform him that if he does not keep his promise proceedings 
will be taken. John Day, who bought all the cardamoms, is given 
2lb. of the same for every bale sold. (2^ pp.) 



A a 



354 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
September 20, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 50). 

The request of Mr. Borneford for some gratification for two 
years' service beyond his covenanted time is denied, as he received 
1 20/. per annum during the said time, and this is thought sufficient. 
The coopers appear to answer complaints against their casks. The 
Court is inclined to make them pay for the defective casks supplied, 
but nothing is resolved ; only they are ordered to make the casks 
in future according to Steevens's directions. The pipestaves for 
sale belonging to the King to be examined, and if found serviceable 
to be bought. Temperance, widow of the late John Tyndall, to 
receive 3/. on account of her husband's wages ; and Margaret, 
widow of Edward Bridges, to receive 5/. on account of her husband's 
wages. William Cobb, imprisoned in the King's Bench at the 
Company's suit for piracy in the Red Sea, petitions for release and 
to be allowed to make his defence to the charges brought against 
him ; the person presenting the petition is told that a libel in the 
Court of Admiralty was presented against Cobb, who could if he 
pleased have put in his answer last term, but now he must await 
the next term ; for his release he is referred to the Court of 
Admiralty. A list of the employments allotted to the several 
Committees is read. (4 //.) 

A General Court, September 20, 1643 {Court Book, vo\.k\x, 
P- 54). 

The Governor intimates that they have assembled to consider 
the valuation of the Fourth Joint Stock, that the Committees 
appointed for this business have met several times and examined 
all particulars concerning it, and at their last meeting (when eleven 
or twelve were present) they concluded upon a valuation of twenty 
per cent, profit ; the said Stock being formerly 76,000/., they have 
now valued it at 91,000/.; to which all, except Sir Henry Garway 
and Mr. Holloway, agreed. This valuation was submitted to the 
Court of Committees and approved, except by the two men named 
above, and now it is for the generality either to approve of or alter 
it ; in his opinion it is a very just one. A Committee remarks that 
there need be no dispute about it, as it has already been referred to 



EAST INDIA COMPANY s55 

so many. The Deputy also avers that the endeavour of the 
Company is to raise as much stock as will continue the trade, and 
in his opinion the valuation is very just and equal. Notwithstanding 
all this, Sir Henry Garway makes some opposition to the valuation, 
conceiving it to be far undervalued, and a motion is made to see 
what it would fetch by the candle. But after some dispute the 
Governor puts it to the question whether the Court will confirm 
this valuation, and it does so, the two men beforenamed alone 
dissenting. The Governor then says that a preamble shall be 
drawn up and a book prepared for every one to underwrite in what 
he pleases as an addition to the Fourth Joint Stock, and that 
a day shall be limited for doing so. (i^ //.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
September 23, 1643 (Court Book, vol. xix, p. 5^). 

Applications to be invited for the post of master in the small 
ship intended for the Coast. It is resolved to send the largest 
vessel now being built to Bantam, and the Crispian and the other 
ship now building to Surat. Weal, who made some of the defective 
casks, is ordered to make good the damage or else to be dismissed 
the Company's service ; and the steward and his mate in every 
ship to be directed to keep an account of ' all defective cask ' in their 
ships with its mark, that satisfaction for it may be received from 
the coopers. The master of the Aleppo Merchant to be paid all 
freight due to that ship. An order from the House of Commons of 
the 22nd instant is read,^ promising that when it is understood 
what is desired, that which is just and for the public good shall be 
done. Hereupon the Court directs that a petition be drawn up to 

^ On September 22 the Commons resolved that the East India Company should be 
' spared for payment of the 4,000/. or thereabouts for the goods already shipped by the 
Joint Stock of the Company to be transported', but should forthwith pay all customs 
due on imports. The Governor and others were then called in and ac(iuainted with 
these decisions, whereupon they desired a little time to make the payment ordered, and 
further complained that the Commissioners of Customs had not paid certain sums due as 
drawback. In reply, the House promised redress of this grievance, but insisted on 
immediate payment of the customs due, as the needs of the Navy were urgent. The 
Speaker went on to say that the members ' like very well of your setting forth of a fleet 
the next year; and when they shall understand what you desire of this House that may 
advance that service, they shall do that as shall be according to justice and the good of 
the publick, regard being had of their good services.' 

A a 2 



35^ COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

declare the Company's discouragements, and that, if these were 
withdrawn, an addition to the Fourth Joint Stock might be 
expected. The Deputy and several Committees are entreated to 
meet on Monday morning to compose the said petition ; and, when 
it is drawn up, to take the advice of the Recorder and Mr. Maynard. 
Hugh Forth desires to receive Robert Gardiner's warrants for 
divisions ; he is told that Gardiner's adventure has been sequestered 
by Parliament, and therefore, before any of it can be given up, the 
Committee for Sequestrations must be satisfied and their warrant 
obtained. Aaron Baker to be paid all wages and debts due to 
him. Gilbert Keate buys nineteen chests of the Crispiaiis sugar at 
48^-. per hundred at six months. (i| pp.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
September 30, 1643 (Court Book, vol. xix, p. 57). 

The request of Captain John Hall for allowance for defective 
cinnamon is denied ; and his further request that some ropes which 
he brought from Holland and some powder may be taken in part 
payment for the said cinnamon is referred to Sir John Gayre and 
Captain Styles. Stephen Burton and Richard Piggott appear in 
answer to a summons concerning a debt of 13,898/, 12^. 2d. owing 
by them and others to the Company ; they excuse themselves, 
saying they have paid in their several shares, and lay the blame 
upon Sir Nicholas and Samuel Crispe, Captain Carleton, and 
Thomas Fownes ; the Court advises them to take some course 
to satisfy the Company, and orders Spiller to warn by the next 
court all who have signed the said bills, especially Samuel Crispe. 
A warrant to be made out for payment of 280/. to Mr. Lewellyn 
for twenty bales of indigo lately seized by Mr. Dawes and for 
which a writ of replevin was brought, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
October 4, 1643 [Court Book, vol. xix, p. 58). 

Spiller is ordered to summon Mr. Samuel Crispe to appear next 
Friday, and if he does not, then to put one of the bills in which he 
stands bound to the Company in suit. As the small ship designed 
for the Coast will be ready to be launched within a fortnight, the 
Court orders provisions to be supplied for her sufficient for eighteen 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 357 

months, and that she shall carry forty men. Robert Bowen is 
entertained as her master at 6/. per month, with an allowance of one 
hundred marks ' to carry forth with him ', on condition that he does 
not trade in any of the Company's commodities on his outward or 
homeward voyage, or from port to port, or for a greater sum than 
the said allowance, and that before departing he gives a list of the 
goods he intends to buy either to the Governor or to the Deputy. 
Bowen agrees to leave 300/. or 300/. in the Company's hands, for 
which he is to be allowed fifty per cent, profit on the return of 
the ship to be sent to Bantam. If the said ship miscarries, then 
principal and profit shall belong to the Company, and Bowen 
receive no benefit ; but if she shall arrive safely at Erith, on her 
discharge he shall be allowed at the rate of seven per cent, per 
annum. He also consents to spend two years in India after his 
arrival on the Coast, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
October 6, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 60). 

Captain Goodlad presents a petition which he had proffered 
to Parliament concerning the payment of his sixteenth part of 
the ship Peter and Andrew (now called the DolpJmi) bought by 
the Company from Sir Peter Rychaut. Under this petition 
appears a reference, signed by Mr. Trenchard, that Captain Goodlad 
ought to receive this sum, as it is involved in the bill of 1,300/. 
owing by the Company to Sir Peter for the said ship and her 
provisions ; whereupon the Court orders Captain Goodlad to be 
given 60/. in part payment, on his signing a bond to save the Com- 
pany harmless. John Holloway is given a warrant for his division 
of cloves, amounting to 2,460/., which he intends to assign to the 
Company in part satisfaction of his debt of 3,600/. ; there are like- 
wise forty-two bales of his silk held as security for the said debt. 
At the request of Mr. Millett, master of the Aleppo Merchant, the 
Court detains 1,500/. due to him for freight for six months, agreeing 
to allow him six per cent, for it, and orders the money for his indigo 
to be paid. A dispute arises as to the consignment of that part of 
the pepper shipped for Leghorn, some thinking that it should be 
consigned to Mr. Throgmorton and his house, others that some of 
it should be sent to the two Mr. Manns and their family ; no 



358 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

resolution is made. Humphrey Pinson, who came home purser 
in the Reformation, petitions for some gratuity for his four years' 
service at Bantam at 105. per month; a good report is given of 
him and so it is resolved to appoint him purser in the ship now 
bound for the Coast. (2//.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
October ii, 1643 [Court Book, vol. xix, p. 6%). 

On reading the letters received this day from Leghorn, mention- 
ing the quantity of coral and rials laden in the Society and 
Margaret Constance, it is resolved to insure 4,000/. upon each ship. 
James Martyn buys 1,320 pieces of nicanees,^ and agrees to pay in 
twelve months. The small ship designed for the Coast is named 
the Endeavour, and the Court resolves to send in her 10,000/. stock, 
six tons of cordage, and a chest of chirurgery ; and entertains 
Humphrey Pinson as her purser. Sarah, mother of Thomas Rogers, 
a factor who died at the Coast, petitions for part of the wages due 
to her son and that his jewels and other things left at Golconda 
and Masulipatam may be sent to England ; she is told that, when 
the money owing by Rogers to the Company is paid, she shall 
receive the remainder of his estate. Mr. Blackston ^ to be requested 
to forbear sequestering the division due to Sir Nicholas Crispe and 
Sir Thomas Abdy until some determination is come to by Parlia- 
ment in answer to the Company's petition delivered yesterday 
to Sir Henry Vane.^ Tomblins, late purser in the Crispiana, to be 
paid 200/. on account of his indigo in the Company's hands. 
(I I//.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
October 13, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 64). 

William Christmas transfers to Thomas Andrews 400/. adventure 
in the General Voyage with all profits. There being no sale in 
England for the cloves on hand, it is resolved to ship them to 
Genoa and Leghorn. Policies of assurance to be made to insure 

^ Striped calicoes. 

* Probably John Blackston, M.P. for Newcastle-on-Tyne. 

^ Referred by the House to the Committee for the Navy on October 12. A month 
later ' the Committee for the Petition from the East India Merchants' was ordered to 
meet the next day. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 359 

three parts of the pepper laden for Italy, the pepper to be valued at 
14^/. per lb., the cloves at 4s. per lb., half this insurance for the 
pepper and all the cloves for the account of the Fourth Joint Stock, 
the other half of the pepper for that of the General Voyage. 
Henry Oulton is entertained to go as a factor in the ship designed 
for the Coast at 150/. per annum, to be employed as the President 
and Council at Bantam shall see fit. He engages to stay in India 
five years ; his wife to receive a third of his wages. Richard 
Wotton, who came home in the Ulysses, is also entertained as 
a factor for Bantam. Thomas Gee, entertained master of the large 
new ship, the William, for Bantam, at 8/. per month and allowed 
100 marks for his maintenance, on the same conditions as Robert 
Bowen, except that he is to leave 500/. with the Company. The 
children of Urian Peters, who is in the Discovery, are given los. 
from the poor-box. (2 //.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
October 19, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 66). 

There being more cloves belonging to the Particular Voyage 
than the Court knew of, it is resolved to send them all to Genoa 
and Leghorn. Richard Hudson petitioning for employment is 
referred to the next court. The father of the late Thomas Keeling, 
a factor at Bantam, to be paid all money due to his son except 
400/., which is to remain six months in the Company's hands, 
for payment whereof the Company's seal shall be given but no 
interest allowed ; the son's bond to be delivered up. The bond of 
Aaron Baker to be delivered to him. (i /.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
October 37, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 67). 

The cloves to be sent to Italy for the account of the Particular 
Voyage are ordered to be shipped in the Freeman, those belonging 
to the Joint Stock in the Mary, in addition to those already shipped 
in the Anthony Bonadventnre for that account. On the recom- 
mendation of Sir Thomas Roe, William Isackson, who has lived 
nine months in Portugal, is entertained to go as under-factor 
in the Endeavour to the Coast, for seven years at 20/. per annum 
for the first five years and 30/. per annum for the last two. VVilHam 



36o COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Methwold, Junior, is also entertained to go as factor to the Coast in 
the same ship, at 30/. per annum the first year and an annual rise 
of 10/. until he has served seven years. On reading two letters 
from Edward Pearse, a factor in the Gulf of Persia, to his father 
Edward Pearse, water-bailiff to the Lord Mayor, the Court orders 
70/. to be paid to Mr. Pearse, Senior, for his son's first seven years' 
service in India. A bill of exchange from Henry Whitaker of 
Amsterdam for 50/. (a gratification given to him from the Company 
some months since) in favour of Hugh Sowden, is ordered to be 
paid. (li//). 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
November 3, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 68). 

Stephen Burton, Richard Piggott, and Samuel Crispe desire the 
Court to accept Sir Nicholas Crispe's adventure of 2,500/. towards 
satisfaction of the debt due by them and others ; they are told that 
Sir Nicholas is indebted besides this to the Company, and that his 
adventure has already been sequestered by Parliament ; Burton and 
Piggott then express their willingness to deposit 150 barrels of 
indigo as better security, but are told that they must stand upon the 
security they already have and provide money towards payment of 
their debt, as the Company has need of it. James Martyn buys all 
the Sinda cloth, agreeing to pay for it at five six months ; he also 
buys all the dust of pepper for -^^^s. per hundred at twelve months' 
time, (i/.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
November 8, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 69). 

Thomas Thatcher and Thomas Handson accepted as securities 
for cubebs sold to the former. Many commodities remaining in the 
warehouses, a general court of sales is appointed to be held this 
day sennight. Upon reading the policies drawn up for assurance 
of the pepper and cloves shipped for Leghorn and Genoa, the 
Court orders 9,000/. to be assured upon the Freeman for the account 
of the Joint Stock and 10,500/. for the General Voyage; upon the 
Mary 7,500/. for the Joint Stock and 5,200/. for the General Voyage ; 
upon the AntJiony Bonadventure 7,700/. for the Joint Stock and 
6,6oc/. for the General Voyage; and upon the Paragon 2,000/. for 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 361 

the Joint Stock and 2,000/. for the General Voyage ; the said 
pohcies to be underwritten in the Company's house and by none 
but good men. It is resolved to consign all the pepper landed 
at Leghorn to Messrs. Job Throgmorton, John Collyer, Daniel 
Oxenbridge, Nicholas Abdy, and Philip Willyams, as half belongs 
to the Joint Stock and half to the Voyage ; it is also ordered that, 
if these factors have not more than 200 bags of pepper in their 
custody, this shall first be sold for the account of the Joint Stock ; 
but if they are unable to sell it within a month and on the arrival 
of the four ships have more than this quantity in their custody, 
then what pepper is sold shall be divided equally between the two 
accounts. The cloves it is resolved to consign to the two sons 
of Mr. James Manns, he undertaking for them that they shall give 
a just and true account of the same. Richard Hudson is enter- 
tained as a factor for Bantam, to be employed as the President and 
Council shall see fit, and to stay five years in India at a salary 
of 66/. i^s. 4d. per annum. William Bailey is appointed captain 
of the two ships bound for Surat at 8/. per month. (i|//.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
November 10, 1643 {Court Book^ vol. xix, p. 71). 

The time for underwriting limited in the preamble being past, 
it is resolved to summon a general court next Wednesday after- 
noon to confirm what has been done and to give consent to the 
time for subscription being lengthened. William Bailey, chosen 
as commander of the two ships for Surat, is appointed to go in the 
Crispiana. John Mucknell, who came home master in the Blessing, 
is questioned concerning her, and reports that she is very strong 
but slow in sailing, which can easily be amended ; the Court orders 
the said ship, or another of like burden, to be sent this year to 
Bantam ; and as it is thought that the Blessing may go, she is 
ordered to be viewed by adventurers in the Joint Stock and in the 
Particular Voyage and if found serviceable to be valued and sold 
by the Voyage to the Joint Stock. John Mucknell chosen master 
of the new ship, the John, to be sent with the Crispiana to Surat, 
at a salary of 7/. per month. Thomas Prowd chosen master of the 
Blessing, at a salary of 61. 135. 4^. per month, and allowed to take 
50/. to employ in private trade, on condition that he does not trade 



362 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

in any of the Company's commodities, and before sailing gives 
to the Governor or Deputy a Hst of what goods he intends to take 
with him. James Fenn transfers to James Bearblocke 600/. ad- 
venture and profits in the General Voyage, the principal being 
divided. The men in the Aleppo Merchant to receive their tincal 
free of freight. Rose Fuller to be paid 1 8/. ^s. due to her daughter, 
on Mr. White, a grocer in the Old Bailey, giving bond to save the 
Company harmless. {^\pp) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
November 15, 1643 {Co2irl Book, vol. kIx, p. 73). 

The trees behind the almshouse at Blackwall ordered to be 
lopped and the * lopps ' distributed among the almsmen, instead 
of the coal which is given to them each Christmas. The larger 
of the two new ships is named the IVzl/iajn, the smaller the JoJm. 
Mr. Dycer buys all the dust of rich indigo at y. id. per lb. at 
three six months from the ist of December, and Robert Cooper, 
Junior, of Ipswich, buys the dust of Sirques indigo for 14^. per lb. 
at the same time. Richard Cooper, Senior, and William Sparrowe 
are accepted as securities for the latter bargain ; but, as all live 
at Ipswich, John Hunter and George Gosnoll, who are there also, 
are desired to witness the signing and sealing of the bills and to 
send them to the Company. Philip White agrees to bore two 
demi-culverins into whole culverins, and four sakers into demi- 
culverins, for which he is to be paid at the rate of 3/. ^s. per ton. 

A General Court of Sales, November 15, 1643 {Court 
Book, vol. xix, p. 74). 

Sale of quilts, chintz, indigo, long pepper, dust of cloves, mace, 
nutmegs, ' benjamin ' [benzoin], gum-lac, and sugar, with prices and 
names of purchasers. The sales being finished, the Governor 
requests all those free of the Company to remain in order to 
be made acquainted with one or two particulars which concern 
them, viz. : that besides the goods now sold, others have been well 
disposed of by treaty, and those remaining referred to the Court of 
Committees for sale : that the time for subscriptions has elapsed 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 363 

and no great sum been underwritten for, though some have under- 
written since the prescribed time ; he therefore desires them to 
resolve whether these last subscriptions shall be confirmed and 
a longer time given in which to underwrite ; whereupon all sums 
underwritten for are confirmed and the time for subscriptions 
extended to the first of January. The Governor then observes 
that as no doubt all know of the safe arrival of the Blessings he 
wishes their directions as to the disposal of her goods ; this by- 
general consent is left to the discretion of the Standing and Mixed 
Committees. (2 //.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
November 17, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 77). 

John Frith buys all the Company's cinnamon for 35-. per lb. 
at six months' time. Lady Clitherowe to be paid 150/. for the 
rent of her house up to the 1st of November, but after then only 
100/. per annum, and the Company to have the benefit of the little 
room over the Treasury ; this is willingly consented to by Chris- 
topher Clitherowe on behalf of his mother. Robert Dycer and 
Zachary Worth accepted as securities for dust of Lahore indigo 
bought by the former ; William and Samuel Webb for mace ; and 
Thomas Gower, William Tilsley and Richard Ashhurst for sugar 
and mace. The Court orders that for Surat this year the Crispiana 
shall take 110 men and return with 80, and the John shall take 90 
men and return with 70. For Bantam the William shall take 
140 men and return with 100, and the Blessing 60 and return with 
40. It is also resolved to send in the ships to Bantam two smiths, 
two coopers, a chirurgeon and his mate, to be disposed of as the 
President and Council there shall sec fit. Richard Wotton enter- 
tained as a factor for Bantam at 70/. per annum, to stay in the 
Indies four years. Mr. Markham presents the account of the 
freight of the Ulysses, by which it appears that 8,866/. 9^-. id. is due 
to her master and owners ; the Court orders Mr. Willson to be paid 
700/. odd and the remainder to lie at interest in the Company's 
hands, for which a bill shall be given. This being agreed to, 
Mr. Willson is desired to advise with the owners about the 50/. 
paid to him by Mr. Baker for the use of the great cabin, it not 



364 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

being thought reasonable that Mr. Baker should bear this charge 
himself or that the master should benefit by his cabin accommo- 
dating the Company's President on his homeward voyage, (il//.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
November 22, 1643 {Coia^t Book, vol. xix, p. 79). 

Davies, the pilot, to attend the Endeavour to Gravesend and the 
Downs. On consideration of the need of money, all bills of those 
indebted are ordered to be put in suit to compel payment, unless 
sufficient reason is given to the contrary. Rose Fuller to be paid 
5/. 5^. (part of the 18/. ^s. in the Company's keeping for the use of 
her daughter), because of her own and her daughter's great necessity, 
she promising to leave the remaining 13/. with the Company until 
her daughter is of age, without troubling again ; eight per cent, 
interest to be allowed her on the 13/. Richard Davidge, who was 
apprenticed to a linendraper in London and afterwards employed 
as a merchant at Morleaux [Morlaix] in France, and is specially 
recommended by Giles Greene, Chairman of the Committee of the 
Navy, is entertained as a factor, at 70/. per annum for the first year, 
rising 10/. yearly for the space of five years. Hugh Fenn, who has 
lived in Holland thirteen years, been assistant and treasurer to the 
Merchant Adventurers there, and is recommended by his father-in- 
law, Edward Missleden, is entertained as a factor, at 70/. per annum 
for the first year, rising 10/, yearly for the space of seven years ; he 
desires time to consider until the next court. An order is read 
from the Committee for Trade concerning the Company lending 
10,000/. to Parliament, to be repaid out of the ' excise of flesh and 
salt ' ; in conformity with this order, a general court is summoned 
to meet next Friday afternoon to ascertain the resolution of the 
generality. (2 pp) 

A General Court, November 27, 1643 {Court Book,vo\. xix, 
p. 81). 

The Governor makes known that by virtue of a summons from 
the Committee of the Navy and the Customs the Deputy and some 
of the Committees attended on the 20th instant, and were desired 
to convene a general court with all convenient speed, to consider 
concerning the loan of 10,000/. at interest upon the security of the 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 36$ 

excise upon flesh and salt, or some other proposition to be put 
before Parliament for advance of the Company's trade, and to 
return a speedy answer. This demand is grounded on two orders 
made by the House of Commons, dated the 15th instant, resolving 
that an excise should be set upon flesh and upon salt (except what 
is employed for fishing) to be appropriated for the maintenance of 
the Navy, as Parliament shall appoint ; and for payment of the 
present debts of the Navy, making necessary preparations for setting 
forth a fleet next spring to guard the seas, defend the kingdom, 
secure trade, and encourage merchants, the Committee of the Navy 
is granted power to treat with the East India or any other company 
of merchants of London, or with private persons, for advance of 
money for the use of the Navy by way of loan to the sum of 50,000/., 
and the House declares its willingness to give fitting encouragement 
to any such company or private persons for advantage of trade 
upon any reasonable proposition being tendered ; both orders 
signed by H. Elsynge, clerk of the Parliament.^ Mr. Governor 
remarks that the reason why a speedy answer is desired is because 
the Company lately petitioned Parliament for redress of some 
abuses and interruptions to its trade, which petition was referred to 
a committee. Sir Henry Vane in the chair, which has met three or 
four times and has voted some things on the Company's behalf; 
but the main business concerning interlopers, the committee advised 
the drawing up of an ordinance of Parliament until an act might be 
passed prohibiting all men from trading into those seas. This 
ordinance has accordingly been drawn up with the advice of counsel 
and delivered to the House, and has been read once,^ and it is hoped 
it will be read this day a second time. Meanwhile this proposition 
has been put forward, and it is thought that the business may be so 
carried that, in the event of the money proposed to be lent by the 
Company not being repaid with interest at the rate of eight per cent, 
out of the excise on flesh and salt within three or four months an 
ordinance of Parliament may be obtained for the Company to pay 
itself, both principal and interest, out of the subsidy of the next 
goods arriving from the East Indies. The Governor therefore 
advises the generality to consider about this loan of 10,000/. and to 

1 See Commons' Journals, vol. iii, p. 313. 

2 On November 22. The second reading did not take place till February 10, 1644. 



S66 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

deliver their opinions. The Deputy adds that having had some 
conference with certain members of the Committee of the Navy and 
Customs, he is convinced that a smaller sum may serve the Parlia- 
ment. Thereupon 5,000/., 6,000/., and 10,000 marks are respectively 
named ; and the Governor putting it to the question, it is generally 
agreed to lend Parliament 5,000/. or 6,000/ at eight per cent.^ 
interest to be repaid within three or four months from the excise on 
flesh and salt, and if that fails, to have an ordinance of Parliament 
for repayment from the customs due on the next goods arriving 
from the East Indies for the Company's account.^ It is also agreed, 
after some dispute, that both the Joint Stock and the Voyage shall 
be concerned in this proposition. (3 //.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
December i, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 84). 

George Midlemore, formerly an apprentice to Mr. Daniel Dobbins, 
admitted to the freedom of the Company by service, paying 40 j-. 
to the poor-box. The following officers are appointed to the ships 
to be di.speeded this year : Thomas Methwold purser in the 
Crispiana for Surat, with Robert Norwood as his mate ; Thomas 
Cooke steward, with Gregory Downes as his mate ; Roger Kaly 
purser in the John for Surat, with Martin Norden as his mate ; 
Richard Saywell steward, with Henry Edwards as his mate ; 
William Danvers purser in the William, with Christopher Hatfield 
as his mate ; William Cary steward, with John White as his mate ; 
John Davies purser in the Blessing, with Richard Poyntell as his 
mate ; John Lambe steward, with William Martyn as his mate. 
Thomas Adams, formerly collector of His Majesty's customs at 
Londonderry, where he lost all his estate through the rebels, 
petitions for employment in India ; he is told that he is too old 
for the voyage, but on a suitable vacancy occurring at home he 
shall be appointed, {i\ pp-) 

^ The exact expression is ' to lend the Companies seale for 5 or 6,000/. to bee lent the 
Parlyament'. Evidently the money was to be borrowed by the Company (who had none 
of their own to spare) and then lent to the state, the idea being that many persons preferred 
the security of a commercial body to that of the Parliament, whose obligations were likely 
to be repudiated should the King prove victorious. 

^ An ordinance for securing 6,000/. to the East India Company was passed by the 
Commons on January 24, 1644, and sent to the Lords for their concurrence, which was 
given on the same day. 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 367 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
December 6, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 86). 

John Davies, formerly chosen purser for the Blessmg, not being 
able to write and having no 'judgement in arithmeticke ', is dis- 
charged and Richard Poyntell appointed in his stead, with Richard 
Evans as his mate. Captain Blackwell's son Joshua is entertained 
as an under-factor for Surat for seven years, to receive 20/. per 
annum the first five years and an additional 10/. each succeeding 
year. William Webb and Robert Smith accepted as securities for 
pepper. Forty chests of sugar returned in the Blessing are sold 
by the candle to Thomas Rich at 545'. 6d. per hundred at two six 
months. A warrant is ordered for payment of 3,000/. to John 
Willson for freight, this sum to be received by the Company at 
seven per cent, interest. Hugh Fenn, lately entertained as a factor 
for Surat, accepts the post. Thomas Millward is allowed half 
per cent, interest for the last six months on the 800/. which had 
remained with the Company for the use of John Millward's credi- 
tors, and the Court orders him to be allowed at the same rate for 
any considerable sum left with the Company. Thomas Steevens 
is granted remission of freight on two tons of private trade, but 
ordered to pay 30/. per ton on the three remaining tons ; for 
making the Downs his first port he is given a gratuity of 50/. ; and 
he is allowed for his indigo according to the rates formerly agreed 
upon. Edward Knipe to be paid for the indigo he brought home 
as private trade, as also all wages due to him ; and his bond to be 
delivered. The Court orders that in future the bread-rooms of all 
the ships shall be rosined and canvassed over as in the Aleppo 
Merchant, not plated as formerly, the bread in the said ship having 
kept in good condition all the voyage. {^\pp) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
December 8, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 88). 

Thirty hogsheads of beef and pork to be shipped in the William 
and Blessing, to supply the small ships at Bantam which trade 
from port to port. The following men are chosen to go as factors 
to India : Thomas Andrews, John James, John Burnell, Henry 
Garry, Christopher Yardley, John Parmiter, P^dmund Style, and 



368 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

John Lewes ; Garry, James, and Style being considered the three 
most able, a difference is to be made in their salaries ; and all are 
required to attend next Wednesday for this to be settled, (i /.) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
December 13, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 90). 

Upon the petition of Susan, widow of Richard Norman, who was 
employed as steward and guardian in the homeward-bound ships, 
and falling in the night from one of the Company's lighters at the 
Custom-house was drowned, the Court orders the petitioner to be 
paid all wages due to her late husband, to be cleared of the 5/. 
which Mr. Younge claims from her as having been in Norman's 
custody at the time of his death, and to be given 5/. from the poor- 
box. The Court, taking into consideration the great damage the 
Company has sustained by the masters of ships being allowed to 
carry landsmen and boys out with them and on arriving in India 
to land them, on which they have been put into the Company's 
factories, now orders that, if any but those expressly sent be so 
employed, such masters as shall permit it shall be fined according 
to the Court's pleasure. In order that the Presidents and Agents 
in the several factories shall not plead ignorance of this order, 
a copy of it is to be sent to each factory, and any disobeying shall 
be liable to be fined. But if through death, or otherwise, it shall be 
necessary to take some ashore, then either the purser or his mate, 
or the steward or his mate may be taken from any of the Company's 
ships to supply this need. Upon the petition of Joyce, widow of 
George Harrold, who was drowned at Blackwall at the launching 
of the John, the Court, in respect of her husband's eighteen years 
good service as lighterman, is pleased to bestow 10/. upon her; and 
promises that, when her son John is thirteen, he shall be sent to 
India. Joan Willson, who is lame and very poor, and whose 
husband died in the Company's service, is given 10s, from the 
poor-box. The Deputy and certain Committees are desired to 
go next Saturday to Blackwall, and with the assistance of Captains 
Goodlad and Jourden, on behalf of the adventurers in the Voyage, 
and of Messrs. Peter Pett and John Southam on behalf of those 
in the Joint Stock, to view the Blessing, her stores and provisions, 
and make such a valuation as they shall think reasonable for the 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 369 

Voyage to take and the Joint Stock to give. There being a re- 
port of some insufficiency in the John, Captains Goodlad and 
Jourden and Messrs. Pett and Southam are also desired to view 
her and report any defect found. All warrants due to the late 
Gerald Pinson for divisions in the Particular Voyage are ordered 
to be paid to his father and executor, Henry Pinson. At the 
request of Mr. Harrison, Chamberlain of London, his son Gilbert 
is entertained to go as an under-factor this year for seven years, 
at 20/. per annum the first five years and an additional 10/. each 
succeeding year. John Parmiter entertained for a like time and 
salary. Thomas Andrews and John Burnell entertained at a 
salary of 30/. for seven years. Christopher Yardley and John 
Lewes entertained at a salary of 30/. for the first five years, rising 
10/. yearly for the next two. Edmund Style, Henry Garry, and 
John James entertained at 40/. for the first year and rising 10/. 
yearly for seven years. The said factors consenting to their several 
salaries, the places to which they and others before entertained 
are to be sent is decided as follows : viz., Wotton, Hudson, Fenn, 
Style, James, Yardley, and Parmiter to go to Bantam ; Knipe 
(if entertained), Robinson, Davidge, Garry, Lewes, Andrews, Burnell, 
Harrison, and Blackwell to go to Surat. (35 /A) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
December 15, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 93). 

Mr. Abdy having bought ninety bales of cotton yarn, he is 
allowed the same tare as the Deputy and Alderman Langham 
were. Colonel Gower, William Tilsley, Richard Ashhurst, and 
Thomas Coutledge accepted as securities for sugar bought by 
Thomas Rich. William Kennon, purser in the Aleppo Merchant, 
given a gratuity of 30/. for bringing home indigo for which the 
Company is to have no freight. John Millett, master of the Aleppo 
Mercha7it, to be delivered his two bales of indigo brought home as 
private trade, he promising not to sell it in town but to take it 
to Leghorn. The twenty bales of indigo formerly seized to be paid 
for at 2s. 2d. and 35-. Q,d. per lb., the owners to be allowed the custom 
due upon it which they have paid, the usual fifteen per cent, being 
deducted, each party to bear its own costs. Thomas Thomblyns 
purser in the Crispiana, and Felix Wombwell, master's mate, to 

S.C.M. It B b 



370 COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

receive all money due to them on payment of 20/. each for private 
trade. Edward Knipe offering to serve the Company, he is asked 
to do so for five years ; but as he desires to go and return in 
the same ship (as he did the last voyage) and the Court does 
not wish this, he requests until this day sennight to consider ; 
meanwhile he is to be paid 118/. 2s. iid. due to him. For his 
demand for wages according to the agreement made with Francis 
Day, which was that he should have 400/. for the voyage if he 
returned within two years, the Court is willing to bestow upon him 
a gratuity of 30/. or 40/., but defers doing so until his resolution 
concerning the voyage is declared. Ordered that 10/. be distributed 
among the poor widows of the East India men according to the 
annual custom, but for the customary 10/. to be given to the poor of 
Stepney parish resolution is deferred until some of the church- 
wardens have been spoken to about the overrating of the Company's 
houses and servants at Blackwall. Peter, a black, who served 
as cook in the Blessing on her homeward voyage, is given \os. 
monthly from September ist to the end of the voyage. A list 
of debts due over six months is presented, and actions are ordered 
to be taken in London against the sureties of John Gearing, Giles 
Pooley, Pedwarden Rumsey, and Stephen Burton ; and for the 
money due for pepper bought by Lord Cottington, actions are to 
be entered against one or two of the sureties upon one of the bonds. 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
December 20, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. 96). 

Davies to be paid 7/. for taking the Endeavour to the Downs. 
Defective ordnance to be used for ballast instead of stones, and 
some ordered to be looked for at about is. 6d. per cwt. suitable 
for this purpose. Bailey, master of the Crispiana, and Mucknell, 
master of the John, request small guns for the great cabin and 
cuddy of their ships ; they are told to look out for such as will 
serve and then refer to Sir John Gayre. Thomas Steevens desires 
remission of freight on his three remaining tons of goods, but this 
is denied. The annual gift of 10/. is ordered to be sent to the 
churchwardens of Stepney to be distributed amongst the poor 
of Poplar, Limehouse, and Blackwall. A petition presented by the 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 371 

watermen and others of Poplar and Blackwall for some contribution 
towards the repair of the bridge from the waterside near the Com- 
pany's Yard at Blackwall is refused, as this bridge is seldom used, 
the Company having its own wharf for landing goods and having 
already the charge of keeping the causeway. The Deputy and 
certain Committees are desired to provide cloth for Surat. The 
Court is reminded that last year it sent to the Court at Oxford for 
a commission to be granted to Mr. Fremlyn and others to treat 
with the Portuguese about a continued peace ; some of the men 
nominated in that commission will return to England this year, and 
it is very difficult ' to gett either that or another in these distracted 
tymes ' ; therefore the Deputy and others are desired to treat with 
the Portuguese Agent resident in England, and to procure a letter 
from him to India about confirmation of the said peace. The 
request of John Mucknell to be allowed to take charge of and 
rig his ship, and that only the men he selects who are entertained 
for the voyage shall be aboard to keep the ship, is granted on con- 
dition that the advice of Boatswain Ingram is taken about cutting 
out the rigging. The petition of Richard Hudson for a year's 
salary in advance, to enable him to clear himself of debts contracted 
during the three years he has been out of employment, is referred 
to the next court, though the Committees seem willing to accommo- 
date him with 40/. or 50/. (2| pp)^ 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
December 32, 1643 {Court Booh, vol. xix, p. 99). 

Richard Hudson is granted an advance of 60/., and his wife 
ordered to be paid 10/. yearly from his salary during his absence. 
The Court orders 264/. i6j., due upon the new imposition laid upon 
goods imported, for the relief of Plymouth, to be paid to the Com- 
missioners of Customs. Resolution as to the stock to be sent 
to Surat and Bantam is deferred ; but it is decided to write 
this day to Leghorn and desire the factors there to make up those 
rials they have in cash to 100,000, and if there are not enough 
then to take up at interest what is wanting and send it to England 
by the first ship, not later than the end of January. The collectors 
for Poplar and Blackwall to be paid 10/. assessed on the Company 
towards the maintenance of a magazine, according to an order of 

B b 2 



37a COURT MINUTES, ETC., OF THE 

Parliament. Two of the Company's almsmen petition for the 
accustomed Christmas gratuity ; they are questioned, and confess 
that they have already received it but were advised to petition by 
Thomas Carpenter ; the latter is ordered to appear at the next 
court to answer this abuse. Austin Malthus, brother and adminis- 
trator of Thomas Malthus, who died at Bantam, to be paid ao/. 
upon account of his brother's estate in the Company's hands ; and 
the dispute between the said Austin Malthus and Nicholas Brethers 
is referred for determination to the Deputy and Richard Davies. 
The slaughterhouses at Blackwall are lent to the Commissioners 
of the Navy for the use of Parliament. Henry, son of John 
Hunt, Serjeant-at-arms to the House of Commons, is entertained 
as an under-factor for Surat with an allowance of 13/. 6s. Sd. 
per annum, to be increased according to his ability and deserts. 
Richard, youngest son of Richard Bladwell, an old adventurer 
with the Company, is entertained for Bantam on the same terms. 
The widow of Vincent Aiscough given lOi-. from the poor-box, 
on condition that she troubles the Court no more. On informa- 
tion that the 10/. given for the poor widows of East India men 
has been distributed in shillings, and that there are many widows 
waiting without who have received nothing, the Court orders 
another 40s. to be distributed amongst them. (2 pp) 

A Court of Committees with the Mixed Committees, 
December 29, 1643 {Court Book, vol. xix, p. loi). 

Boatswain Ingram is ordered to appoint four men in each ship 
to assist in the rigging, serving the cables, looking to the stores, 
and keeping the ships. Subscribers in the new preamble are de- 
sired to bring in the money due upon their subscriptions, and 
any liking to settle all or any other of their payments are to 
be allowed to do so, and to have eight per cent, discount. The 
Court orders the valuation of the Crispiana and Blessing with 
their stores to be perfected, that they may be turned over from 
the Particular Voyage to the Joint Stock. Edward Knipe is 
entertained as a factor for Surat at 300/. per annum, and agrees 
to stay one year in India, and in case there is need of his ser- 
vices two or three longer ; he is given ^tTt^. 6s. 8d. for fresh 
victuals for the voyage. Mr. Bateman is desired to request the 



EAST INDIA COMPANY 373 

Lord Mayor and Court of Common Council to order that the 
Company's ordnance, which was lent to the City and of which it 
has present need, may either be returned or money given to buy 
more. Motion made for consideration of the trade in Bussorah, 
the quantity of indigo sent thither from Surat and carried over- 
land into Turkey abating the price of that commodity not only 
there but in England ; but no resolution is come to. (i^//.) 

List of Calicoes and Piece-goods delivered upon the 
Dividends of the First General Voyage, 1643-44 {Home 
Miscellaneotts, vol. i). 

Giving the quantity and price of the goods, and the names of 
those to whom they were delivered. The entries for 1643 occupy 
fifty-one pages. (70//.) 



INDEX 



Abbot, Edward, 2, 112, 116; offers ships 
upon freight, 95, 97 ; retires from his 
post as Committee, 61 ; his debt to the 
Company, 184, i88 (2), 225, 264, 353; 
transfer of his adventure, 216. 

Abbot, Edward, a factor, 17, 301. 

Abbot, Sir Morris, elected a Committee, 
61 ; resigns, 177 ; scandalous bills ex- 
hibited against, 96, loi ; jewels sent to 
India by, 188, 252, 263 ; adventure trans- 
ferred to, 216 ; his debt to the Company, 
264; his son, see Abbot, Edward. 

Abbot, Richard, 78. 

Abdy, Anthony, Alderman, 33, 175 ; duties 
allotted to, 11, 18, 20, 49, 90; nominated 
for election as Governor, 60 ; elected a 
Committee, 61 ; deceased, 88, 123, 125, 
177; money owing to, 88; his sons, 
196. 

Abdy, John, 196, 268. 

Abdy, Nicholas, made free of the Company, 
196 ; pepper consigned to, 312, 361. 

Abdy, Robert, 332, 369; elected a Com- 
mittee, 195, 262, 331; made free of the 
Company, 196. 

Abdy, Roger, made free of the Company, 
196; pepper consigned to, 260, 261. 

Abdy, Sir Thomas, 301, 358. 

Acton, William, Solicitor to the Company, 
59, 119, 181, 223, 225, 253 ; payment for 
law charges to, 8, 62, 70, 122, 127, 
138, 142, 157, 162, 171, 176, 179, 181, 
248, 253, 255, 261, 270, 338; to be con- 
sulted, 128 ,147, 179, 325, 328; articles, 
&c., drawn up by, 161, 290. 

Adams, Thomas, Alderman, recommends his 
servant for entertainment, 141,142 ; stands 
security for him, 153; made free of the 
Company, 198. 

Adams, Thomas, collector of customs, 
366. 

Adler, John, 271. 

Adler, Thomas, 271. 

Admiralty, the, 120; warrants from, 21, 
28 ; actions entered in the Court of, 56 «., 
96, 174, 216, 315, 351. 354; Marshal of, 
see Smith, Solomon. 

Advice, the, 3, 8. 

Agra, 19. 252. 

Ahmadabad, 333. 



Aldersey, Samuel, 138, 338. 

Aldington, Abraham, money due to, 66, 80, 
84. 

Aldington, Thomas, 40. 

Aleppo, 304 ; consul at, see Barnard, — . 

Aleppo Merchant, the, 334, 367 ; master of, 
see Millett, John; men serving in, 227, 
228, 341, 353, 362, 369; proposal to 
freight, 199, 206, 210, 211 (2); hired 
upon freight, 217; payment for, 222, 
337; timber and kentledge for, 219, 
228; dispatch of, xxiii, 232, 234; stock 
&c. shipped in, 235, 239, 254, 338, 339, 
340,341; passengers in, 2 33, 236; arrives 
home, xxvi, 334 (2) ; value of her cargo, 

334- 
Algernoon, the, 267. 
Alicant, 267. 
Allen, John, 260. 
Allen, Richard, 315; accepted as security 

for goods, 19, 81, 85, 203, 260. 
Allen, Thomas, accepted as security for 

goods, 203, 260, 274 (2). 
Allison, John, 84, 86, 94 ; appointed com- 
mander of the Discovejy, 120; his private 
trade, 295. 
Allyn, Thomas, 76. 
AUyn, William, 76. 

Aloes, 19, 186, 275, 289. See also Socotra. 
Alston, — , 19. 
Altham, Emanuel, loi. 
Amber, 204. 

Amberchee, a neck ornament, 139 Ji. 
Ambergris, 5, 6. 
Ambertson, — , 11. 

Amboyna, abuses committed by the Dutch 
at, 32 (2), 52, 234, 238, 246, 247, 249; 
proposal to reprint the ' Amboyna book ', 
xxii, 234, 235, 238, 243 ; prohibited, xxii, 
240, 241 ; charge for printing, 255, 256. 
Amsterdam, 299 ; the Company's Agent 

at, see Whitaker, Henry. 
Anchors, 287, 301, 316, 317, 320. 
Andrews, Daniel, 39, 157. 
Andrews, Thomas, 331, 35S. 
Andrews, Thomas, a factor, 367, 369. 
Angel, the, master of, see Perry, Thomas ; 

pepper shipped in, 274, 276, 288, 290. 
Angels (coins), 30. 
Aftne the, 291. 



376 



COURT MINUTES, ETC. 



Anthony Bonadventure, the, 352 ; offered 
upon freight, 348 ; cloves shipped in, 359 ; 
to be insured, 360. 

Antwerp, 164. 

Archdeale, Matthew, 187. 

Archdeale, Richard, 187. 

Arinagon, loi. 

Armour, a suit of, 115. 

Anihem, 169. 

Arsens, — , ambassador from Holland, 42, 
46 ; Notes upon the Memorial of, 41-2. 

Artson, Roger, 296. 

Arundel, Earl of. See Howard, Thomas. 

Asaf Khan, 263. 

Aschman, Jeronimo Willyamson, 266. 

Ascough, Elizabeth, 219, 372. 

Ascough, Vincent, 219, 372. 

Ash, — , 242, 

Ashhurst, Richard, accepted as security for 
goods, 78, 363, 369. 

Ashly, — , master of the Sampson, 341 (2). 

Ashmore, Lucy, 323, 324. 

Ashwell, Francis, 337. 

Ashwell, William, 37, 74, 104, 183, 188, 
268, 337; duties allotted to, 2, 17, 19, 
20, 38, 64, 66, 74, 114, 127, 128, 135, 163, 
(2), 171, 198, 203, 209, 216, 218, 242, 
249, 308, 314; to wait with others on 
Secretary Vane, 49, 154 ; elected a Com- 
mittee, 6r, 177, 196, 262, 331 ; to wait on 
the King and Lords, 135, 173, 180 ; 
nominated for election as Deputy Gover- 
nor, 262 ; as Governor, 331. 

Askew. See Askwith, Nicholas. 

Askwith, Anne, 127. 

Askwith, Constance, 89, 159. 

Askwith, Nicholas, claims made by his 
executors, 89, 128, 147, 312, 313. 

Askwith, Vincent, 127. 

Assurance Office, 40, 57. 

Assurance policies taken out by the Com- 
pany, V, 15, 28, 30 (2), 31, 38, 87, 112, 
178. 257, 276, 314, 315, 316, 317 ; condi- 
tions for underwriting in, 30 (2), 31 ; for 
calicoes, cloves, and coral, 36, 45, 230, 
231, 238, 284, 285; for pepper. So, 81, 
257, 262, 276, 28s, 309, 310, 311, 312, 
315 (2), 316, 317. 358, 359; for ships, 
81, 85, 133, 315, 322, 335, 358, 360, 361 ; 
upon the estate abroad, 85, 312, 314. 

Atkins, Humphrey, 153. 

Atkins, Thomas, Alderman, 198. 

Austen, Robert, 151. 

Aylesworth, Susan, i. 

Ayres, William, master of the Roebuck, 
depredations committed by, vi, xvii, 24, 
26, 35, 45, 74, 143, 169, 178; action to 
be taken against, 24, 33, 315 ; Parliament 
to be petitioned concerning, 32, 131, 132 ; 
withdrawal of petition, 132, 178. 



Backhouse, Nicholas, 102 ; made free of 
the Company, 10 ; accepted as security 
for pepper, 153; indebted to the Com- 
pany, 353- 

Backhouse, Rowland, Alderman, 10. 

Baftas, 59, 324, 339. 

Baily, William, commander of the Mary, 

27, 92, loi, 103, 108, 370; gratuity 
given to, 8, 46 ; his account and wages, 

28, 45, 86 ; desires and is granted re- 
mission of freight, 45, 46, 348 ; accusation 
against, 46; elected master of the Refor- 
mation, 84,86; oi ih.Q Crispiatt, 361 (2). 

Baize, Colchester, 323; scarlet, 309. 

Baker, Aaron, 206, 250, 288, 343, 363, 364; 
elected President at Bantam, 134, 149 ; 
his salary, 1 34 ; his reported illness and 
expected return, 149, 150, 279 ; his suc- 
cessor, 150, 299 ; his account and bond, 
356, 359- 

Balasore, 288. 

Bambridge, — , 29. 

Bancks, Daniel, 21. 

Banda, 52. 

Banjarmassin, 92. 

Bankes, Sir John, 224. 

Bankrupts, Commissioners of, 294. 

Bantam, 4;?., 22, 103, 198, 221, 222 (2); 
President at, see Baker, Cartwright, Coul- 
son, Johnson, Muschampe, and Pinson; 
ships for, passim ; ships from, vii, xix, 
xxiii, 15, 68, 70, 78, 100, 138, 162, 
229, 237, 281, 285, 288, 297 ; ordnance 
and stock for, 4, 6, 15, 22, 77, 78, 97, 
104, 114, 183, 196, 205, 250, 294, 298, 
299, 301, 305, 367, 371 ; advices and 
accounts from, 6, 35, 63, 71, 134, 250, 
288, 304 ; blockaded by the Dutch, 53 ; 
factors at and for, 56, 125, 142, 152, 155, 
217, 218, 220, 260, 261, 274, 294, 300, 
353, 35S, 359, 361, 363, 369, 372 (2); 
stock at, 89, 92, 103, 106, 192, 205, 208, 
229, 237, 250; private trade at, 144; 
provisions left by Captain Jourdain at, 
163 (2), 179; an account to be sent home 
of all factors and others at, 288 ; King 
of, guns and ammunition desired by, 3, 
II (2); sent to, 16 ; presents for, 114. 

Barbary, 121, 187. 

Barker, William, 153, 223. 

Barnard, — , Consul at Aleppo, 231. 

Barnes, John, commander of the William, 
68,160; gratuity given to, 102 ; appoint- 
ed master of the Mary, 118; disabled 
through illness, 120. 

Baroda, calicoes from, 324?;., 333. 

Barrett, Thomas, 274. 
Barron, Benjamin, 294. 
Barrow, Thomas, 152. 
Barton, Thomas, 270. 



INDEX 



?,n 



Bassano, Henry, 4, 207. 

Bateman, Anthony, 114. 

Bateman, Richard, 207, 283 ; elected a Com- 
mittee, 177, 262, 331 ; part-owner of the 
Aleppo Merchant^ 210; duties allotted to, 
222, 308, 341, 372 ; nominated for elec- 
tion as Treasurer, 262. 

Bateman, Robert, Treasurer to the Company 
and Chamberlain of London, 116, 144, 
207, 268, 329 ; payments made by and to, 
5, 9, 10, 23, 38, 89; to provide rials and 
take up money at interest, 7, 94, 99, 229, 
279; re-elected Treasurer, vii, 61, 177, 
262, 331 ; his sons, 114 ; transfers adven- 
ture, 135 ; adventure transferred to, 231. 

Bateman, William, 114, 151, 187. 

Bath, Alexander, 300. 

Bath, Guy, 1, 36; accusations against, 19, 
35, 40, 63, 71, 98; payment of his wages 
demanded, 98. 

Batt, William, 193. 

Batten, Captain William, Surveyor of the 
Navy, 159, 162, 314. 

Baynebrigg, Henry, 20, 34, 236. 

Baynebrigg, William, 34, 108 (2). 

Beadle, John, 168. 

Beale, John, 331. 

Beale, Richard, 16. 

Beale, Richard, Junior, 16. 

Bearblocke, James, 362. 

Bearblocke, Lucy, 323, 324, 327. 

Bearden, Philip, 139. 

Beauchampe, — , 22. 

Becke. See De Beck. 

Becke, Thomas, 273. 

Beef, to be distributed to the poor, 29, 267 ; 
for the ships, 67, 97, 99, 197, 210, 235, 
243, 247, 273, 278, 298 (2), 305, 367. 

Beer, 202, 210; for the ships, 10, 67, 197, 
209. 

Beeton, Adrian, 226. 

Bell, Alice, 164. 

Bell, Robert, 164, 238, 243. 

Bellamy, — , 316. 

Bengal, Bay of, 215. 

Benjamin (benzoin), 362. 

Bennett, John, master of the Hart, 7. 

Bernard, Henry, 150. 

Bertie, Robert, Earl of Lindsey, Lord High 
Chamberlain, 121. 

Biggs, Thomas, surgeon, entrenches on the 
Company's rights atBlackwall, 190; de- 
sires certain repairs made and ground 
granted to him there, 304, 316, 323, 332. 

Bills of exchange, 5, 8, 89, 112, 144, 161, 
243, 256, 265, 266 (2), 268, 271, 299, 
.340, 360. 

Bincks, John, 212. 

Bincks, Thomas, 212. 

Bingley, George, 126, 159. 



Birchington, 28. 

Birkdale, James, master's mate in the Lon- 
don, 84, 86 ; embezzled cloth said to be- 
long to, 103, 108, 113, 118; his account 
to be cleared, 94, 151, 152; chief master's 
mate in the Mary, 307. 

Black Book, the, 63, 67 : entries in, i, 95, 
205, 313. 

Black John, 344. 

Blackston, John, a cook at Bantam, 226. 

Blackston, John, M.P. for Newcastle, 358. 

Blackston, Sarah, 226. 

Blackwall, 66, 76, 162, 195, 257, 258, 321, 
368 ; docks and yard at, 5, 1 1 , 28, 43, 64, 
69^ 73> 164, 166, 195, 218, 220, 233, 268, 
278, 301, 315, 319. 320, 322, 343, 344, 
371 ; almshouse at, see Poplar ; Com- 
mittees to go to, 5, 197, 206, 208, 209, 
287, 326, 368; wages at, 8, 12, 17, 36, 
83, 85, 88, 90, 95, 98, 100, 102, III, 139, 
142, 145, T48, 171, 174, 176; petition of 
carpenters at, 7, 320, 371 ; timber, &c., 
sentto, 11,69, 73, 221,233,299,300,301; 
stores and provisions, &c., at, 16, 37, 
45, 160, 164, 166, 188, 219, 326 ; slaugh- 
ter and storehouses at, 21,317, 327, 372; 
gifts to the poor at, 29,218, 267, 278, 370; 
payment for dinners at, 60 ; ships taken 
to, 99, 95, 176, 205, 208, 217, 271, 279, 
293> 309 ; repairs at, xxviii, xxix, 64, 165, 
166, 190,254, 271, 278, 304, 306,326, 327 
(2),337>37i; meeting at, 165-6,326-7; 
fine on houses and land at, 189, 327-8; 
causeway, 190, 325, 326 ; horse-mill at, 
221; ground desired for building purposes 
at, xxviii, 251, 252, 253, 269, 316, 323, 
324, 327, 328, 332 ; assessment at, xxv, 
xxvii, 320, 370. 

Blackwell, Captain John, the King's grocer, 
payment for spices to, 315 ; refused, xxix, 
337 ; his son, 337, 367, 369. 

Blackwell, Joshua, 337, 367, 369. 

Bladwell, Richard, 372. 

Bladwell, Richard, Junior, 372. 

Bladwell, William, 150. 

Bland, — , 145. 

Blessing, the, 8, 22, 286. 

Blessing, the, master of, see Mucknell, John, 
arid Proud, Thomas ; purser, see Davies, 
John; men serving in, 218, 220, 305, 363, 
366, 367, 370; bought, xxi, 205, 208, 
217; payment demanded, 222, 273; re- 
pairs and insurance, 209, 230, 248; pas- 
sengers in, 209, 217, 218; her dispatch, 
xxiii, xxvii, 222, 228; stock, &c., for, 229, 
230, 367 ; designed for Bantam, xxi, 209, 
221, 230, 361 ; arrives home, xxvii, 361, 
363 ; to be sold to the Fourth Joint 
Stock, xxvii, 361 ; to be valued, 368, 369, 
3/2- 



378 



COURT MINUTES, ETC. 



Blount. See Blunt, John. 

Blount, Mountjoy, Earl of Newport, Master 
of the Ordnance, 137. 

Bludder, Marmaduke, 299. 

Bludworth, John, 79«., 84, 128, 131; 
elected a Committee, 61, 331; resigns, 
177; adventures transferred to, 129, 130 
(2), 161; transfers adventure, 130; buys 
silk, 324. 

Blunt, John, 64, 66, 84, 209 ; duties allotted 
to, 29, 75, 76, 125, 261 (2), 301, 305, 
319, 325, 351 (2) ; reprimanded for sel- 
ling pepper, 49 (2) ; sells cotton wool, 
49 ; tare allowed, 350. 

Blythe, William, 41, 221, 255. 

Bodilo, — , 72, 73. 

Bodwyn, John, 275. 

Bogan, Richard, 198. 

Bombay, 268, 283. 

Bond, Captain John, his projected voyage to 
Madagascar, xxviii, 295, 296, 298. 

Bonneale, Samuel, 122, 127, 128. 

Boone, Henry, 94, 323. 

Boothby, Richard, 4, loi, 227. 

Boothby, William, 352. 

Boothes, — , 281. 

Bomeford, Henry, 231, 300; his salary, 

344. 354- 

Boswell, Sir William, Ambassador to Hol- 
land, 43, 44; to obtain satisfaction for 
the Company from the Dutch, xvi, xvii, 
24, 169, 192, 193 ; letters from, xvi, xviii, 
103. 136, i92-3r 217-18, 220, 243, 249 ; 
to, xviii, 180, 285. 

Boulton, Nicholas, 34. 

Boulton, Stephen, 186, 233, 353; buys in- 
digo, 233, 236 ; accepted as security for, 
184, 236, 302 ; made free of the Company, 
303. 

Boulton, William, 210, 302. 

Bourman, Stephen, 39, 49, 153, 260 (2). 

Bourne, — , stationer, 255. 

Bourne, John, steward's mate, 4, 289, 305. 

Bowater, John, 273. 

Bowater, Nicholas, 273. 

Bowden, Nicholas, 339. 

Bowen, Adam, 20, 36, 38, 94, 104, 127, 
236, 243, 252, 328, 343; duties allotted 
to, 37 (2), 60, 79,80, 100, 114, 148, 150, 
161, 200, 204, 207, 226, 231, 232 (2), 
252, 290, 304, 312, 319, 325, 329, 340. 

Bowen, Robert, 20, 357, 359. 

Bowling, Thomas, 17. 

Bowyer, Henry, 202. 

Bowyer, Robert, 202. 

Bowyer, Thomas, 187. 

Box, Henry, 274. 

Box, James, 40. 

Box, Joan, 40. 

Box, Thomas, 40. 



Bradbent, William. See Broadbent. 

Bradbury, manor of, 244, 245. 

Bradgate, Martin, 299. 

Bragg, Bernard, 30. 

Bragg, Matthew, 30. 

Brainthwaite, Richard, 34. 

Bread, 67, 197, 209, 288. 

Bread Street, 157. 

Brethers, Nicholas, 372. 

Brett, Captain, John, 186, 201 ; buys indigo, 
233; 236, 302 ; accepted as security for, 
34. 184. 236, 302. 

Bretton, Francis, 85, 242, 300. 

Brewer, John, 263. 

Bridgehouse, the, 326. 

Bridgeman, James, 121. 

Bridges, Edward, 354. 

Bridges, Margaret, 354. 

Briggs, Henry, 10. 

Brightwell, John, 232. 

Bristol, 58. 

Bristol, Earl of. See Digby, John. 

Broadbent, William, 289, 293, 295. 

Broadcloths, 8 ; to be bought for dispatch 
to the Indies, vii, 4, 16,88,95, 204, 224; 
private trade in, 34, 35, 36, 156, 157, 
161, 270, 295. 

Broad Street, 45. 

Broderas. See Cotton goods. 

Brokes, fines levied for non-compliance 
with the rules of the stock, 70, 81, 83, 
112, 139,. 160, 238, 244, 335; remission 
or reduction of, desired, 23, 30, 31, 33, 
57 (2), 86, 97, 104, 108, 112, 140, 141, 
175, 180, 204, 332; granted, 33, 57(2), 
93. 107, 175, 323. 

Bromeley, Mark, i. 

Bromfeild, Thomas, 203. 

Brooke, Lord. See Greville, Robert. 

Brookes, John, 23 «. 

Browne, Edward, 202, 326. 

Browne, Edwin, 150, 181. 

Browne, Humphrey, 150, 164, 290. 

Browne, John, founder of the King's ord- 
nance, 68, 244, 245, 254. 

Browne, John, master's mate in the Mary, 
20 ; in the London, 306. 

Browne, Richard, English ambassador in 
Paris, letter from, 216. 

Browne, Thomas, 20, 76, 77. 

Browne, Thomas, 212. 

Brumskill, Thomas, 306. 

Buck, Clare, iii. 

Buck, John, ill. 

Buck, Robert, iii. 

Budd, David, the Company's proctor, 96, 
171, 174, 281, 351; payment to, 171, 351- 

Bulkly, Arthur, 207(2), 208. 

Bullock, Anne, 344. 

Bunce, James, 267, 293. 



INDEX 



379 



Burgaree, 232. 

Burgis, William, 219. 

Burlamachi, Philip, xviii, 82, 154, 221 ; 
letter from, 43-4. 

Bumell, John, 367, 369. 

Burnell, Thomas, 298, 350 ; elected a Com- 
mittee, 195, 262, 331 ; duties allotted to, 
168, 231, 283, 284, 291, 292, 293 ; nomi- 
nated for election as Deputy-Governor, 

331- 

Bnrrell, Andrew, 34. 

Burridge, John, 244. 

Burton, Stephen, 102, 120, 168; accepted 
as security for goods, 20, 153 ; offers to 
buy indigo, 95, 105, 108 ; his debt to the 
Company, 325, 353, 356, 360, 370. 

Burton, Thomas, 337. 

Bussora, 104, 106, 373. 

Butt, Owen, 142. 

Buxton, John, 7. 

Byle, George, 4, 28. 

Cables (see also Cordage), 6, 36, 38, 84, 
I", 157. 158, 162, 283, 284, 316, 317, 
320, 327(2), 333, 372. 

Caesar, the, 4, 5, 89, 134, 151, 212, 229; 
commander of, see Jourdain ; master of, 
see StalloD, John ; designed for Bantam, 
3, 15, 16, 226; forSurat, 287, 288; stock, 
&c., to be sent in, v, 15, 16 ; her charter 
party, 22, 114, 137, 138; private trade 
in, 137, 163; freighted by the Company, 
79, 95, 96, 140; arrives home, xix, 137, 
138, 140, 150; stowage of her cargo, 138, 
139; impost on, 172, 181,242, 264; 
proposal to freight again, 199, 206, 226, 

Caesar, Sir Charles, Master of the Rolls, 
256. 

Calcott, Roger, the estate of Robert Coul- 
son to be delivered to, 188, 189, 205, 253. 

Calicoes (see also Cotton goods) ; divisions 
declared in, 36, 45, 76, 78, 79, 178, 179, 
275, 276, 342 (2), 346. 

Cambden House, 351. 

Cambell, Sir James, 61, 123, 202 ; adven- 
ture transferred to, 28 ; his executors, 301. 

Cambell, Dame Racbael, 301. 

Cambridge, 23. 

Candle auction, 78, 355; goods sold by, 

36, 38, 39. 50. 77. 109. "o. 140, 185, 

315, 339, 367 ; adventures sold by, 57, 

58, 97, 98, 99, 116, 160, 161. 
Canham, Thomas, 189. 
Canterbury, Archbishop of. See Laud, 

William. 
Canvas, 67, 8i«., 171,176(2), 200, 221, 

249. 329. 352. 

Cape of Good Hope, 10, 41, 173, 277, 296. 

Cappur, John, Remembrancer to the Com- 
pany, 14, 19; duties allotted to, 6, 10, 



27, 63, 64, 66, 67, 86, 96, III ; his illness 
and death, 140, 149 ; his son, 155, 217. 

Cappur, John, Junior, 155, 2